Undergraduate Courses Spring 2012

313: SURVEY OF MULTIETHNIC LITERATURE - DR. LINDA ALLEN

This course offers a sampling of African American, Native American, Asian American, and Chicano/Latino literature within political, historical, and cultural contexts. Probable texts include: Native Son, American Son, No-No Boy, The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven, Woman Warrior, The Bluest Eye, Interpreter of Maladies, The House on Mango Street, Bless Me, Ultima, Not Vanishing, and/or Light in the Crevice Never Seen.

 

400 (H001) :  SENIOR SEMINAR:  THE AESTHETICS OF FAILURE IN ANGLO-AMERICAN MODERNISM - DR. CHARLES SUMNER

This course will examine why certain major modernist writers define social and interpersonal problems in their works only to leave them unresolved.  It will also explore how and why formal and stylistic innovation, or the modernist need to "make it new," must compensate for thematic irresolution.  Writers covered include Wyndham Lewis, Rebecca West, T.S. Eliot, Ernest Hemingway, Kay Boyle, and Samuel Beckett.

 

400 (H002):  SENIOR SEMINAR:  THE INDIVIDUAL IN POSTWAR NEW YORK ART AND LITERATURE - DR. MONIKA GEHLAWAT

In this seminar, we will read literature written in the post-World War Two era in New York City. Alongside the writing of James Baldwin, Frank O'Hara, J.D. Salinger, Grace Paley, and Donald Barthelme, we will also engage the visual art of the Abstract Expressionists and Andy Warhol. These writers and artists will be examined within the context of the postwar building boom of New York City, the urban studies of Jane Jacobs and Frederic Jameson, and theories of individual subjectivity and perceptual experience.

 

400 (H003):  SENIOR SEMINAR:  RETELLINGS OF GREEK MYTHS - DR. ELIZABETH HARRIS

The class will read major Greek Myths and see how they structure such works as Midsummer Night's Dream to The Hunger Games.

 

401:  COMPOSITION STUDY FOR TEACHERS - DR. KATHERINE COCHRAN

Enrollment restricted to declared licensure majors.  This course is designed to offer a broad but detailed overview of the theory and practice of teaching composition.  We will examine some composition theories (process theory, expressivism, traditional-rhetorical, social constructivism) and their relation to applications in the writing classroom (teaching the process, developing voice, attending to writing correctness, collaborative writing).  The course will look at other issues pertinent to teaching writing, like the use of technology and implementing modes, as well as basic elements like designing writing assignments and grading student writing.  In addition to reading assigned chapters from the texts, students will write sample lesson plans, participate in in-class activities, complete a formal essay via the writing process, maintain a writing portfolio, and write a reflection on an observation at a local school.

 

406:  HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE - DR. STANLEY HAUER

This course surveys the history of English from its rise in Indo-European to its development as present-day English. Several digressions further enlighten the course, such as the history of the alphabet and English spelling, the origin and use of slang, and the differences between British and American English.

There are three midterm and one comprehensive final examinations, plus two short research essays. There is a textbook, a workbook, and a book-length syllabus by the professor.

 

411: STUDIES IN POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE - DR. LINDA ALLEN

This course will provide an introduction to foundational postcolonial theories, and apply these theories to postcolonial literature from the African continent. Possible criticism may include excerpts from Memmi, Fanon, Achebe, Said, Bhabha, and Spivak; possible literature may include Ngugu wa Thiong'o, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Ama Ata Aidoo, J.M. Coetzee, Buchi Emecheta, Mariama Ba, Wole Soyinka, Bessie Head, and/or Sindiwe Magona.

 

413:  SURVEY OF THE MODERN NOVEL - DR. MICHAEL MAYS

This course offers a transnational survey of the modern novel ranging from the later part of the nineteenth century through the middle of the twentieth century. Through writers as diverse as Dostoyevsky, Joyce, Pessoa, and a host of others, we will examine the social, cultural, and political contexts that gave rise to and in turn were shaped by this vital literary form, the modern novel. Class Requirements: In-class essays (50%); Research paper of 15 pages (50%)

 

468:  BRITISH WOMEN WRITERS:  WOMEN IN THE COUNTRY AND THE CITY - DR. NICOLLE JORDAN

How does female identity vary depending on whether it is depicted in a rural or urban setting? Is one setting more congenial to the heroine—or the writer—than another? How does a woman’s experience of the country and/or the city vary depending upon her social status? In this course we will read British poetry, novels, plays, and memoirs that imagine female characters in an array of settings, from the bucolic English countryside, to the bustling social season of London and the bewildering harems of 18th-century Constantinople. We will explore whether a woman’s value, and her values, change depending on the familiarity or strangeness of her surroundings. Authors may include Margaret Cavendish, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Mary Collier, Fanny Burney, Jane Austen, and George Eliot. 

 

475:  STUDIES IN AMERICAN MODERNISM:  MAKE IT NEW:  AMERICAN LITERARY MODERNISM - DR. MAUREEN RYAN

“Around 1922,” wrote Willa Cather, “the world broke apart.”  In America, the literature of the first half of the 20th century attempted to capture—and create—a new century, what came to be called “The American Century.”  It was a period characterized by world wars; prosperity and economic collapse; technological advances; the rise of a mass, popular culture; and a growing sense that human beings are increasingly alienated in a rapidly transforming American society.

Focusing on narratives by American authors of the period, this course will explore “American modernism”—its literary representatives, its agendas, its challenges, its innovations and limitations.  Other cultural texts (film, music, the visual arts, historical material) will contextualize and complement the literary texts. 

 

476:  AMERICAN LITERATURE AFTER 1945:  MORAL ENVIRONMENTS IN CONTEMPORARY NORTH AMERICAN LITERATURE - DR. MARTINA SCIOLINO

Moral Environments in Contemporary North American Literature. 

We will read two works by three notable American authors and consider the impact of accelerated environmental disorder on the aesthetic development of each writer: Margaret Atwood (Oryx and Crake, The Year of the Flood), Don DeLillo (White Noise, Cosmopolis) and Linda Hogan (Power, The Book of Medicines).

 

485:  SURVEY OF LITERATURE OF THE SOUTH - DR. KATHERINE COCHRAN

This course explores southern literature from its origins in the eighteenth century to the present, including discussions of slave narrative, southwest humor, local color, the Southern Renascence, and recent southern fiction.  The poetry, short fiction, and play readings will be selected from The Literature of the American South: A Norton Anthology, in addition to three novels: William Wells Brown’s Clotel: Or, The President’s Daughter, William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury, and Dorothy Allison’s Bastard Out of Carolina.  Students will participate in class discussion and activities, write three response papers, and complete a final research project on a southern writer not covered in class.