Undergraduate Courses Fall 2011

301: ENGLISH GRAMMAR - ERIC HATCHER

A comparative study of traditional and structural grammars, with attention to usage and rhetorical uses of grammar

 

332: ADVANCED COMPOSITION - DR. ANGELA BALL

Prerequisite: ENG 101 and ENG 102. Junior standing recommended. Emphasizes writing, research and documentation skills needed for professional papers

 

332: ADVANCED COMPOSITION (FOR SCIENCE STUDENTS)- PROF. JENNIFER ROBERTSON

Prerequisite: ENG 101 and ENG 102. Junior standing recommended. Emphasizes writing, research and documentation skills needed for professional papers (specific to students in the sciences)

 

333: TECHNICAL WRITING - VARIOUS INSTRUCTORS

Prerequisite: English 101, 102 and junior standing or twelve hours in student’s major field. Stresses report writing in student’s major field

 

312: SURVEY OF POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE - DR. SHERI HOEM

A study of literature concerned with the discursive, cultural, and political independence of peoples subjugated by colonial empires

 

319: LITERARY STUDY OF THE BIBLE - DR. JAMEELA LARES

A scholarly examination of the literary structure and style of the English Bible, with particular focus on examining genres and performing close readings of texts. When possible, we will also look at such ancillary considerations as biblical translation, literary paraphrase, and schools or methods of interpretation. Texts: Leland Ryken’s very readable Words of Delight: A Literary Introduction to the Bible, plus, in honor of its 400th year anniversary, we will be looking in particular at the King James Bible, a book that, in the words of the Times Literary Supplement, is “a book that attracts superlatives . . . . All other versions still exist, as it were, in its shadow. It has shaped, formed and molded the language with which the others must speak.” Course requirements: regular reading and class participation, three longer written assignments, weekly reading quizzes, two unit exams and a final exam. 

 

340: ANALYSIS OF LITERATURE - DR. NICOLLE JORDAN, DR. SHERITA JOHNSON, DR. KEN WATSON

Introduces the discipline of literary criticism. Prerequisites: ENG 101, 102, 203

 

350: BRITISH LITERATURE I - DR. JAMEELA LARES

A survey of major works and genres of British literature from the beginnings through the middle of the eighteenth century. We will focus not only on significant texts, but also on strategies for reading and discussing those texts. Among the texts we will examine are Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, and Milton’s Paradise Lost.

Course requirements: regular reading and class participation, three short papers on assigned topics, quizzes, midterm and final exam. 

 

351: BRITISH LITERATURE II - DR. MORGAN FRITZ

Surveys major British literature from Romantic period to the present

 

370: AMERICAN LITERATURE I - DR. ELLEN WEINAUER

Surveys American literature from its beginnings to the Civil War

 

371: AMERICAN LITERATURE II - DR. JAMEELA LARES

A survey of major works, genres, and philosophies of American literature from just after the Civil War to today. We will focus not only on significant texts, but also on strategies for reading and discussing those texts, including for example the poetry of Whitman, Dickenson, Frost, and Stevens; various works of short fiction, including Wright’s “The Man Who Was Almost a Man”; a longer narrative work such as Chopin’s The Awakening or Cather’s My Ántonia, and a play such as O’Neill’s Long Day’s Journey into Night. Course requirements: regular reading and class participation, two papers on assigned topics, quizzes, midterm and final exam. 

 

371: AMERICAN LITERATURE II - DR. CHARLES SUMNER

Surveys American literature from the Civil War to the present

 

372: AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE - DR. SHERITA JOHNSON

Surveys major African-American writers and their influences

 

400: SENIOR SEMINAR: POSTMODERNITY AND NEOSHAMANISM - DR. MARTINA SCIOLINO

Among other things, postmodernity is characterized by a host of alienations and disillusionments. Neoshamanism is a popular spiritual movement that employs ceremonies, rituals and other arts to heal such cultural disorders. This course will explore those efforts as they intersect with trends in contemporary literature, film and cultural theory. Readings will include major essays in postmodern theory, anthropology, science fiction and cultural studies. Participants will prepare a seminar paper that applies one concept related to our discussions to a primary source of their own choosing.

 

400: SENIOR SEMINAR: BRITONS AT HOME AND ABROAD - DR. NICOLLE JORDAN

This course explores the mobility of Britishness by looking at eighteenth-century British literature in domestic and foreign settings. We’ll explore whether British identity is portable and how it changes when transplanted to new soil. We’ll also investigate how certain literary genres that are typically associated with Britain (e.g., pastoral, Restoration comedy) evolve when they are relocated in new geographical and social terrain. Authors include Aphra Behn, Jane Barker, Daniel Defoe, Samuel Johnson, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Jane Austen.

 

400: SENIOR SEMINAR: JAMES JOYCE - DR. MICHAEL MAYS

This Senior Seminar/Capstone course will focus on the work of the greatest writer of fiction in English in the twentieth century, James Joyce. While much of the class will be given over to Joyce’s masterpiece, Ulysses, we will also be reading Joyce’s remarkable short story collection, Dubliners, his one play, Exiles, the semi-autobiographical novel, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; we will conclude by glancing at Finnegans Wake, the book Joyce spent the last seventeen years of his life writing. 

Texts
Dubliners
Exiles
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Ulysses

 

402: LITERATURE FOR TEACHERS - DR. KATE COCHRAN

The study of literature and literary theories with pedagogical applications. Restricted to declared English licensure majors

 

410: STUDIES IN ETHNIC LITERATURE - DR. LINDA ALLEN

This section of ethnic literature will focus on the major works of Nobel Prize-winning author Toni Morrison, in an attempt to unpack and understand her interpretation of ‘American reality.’ We will read all of her adult fiction, and we will be contextualizing our reading with literary criticism, theory, and history. Simultaneously, we will be honing literary analysis and close-reading techniques as we develop our skills as critical writers.

 

418: LITERATURE FOR THE ADOLESCENT - DR. ERIC TRIBUNELLA

ENG 418 provides a survey of young adult literature from its origins in the mid twentieth century to the present. The course introduces students to major genres, works, and authors of young adult literature and puts literary texts in dialogue with historical constructions and experience of adolescence in American culture. 

 

452: ARTHURIAN LITERATURE - DR. MICHAEL SALDA

A survey of seminal British and Welsh Arthurian works, c. 500-1500. 

Primary readings will include selections from Gildas, Bede, Nennius, Geoffrey of Monmouth, the Mabinogion, the Welsh Annals, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Chaucer, Malory, and others.

Student requirements will include exams, presentations, and a research essay.

 

454: SURVEY OF SHAKESPEARE - DR. PHILIP KOLIN

This course will introduce students to Shakespeare’s biography, language, and stages. The emphasis, however, will be on how Shakespeare’s plays have been performed, both on 16th/17th century stages and on contemporary ones. We will read 8 representative plays, including some early comedies such as The Comedy of Errors and Two Gentlemen of Verona, as well as a history play (Henry IV, Part 1), and a few major tragedies—most certainly Romeo and Hamlet. We will also view at least one film adaptation of one of the plays we read. Students will be required to take four examinations (the last one is not a comprehensive final) and write an 8-10 page research paper based on the performance of a Shakespearean play. 

 

463: VICTORIAN FICTION AND PROSE - DR. MOLLY CLARK HILLARD

Surveys British fiction and nonfiction prose in the period 1830-1900

 

489: STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE: WRITING RACE IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICA - DR. ELLEN WEINAUER

“Who ain’t a slave? Tell me that.”

--Ishmael, Moby-Dick

Through the lens of both fiction and non-fiction, this course will examine the developing understanding of “race” in nineteenth-century American literature and culture. Focusing on the debate about the meanings of “blackness” and “whiteness” in particular, we will read a variety of cultural documents—scientific treatises, legal codes and judicial decisions, pro-slavery and abolitionist speeches and journalism—along with contemporary critical and historical works. These readings will provide a cultural context and a critical framework within which to nest our investigation of primary works by both African American and white authors.

Possible primary texts include:

William Wells Brown, Clotel 

Frederick Douglass, The Heroic Slave 

Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl 

Herman Melville, Moby-Dick 

Edgar Allan Poe, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym

Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin 

Frank J. Webb, The Garies and Their Friends 

Harriet Wilson, Our Nig 

Students will write: one shorter essay (5 pages); one longer research essay (12 pages); and weekly response essays.