Dr. Michael Forster

Time running out to stave off human health impacts of climate change

Here’s just a bit of what the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (hardly a heretical or inflammatory source) says about climate change:

“Changes occurring in the world’s climate are affecting our health and wellbeing, and will have even greater impacts in the future. Although scientific understanding of the effects of climate change is still emerging, there is a pressing need to prepare for potential health risks. A wide variety of organizations (federal, state, local, multilateral, private and nongovernmental) is working to address the implications of global climate change.

“Climate change affects us by:

  • Increasing deaths and illnesses from heat stress as temperatures rise.
  • Increasing risk of injuries and illnesses due to extreme weather events, such as storms and floods.
  • Increasing respiratory and cardiovascular illness and deaths caused by smoke from heat-related and drought-related wildfires, as well as changes in air pollution, particularly ozone smog.
  • Increasing cases of allergic disease brought about by elevated levels of pollens caused by more vigorous weed growth and longer pollen seasons.
  • Changing the rates and ranges of infectious diseases carried by insects or in food and water.
  • Threatening the safety and availability of food and water supplies.
  • Inducing greater levels of mental and emotional stress in response to climate change and extreme weather-related emergencies.

“The most vulnerable among us—children, elderly people, those living in poverty, people with underlying health conditions, people living in certain geographic areas—are at increased health risk from climate change….”

Now, given the frightening prospect of severely negative health impacts related to climate change, shouldn’t we be getting our collective rear in gear to halt the behaviors most contributing to climate change?  Which is to say, simply, that we must radically scale back carbon emissions, reversing the current trajectory.  And we must do so without delay – as in right now, immediately, today – not in some hazy future when “the economy improves enough,” or new technology delivers us (anyone have the blueprint for a carbon vacuum cleaner that operates on a global scale, in their desk drawer, perhaps?) from ourselves.

Time is running out on our ability even to mitigate the worst effects of climate change on the health of homo sapiens - not to mention the 150-200 daily victims of species death already underway.

 

Dr. Michael Forster
Dr. Michael Forster

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