Graduate Course Descriptions, Summer 2010

 

518: ADOLESCENT LITERATURE - DR. ERIC TRIBUNELLA

 

519: STUDIES IN WORLD LITERATURE - DR. LUIS IGLESIAS

 

663: READING THE VICTORIAN LONG POEM - DR. KEN WATSON

This summer class will read as many Victorian long poems as possible. Likely suspects: Arnold, “Empedocles on Etna,” Tennyson, “In Memoriam,” Barrett Browning, “Aurora Leigh,” Robert Browning, “The Ring and the Book.” Requirements include reading, participation, presentations, and papers.

 

721: SEMINAR IN FICTION WRITING - PROF. RICK BARTHELME

 

597CA: CLASSICS OF CHILDREN’S BRITISH LITERATURE - DR. JAMEELA LARES

This course will explore British children’s literature in its rich historical and geographical context. Course activities will combine the reading of literary classics with visits to the actual places which generated them and with presentations on various aspects of literature by noted British specialists.  Speakers in former years have included such well-known figures as Brian Alderson, Mary Cadogan, Jenni Calder, Pat Pinsent, Brian Sibley, Gillian Spraggs, Ann Thwaite, and Nigel Wood.  We will visit fantasy sites in Oxford associated with Lewis Carroll, C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, and more recently with Harry Potter; cross Pooh Bridge in Milne’s Ashdown Forest; find traces of Long John Silver in Stevenson’s Edinburgh; and look for Peter Rabbit in Potter’s Lake District.  In London, we will explore the appeal of Dick Whittington to city apprentices four hundred years earlier; walk about the maritime world of Greenwich Village and think of Jim Hawkins sailing to Treasure Island, visit the Old Royal Observatory and experience a child’s wonder of having a foot in each hemisphere at the Greenwich Meridian, and see Kensington Garden to understand how J. M. Barrie could find Peter Pan in the magical park across the street.  Throughout, we will look at how various texts are constructed as literature and how they reflect historical, cultural and psychological realities.  Although the course will be organized around a literary understanding of the texts, we will also look some to the fields of education, bibliography, and entertainment.


599CA: LITERARY LONDON AND DUBLIN - DR. MICHAEL MAYS

“When a man is tired of London,” Samuel Johnson remarked, famously, “he is tired of life. For there is in London all that life can afford.” Throughout the ages—both long before Johnson and long since—it is this sense of London as a compendium of human life that has fascinated and charmed writers as diverse as Chaucer and Shakespeare, Blake and Dickens, Conrad and Woolf. For these writers and scores of others, London has served as both subject and seemingly limitless fount of literary creativity. Through works such as Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, Conrad’s The Secret Agent, H.G. Wells’s Tono-Bungay, and Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes stories, this class will explore literary representations of London as the world center of arts, commerce, politics, and finance that it has been now for many centuries. From 7 Baker Street, to the Dickens Pub, to Greenwich, and Shakespeare’s recreated Globe Theatre, we will canvass the nooks and crannies, the boulevards and alleyways that constitute one of the great cosmopolitan world cities. Just as London has served as a magnet for writers from across the globe, however, it has just as often served as foil for writers closer to home. And in this regard, a second focus of the course will be on the love/hate relationship towards the great city as experienced by numerous Irish writers, including Oscar Wilde, George Bernard Shaw, and W.B. Yeats. In addition to field trips, lectures, and site-visits around London and its environs, the course will include four days in Dublin, following the trail of Joyce’s Ulysses, the Georgian squares of Yeats’s poetry, and the still-vital Irish National Theatre, the Abbey.