Graduate Course Descriptions, Fall 2011

 

611: TOPICS IN CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE: CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN LITERATURE - DR. KATE COCHRAN

The literature of the American South, from 1945-present, reflects the region’s dramatic social changes since WWII. Preceded by the postbellum New South Creed and the Southern Renaissance of the 1920s and 30s, contemporary southern novels showcase both a variety and a progression of conceptions of the South. This class will examine primary texts and secondary criticism that overview the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s, what Cobb calls the “No South” of the 1970s, the “Grit Lit” of the 1980s, the postsouthernist 1990s and 2000s, as well as the current view of a “global South.” Primary texts might include Warren’s All the King’s Men (1947), O’Connor’s Wise Blood (1952), Toole’s A Confederacy of Dunces (1969/1980), Dickey’s Deliverance (1970), Welty’s The Optimist’s Daughter (1972), Percy’s Lancelot (1977), Walker’s The Color Purple (1982), Smith’s Oral History (1983),Kenan’s A Visitation of Spirits (1992), Allison’s Bastard Out Of Carolina (1992), Gaines’s A Lesson Before Dying (1993), Kingsolver’s The Poisonwood Bible (1998), and McCarthy’s The Road (2007). These novels will be supplemented by critical articles and excerpts from longer theoretical and interdisciplinary texts. The course requirements will be an in-class presentation, a film review, and a seminar essay.

 

625: READINGS IN FICTION - PROF. STEVE BARTHELME

Studies in contemporary fiction. Repeatable to 6 hours.

 

628: TEACHING CREATIVE WRITING - DR. ANGELA BALL

Introduces students to creative writing pedagody.

 

640: BIBLIOGRAPHY AND METHODS OF RESEARCH IN ENGLISH - DR. ERIC TRIBUNELLA

ENG 640 introduces students to the professional study of literature, focusing on critical reading practices and approaches to literary, theoretical, and other cultural texts; on the conventions of scholarly conversations in the field of English; and on the components and mechanics of literary-critical essays.

 

650: STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE - DR. KAY HARRIS

The Middle Ages saw the advent of several innovations important to western civilization and culture -- among them, purgatory, feudalism, romantic love, chivalry, vernacular literatures, “neverland,” a middle class, and the rebirth of Aristotle, Aesop, and Roman Law. Medieval literature was no less innovative. In our class, we will study a selection of influential English, French, and Italian medieval texts that engage issue of salvation in various guises.

Readings will include Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Morte Darthur, The Book of Margery Kempe, and selections from The Divine Comedy, Wycliff and Wycliffite writings, Piers Plowman, The Decameron, and The Canterbury Tales.

Students will be required to write response papers that offer close readings of texts and a final term paper.

 

670: STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE I - DR. LUIS IGLESIAS

This course, which traces the development of American literature from the colonial and Revolutionary era through the first quarter of the 19th century, will focus on issues of expressive form, addressing the general sense that early Anglo-American writers were mainly concerned with “practical,” political matters. The absence of a traditional cultural community and heritage has led to viewing the emergence of literary writing as a secondary concern. This consensus view has perhaps contributed to a tendency to read the literature of the period historically rather than critically or aesthetically. This course will attempt the opposite and approach late colonial to early national writings through their literariness. Toward that end, the course will survey the broad range of genres used by our early writers: political tract, sermon, autobiography, travel writing, literary theory, epic, short story, and the novel. Historical context and meaning will feature importantly in the discussion as they are imaginatively represented and recast by the writers of this exciting and formative period. The list of writers will draw on the old and new canons of American literary studies as the course surveys their generic and stylistic innovations and accommodations.

This course will read the seminal writers and works of American literary history, including among others: 



John Winthrop, A Model of Christian Charity (1630)

Mary Rowlandson, The Sovereignty and Goodness of God (1682)

Benjamin Franklin, Autobiography (1771)

Joel Barlow, The Vision of Columbus (1787)

Olaudah Equiano, An Interesting Narrative (1789)

Susanna Rowson, Charlotte Temple (1794)

Royall Tyler, The Algerine Captive (1797)

Charles Brockden Brown, Edgar Huntly (1799)

Washington Irving, The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon (1821)

James Fenimore Cooper, The Spy (1821)

 



690: TEACHING FRESHMAN COMPOSITION - PROF. JOYCE INMAN


Paces English 101 and 102. Provides practical models for writing assignments, teaching techniques, and classroom management for teachers of Freshman Composition. Repeatable to 4 hours. Credit hours do not count toward degree.


 

711: SEMINAR IN POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE - DR. LINDA ALLEN


This seminar will provide a strong foundation in postcolonial theory, which we will test against a sampling of postcolonial literature. Critical readings will likely include Fanon, Memmi, Cesaire, Said, Spivak, and Mohanty, among others. Literature will likely include works by Dangarembga, Coetzee, Aidoo, Ngugi, Morrison, and Hagedorn, among others.



 

721: SEMINAR IN FICTION WRITING - PROF. STEVE BARTHELME

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, permission of instructor, and enrollment in Center for Writers. Workshop in fiction writing. Repeatable to 9 hours for M.A., to 18 hours for Ph.D.



 

722: SEMINAR IN POETRY WRITING - DR. ANGELA BALL


Prerequisites: Graduate standing, permission of instructor, and enrollment in Center for Writers. Workshop in poetry writing. Repeatable to 9 hours for M.A., to 18 hours for Ph.D.



 

744: SEMINAR IN LITERARY CRITICISM: POSTMODERNITY AND NEOSHAMANISM - DR. MARTINA SCIOLINO


Among other things, postmodernity is characterized by a host of alienations and disillusionments. Neoshamanism is a popular spiritual movement that employs ceremonies, rituals and other arts to heal such cultural disorders. This course will explore those efforts as they intersect with trends in contemporary literature, film and cultural theory. Readings will include major essays in postmodern theory, anthropology, science fiction and cultural studies. Participants will prepare a seminar paper that applies one concept related to our discussions to a primary source of their own choosing.

 



763: SEMINAR IN ENGLISH ROMANTICISM - DR. KEN WATSON


This seminar will read some of the extensive materials ion both prose and poetry that record the complicated and nuanced English reaction to the revolution in France and subsequent events. Likely suspects: Blake, Burke, Coleridge, Godwin, Hazlitt, Paine, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth.

Requirements will include reading, participation, presentations, and papers.