Professional Development - Frequently Asked Questions

What is the DuBard Association Method® ?
The DuBard Association Method® is a phonetic, systematic, structured, incremental and cumulative multisensory approach for teaching language and speech to children with multiple difficulties in language learning. It was devised originally by the late Mildred McGinnis, a teacher at Central Institute for the Deaf in St. Louis. The DuBard Association Method®, which is Orton-Gillingham based on content and principles of instruction, has been modified and expanded by the late Dr. Etoile DuBard and the staff of the DuBard School for Language Disorders at The University of Southern Mississippi since the school was founded in 1962.
How do I learn to implement the DuBard Association Method® ?
Maximum success in using the DuBard Association Method® comes from intensive professional preparation. The DuBard Association Method® basic course is a 40-hour offering. Following successful completion of the basic course, one can participate in the DuBard Association Method® seminar (another 40-hour offering) and professional practicum.
When is the basic DuBard Association Method® course offered?
The basic course is offered each summer in a 5-day/40 hour format during the first week of June. In addition, the basic course is offered every fall in a 6-day/40 hour format. Please check this link periodically for information on course sites and dates. The basic course also is offered through the regular University curriculum in the Department of Speech & Hearing Sciences every fall semester. It is typically taught as a late afternoon class on Tuesdays and Thursdays from August through December. It is offered for either undergraduate or graduate credit from The University of Southern Mississippi.
When is the DuBard Association Method® seminar offered?
The DuBard Association Method® seminar is offered each summer in a 5-day/40 hour format during the third week of June. Please check this link for exact dates.
When is DuBard Association Method® professional practicum offered?
Professional practicum is offered during the DuBard School summer program in June. Please check this link for exact dates. Professional practicum may be scheduled for other times by arrangement.
What is the difference between the 5-day and the 6-day format for these courses?
The 5-day format is scheduled from 8:00 am until 5:00 pm for five consecutive days.The 6-day format is scheduled for three days from 8:00 am until 3:45 pm. Approximately four weeks later, an additional three days is scheduled. This format is less intensive than the 5-day format, but the same information is included in both. Each format includes 40 hours of instruction.
What does it cost to take an DuBard Association Method® basic course and seminar?
Both the basic course and the seminar can be taken for academic credit or as a noncredit activity.
Academic credit: Southern Miss tuition for a three-semester-hour graduate course plus $400 is assessed. Contact Southern Miss for current graduate tuition rates.
Noncredit: Contact the Professional Development Coordinator of the DuBard School or the Southern Miss Office of Professional Development and Educational Outreach for current fees.
Each course also may be taken for two types of continuing education credit (CEUs).
Southern Miss CEUs: A fee of $80 is assessed for 4.0 CEUs.
ASHA CEUs: The DuBard School for Language Disorders is approved by the Continuing Education Board of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) to offer continuing education activities in speech-language pathology and audiology. The course and seminar are offered for 4.0 CEUs (intermediate level; professional area).
ASHA CE Provider approval does not imply endorsement of course content, specific products, or clinical procedures.
No fee is charged by Southern Miss or DuBard School for ASHA CEUs. However, ASHA members must pay fees to ASHA to access these CEUs.
Who should attend DuBard Association Method® training?
The DuBard Association Method® courses, seminars, and practicum are appropriate for professionals interested in helping individuals with language learning problems, including problems with reading. This includes speech-language pathologists, teachers of dyslexic/learning disabled children, special education teachers, regular education elementary teachers, teachers of the deaf or hard-of-hearing, and school administrators.