Graduate Course Descriptions, Spring 2012

506:  HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE - DR. STANLEY HAUER (Mon-Wed-Fri 9:00-9:50)

This course surveys the history of English from its rise in Indo-European to its development as present-day English. Several digressions further enlighten the course, such as the history of the alphabet and English spelling, the origin and use of slang, and the differences between British and American English.



540:  HISTORY OF LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY - DR. MICHAEL MAYS (Mon 3:30-6:15)

A survey of western criticism and theory from Plato and Aristotle to the present. While the emphasis in the course will be historical, a good deal of our attention will be focused on developments over the last century.

Text
Hazard Adams, Critical Theory Since Plato

Requirements
Weekly reading responses
Two 10-12 page papers 

 

626: READINGS IN CONTEMPORARY POETRY:  ECO PO - POETRY OF THE ENVIRONMENTS - DR. ANGELA BALL (Thu 3:30-6:15)

This class will explore work by contemporary poets who take it as their mission to write from and to the physical world.  Poets studied will include Robinson Jeffers, Elizabeth Bishop, Gary Snyder, Wendell Berry, W.S. Merwin, and an assortment of newer practitioners paying tribute to the interconnectedness of planetary life and the necessity of attention to the generative forces that sustain us.

 

627: INTRODUCTION TO PUBLISHING - DR. ANGELA BALL (Tue 3:30-6:15)

This class will concentrate on the literary magazine—viewed from the standpoint of both hopeful submitter and merciless editor—with additional input from the people who assemble the product—either physically or virtually.

The class will study current journals, querying their editors for information; while also finding other sources of information about the publishing world.  We will also look at literary presses, both small and large, with a view to greater understanding of the processes that in large part govern our careers.

Students will help to edit the forthcoming Prize Issue of the Mississippi Review.  If conditions are favorable, they will produce a new issue of Product, our student literary magazine.

 

640: CRITICAL READING AND METHODS IN ENGLISH- DR. MONIKA GEHLAWAT (Thu 6:30-9:15)

Instruction in the collection, evaluation, and presentation of research materials.

 

641:  ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODS - DR. CHARLES SUMNER (Mon 6:30-9:15)

Instruction in the collection, evaluation, and presentation of research materials and the development of scholarly methodologies.

 

 655:  STUDIES IN SHAKESPEARE - DR. MARK DAHLQUIST (Tue 6:30-9:15)

Shakespeare wrote his plays and poems in the shadow of religious controversy and change, and during a time when he and other playwrights were required by law to avoid depicting controversial religious matters on stage.  This seminar considers a range of Shakespeare’s major plays and poems (Measure for Measure, King John, and Hamlet, for example), paying special attention to the growing political and religious tensions that shaped discussions of artistic, political, and psychological questions during the time that Shakespeare lived and worked. 

 

690:  TEACHING FRESHMAN COMPOSITION - DR. JOYCE INMAN (Mon 11-1:45)

Paces English 101 and 102. Provides practical models for writing assignments, teaching techniques, and classroom management for teachers of Freshman Composition

 

721:  SEMINAR IN FICTION WRITING - PROF. STEVEN BARTHELME (Tue  6:30-9:15)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, permission of instructor, and enrollment in Center for Writers. Workshop in fiction writing. Repeatable to 9 hours for M.A., to 18 hours for Ph.D.

 

721:  SEMINAR IN FICTION WRITING - PROF. ANDREW MALAN MILWARD (Wed 3:30-6:15)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, permission of instructor, and enrollment in Center for Writers. Workshop in fiction writing. Repeatable to 9 hours for M.A., to 18 hours for Ph.D.


722: SEMINAR IN POETRY WRITING - DR. MICHAEL ROBBINS (Wed 3:30-6:15)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, permission of instructor, and enrollment in Center for Writers. Workshop in poetry writing. Repeatable to 9 hours for M.A., to 18 hours for Ph.D.

 

723:  NON-FICTION WRITING - PROF. STEVEN BARTHELME (Thu 6:30-9:15)

Workshop in the writing of nonfiction prose, memoir, and personal essay.  Repeatable to 9 hours.

 

761:  18TH CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE - DR. NICOLLE JORDAN (Tue-Thu 2:25-3:40)

Provides extensive study of an author, topic, or genre in 18thcentury British literature.

 

770: AMERICAN LIT I:  THE "WRITTEN" CIVIL WAR - DR. ELLEN WEINAUER (Mon-Wed 2:00-3:15)

Of the American Civil War Walt Whitman once declared: “the real war will never get in the books.”  In his important 1973 study, The Unwritten War, Daniel Aaron provides a sort of anti-history, a copious account of writings about the war that, for Aaron, lends credence to Whitman’s claim.  For Aaron, the American Civil War is an “unwritten” war, “unfaced” if not “unfelt” by the writers who came through and after it.  This course will take up the challenge that Aaron’s study poses, exploring both critical assumptions about what it means to “write” the war and the varieties of texts the Civil War, and its aftermath, produced.  Reading across lines of race, gender, and region, and focusing primarily on works written during and in the immediate aftermath of the war, we will attempt to make sense of the many ways in which the war shaped American literature—and, conversely, the ways in which literary works about the war shape its place in the American historical imagination. 

 

771: AMERICAN LIT II:  ROBERT FROST, MODERNISM, PRAGMATISM, AND THE BOOK TRADE - DR. JONATHAN BARRON (Tue-Thu 1-2:15)

In this seminar we will read Frost’s poetry in terms of three major issues that beset not only his poetry but the literary enterprise generally. Unlike other modernist poets of his generation, Frost elected to court a popular audience for his poetry. By looking at his biography, prose, and poetry we will examine the implications of “selling” literature, especially poetry, in a commercial environment. This course will raise questions concerning modernist literature, intellectual and literary culture, and the role of the humanities in the American 20th century. Principle works will include the Library of America edition of Robert Frost, Jay Parini’s biography, a forthcoming edition of Frost’s letters, and readings in modernism, pragmatism, and 20th century intellectual culture.

 

773: SEMINAR IN AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE - DR. SHERITA JOHNSON (Wed 6:30-9:15)

Richard Wright is an acclaimed (and controversial) author of several novels, short stories, autobiography, and political treatises.  This course is designed to introduce students to the world of Richard Wright. Our study will focus on several selections from his canon like Uncle Tom's Children, Native Son, 12 Million Black Voices, The Color Curtain, and White Man, Listen! Literary criticism, film, and a variety of other materials will be used to supplement our study of the primary texts. Regular attendance is required. Bi-weekly short critical essays and a well-researched, scholarly article-length essay are a few requirements for the course.