Undergraduate Courses Summer 2011

497/597: BRITISH STUDIES: CLASSICS OF BRITISH CHILDREN’S LITERATURE - DR. ERIC TRIBUNELLA

This four-week, six-credit course will combine a survey of classic works of British children’s literature with visits to places related to the texts or their authors. We will read works such as Alice's Adventures in Wonderland; The Secret Garden; Peter Pan; The Wind in the Willows; The Hobbit; and The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. The class will tour London, Oxford, Edinburgh, and the Lake District and study the role of place and landscape in children's literature and the notion of literary tourism.


301: ENGLISH GRAMMAR - DR. JAMEELA LARES

This course takes a structural rather than a traditional approach to grammar, though it does look some at both traditional and transformational-generative grammars. We look at how language works and how social attitudes affect it. Course requirements: regular attendance and participation, careful reading of the text and working through exercises, frequent short writing assignments and/or quizzes, short research paper on a linguistic issue, midterm, and final. Required text: Klammer, Schultz, and Della Volpe, Analyzing English Grammar, Sixth Edition (Longman, 2009), ISBN 978-0-205-68594-3.


311 MINISESSION (May 16-May 27): SURVEY OF CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE: STUDIES IN POSTMODERNISM - DR. MONIKA GEHLAWAT

In this mini-session, we will use the longer class period to apply an interdisciplinary approach to the study of periodization and postmodernism specifically as it is developed through contemporary literature. Beginning with a brief introduction to the Modernist movement, its key figures and central ideological premises, we will move on to focus on the theory and values of postmodernism specifically. How does it overlap with but represent potentially different concerns from the broader historical category of contemporary literature? What is its relationship to late Modernism and post-9/11 literature? Can modernist art persist in a postmodern era? How does postmodernist work speak to sixties social movements, the emerging awareness of social and cultural others, and the landscape of late capitalism? These and other questions will inform our study of major contemporary authors including J.D. Salinger, Don Delillo, Junot Diaz, and Grace Paley, as well as concurrent movements in the arts such as the French New Wave, New Journalism, Pop Art and Conceptualism, and the architecture of Frank Gehry. 


321: FICTION WRITING II

Prerequisite: ENG 221. Stresses the techniques of short fiction writing


322: POETRY WRITING II

Prerequisite: ENG 222. Stresses the techniques of poetry writing


350: BRITISH LITERATURE I - DR. ELIZABETH HARRIS 

Surveys major British literature from the Old English period to the Romantic period


351: BRITISH LITERATURE II - DR. KENNETH WATSON

Surveys major British literature from Romantic period to the present


370: AMERICAN LITERATURE I - DR. LUIS IGLESIAS

Surveys American literature from its beginnings to the Civil War

 

371: AMERICAN LITERATURE II - DR. KENNETH WATSON

Surveys American literature from the Civil War to the present


418: ADOLESCENT LITERATURE - DR. JAMEELA LARES

This course examines the twentieth-century phenomenon of YA or young adult literature in terms of its themes, concerns, and literary constructions, particularly in YA novels. We will also be looking at the history, construction, and perception of the adolescent and teenager in American culture. Although our main approach to the texts will be literary and historical, we will also keep in mind how our analyses bear upon the use of YA material in secondary school instruction. Course texts will likely include some classics The Catcher in the Rye along with an array of various narrative genres, including the verse novel and the graphic novel. Course requirements for undergraduates: thoughtful reading of texts, regular attendance and participation in seminar discussions (20%); weekly written responses to reading (20%); a written report with an oral presentation of an ancillary reading (10%); a meaningful recitation of a memorized passage (10%); and a seminar paper (40%). Written assignments represent an aggregate of at least 5,000 words of revised prose. Course requirements for graduates will include a more extensive presentation to the class and more extensive written responses.


459: MILTON - DR. JAMEELA LARES

A seminar exploring the genius and message of one of England’s greatest poets. We will be particularly be looking at ways to negotiate the differences from our own experiences and culture as we look at his. If you doubt you will like this course, read any 200 lines of Paradise Lost aloud to yourself–you will be amazed. Course texts: John Milton: Complete Shorter Poems (ed. Revard) andJohn Milton: Paradise Lost (ed. Lewalski), and Areopagitica and Of Education (Crofts Classics, ed. Sabine). Course requirements for undergraduates: Thoughtful reading of texts, regular attendance and participation in seminar discussions (20%); weekly written responses to reading (20%); a written report with an oral presentation of an ancillary reading (10%); a meaningful recitation of a memorized passage (10%); and a seminar paper (40%). Written assignments represent an aggregate of at least 5,000 words of revised prose. Course requirements for graduates will include a more extensive presentation to the class and more extensive written responses. Note that Paradise Lost is on the reading list for the graduate examination in August.


473: STUDIES IN AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE: RICHARD WRIGHT, MISSISSIPPI’S NATIVE SON - DR. SHERITA JOHNSON (5WK1 SESSION: MAY 31 - JUNE 28)

In 2008, we celebrated the centennial of Richard Wright, Mississippi’s own “native son.” Wright is an acclaimed author of several novels, short stories, autobiography, and political commentary. This class is designed as an introduction to the life and literature of Richard Wright. Our study will focus on a few selections from his canon. Literary criticism, film, and a variety of other materials will be used to supplement our readings of the primary texts. Students will have to keep a reading journal, write several short analysis papers, and a final research paper.


489: STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE: 19th CENTURY POPULAR FICTION - DR. LUIS IGLESIAS

Cannibals, Murder, Kidnapping, Rape, Vampires and a good dose of violence – No this is not the new season of HBO’s True Blood, but rather the plots of popular novels and short stories in early 19th Century American. In fact, beneath the veneer of the Victorian and sentimental values that dominated the period, there existed an exciting and dramatic appetite for the sensational that fed the expanding literary marketplace of the growing nation. Our course will read a range of works, some still popular and others mostly forgotten, that not only sold extremely well during the Antebellum period, but also helped define the careers of many of the period’s authors. Moreover, in reading and exploring these works, we will undercover the social, racial, and sexual tensions that shaped the decades before the Civil War, as the nation sought to define itself. The course will also track the rise of the popular press, whose economic and cultural impact on the nation played an important role in the emergence of a national literature.

Among the works we will read:

Susanna Rowson, Charlotte Temple
Washington Irving, The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon
James Fenimore Cooper, The Last of the Mohicans
Herman Melville, Typee
Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin
Edgar Allan Poe, Tales of the Arabesque
Nathaniel Hawthorne, Twice-Told Tales