Undergraduate Courses Summer 2012

 

110 H001 & H002 (ONLINE): BASIC GRAMMAR - DR. MICHAEL SALDA

ENG 110, Basic Grammar, is an online course that provides a structured learning environment in which students have the opportunity to master the grammar, mechanics, and conventions of standard English usage.  It is a "nuts and bolts" grammar course that focuses on subject/verb agreement, pronoun use, voice, tense, phrase and clause positioning, parallelism, and punctuation.

 

203 H005 (5-WK 1): WORLD LITERATURE - DR. JAMEELA LARES

This section of 203 will focus on older World Lit (i.e., through the Renaissance) plus a contrast with modernism via Kafka's "The Metamorphosis."

 

203 H006 & H007 (5-WK 1): WORLD LITERATURE - DR. MORGAN FRITZ

"Community, Happiness, and Conflict in World Literature"

This Summer World Literature course will explore themes of Community, Happiness, and Conflict from ancient Greece to the present. We’ll consider how literature helps us think about fundamental human questions such as the pursuit of happiness and interpersonal conflict, as well as the relationships between such themes and different types of communities. Readings will include Sophocles’s Oedipus Rex and Thomas More’s Utopia (and Ahmed Towfik’s thriller of the same name). We will conclude with an analysis of Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather informed by our reading of great works of literature.

 

203 H009 (5-WK 1): WORLD LITERATURE - DR. ELLEN WEINAUER

"Worlds at War"

Our examination of “World Literature” will focus on works that treat the idea of war—a major theme of written and oral literatures in all places, times, and cultures.   As we examine texts ranging from Homer’s Iliad to short stories about the war in Vietnam, we will ask ourselves what writers, both ancient and contemporary, have had to say about such critical matters as heroism, patriotism, authority, faith, love and hate, life and death.  We will supplement our readings with occasional films.

 

370 (5-WK 1): SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE: BEGINNINGS TO 1865 - DR. ELLEN WEINAUER

This course will offer a chronological survey of various forms of literary production in America before 1865.  Beginning with narratives of exploration and contact and ending with a brief look at poetry of the American Civil War, we will read and write about a variety of topics—from slavery to Native American identity, from gender roles to immigration and industrialization—in a variety of genres—sermons and tracts, autobiographies and short stories, novels and poems.  

 

371 (5-WK 2): SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE II: CIVIL WAR TO THE PRESENT - DR. MONIKA GEHLAWAT

In this class, we will consider late 19th and 20th century literature in terms of modernism and postmodernism, while specifically investigating the status of individual subjectivity in this period and how it is represented by changing formal movements in American literature. We will read works by Henry James, Wallace Stevens, Ernest Hemingway, James Baldwin, and Joyce Carol Oates, among others. In addition to reading across a wide variety of genres, we will also consider this literature alongside art and cultural developments that were contemporaneous with the literature (for example, Cubism, Abstract Expressionism, the Civil Rights Movement).

 

445 (MINISESSION): BRITISH CHILDREN'S FANTASY - DR. JAMEELA LARES

This mini-session seminar will benefit from a concentrated schedule to inquire into the meaning and implications of this important genre. In our attempt to define the parameters of British children’s fantasy, we will ask ourselves about its true audience, its motifs, its methodologies, and its impact, while we read tales and shorter works by British fantasists Andrew Lang, Lewis Carroll, John Ruskin, Charles Kingsley, George Macdonald, E. Nesbit, Rudyard Kipling, J. M. Barrie, J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, Lucy M. Boston, Joan Aiken, K. M. Briggs, John Masefield, Elizabeth Goudge, Eva Ibbotsen, Diana Wynne Jones, and Eoin Colfer. Each seminar member will be further contributing to our range of knowledge by reporting on a longer work of fantasy and on a critical article or chapter. As a 400-level English course, this seminar will require at least 5000 words of revised prose, which we will articulate as 2000 words of written responses over the two-week session, and either the 500-word report on a longer work of fantasy or on the critical article or chapter; an additional 500-word report on the other option will be due following the close of the session, with a 2000-word researched seminar paper due at the end of the first summer semester in June. Seminar members will share these later productions via the internet. Other requirements: regular reading, attendance, and class participation.

 

473 (5-WK 1): STUDIES IN AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE - DR. SHERITA JOHNSON

"(Re-)Discovering a Tradition: African American Women Writers, 1990s-1890s"

When Alice Walker went “looking for Zora” in an overgrown cemetery, she was on a personal quest to honor the dead writer Zora Neale Hurston.  Through her scholarly efforts, however, Walker also rediscovered a literary foremother. Our own journey of (re)discovering the tradition of African American women writers will begin with the hip hop generation’s inheritance of a legacy, no longer discarded, which extends back through writings by black women during the feminist, Civil Rights, and Black Power Movements, the Harlem Renaissance, and the “Black Woman’s Era” of the 1890s. 

 

474: STUDIES IN EARLY AMERICAN LITERATURE - DR. LUIS IGLESIAS

"Saints, Sinners, and Scientists:  Writing the New World"

From the moment America was “discovered” it fundamentally challenged the European vision of the world both in a physical and theological sense. Responding to and inspired by a new environment and geography, early American writers found their religious convictions and emergent scientific interests challenged. In the process, writers before, during, and after the settlement of what would become The United States made sense of this New World in variety of conflicted ways, fueled by not only the colonial enterprise but also the imagination. This course will examine a variety of texts – from exploration accounts and religious texts to imaginative narratives – that helped shape the idea of America, often before the fact, refashioning both a European and Creole understanding and representation of North America and its colonization.

Among the writers we will read:

  • Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca
  • Thomas Harriot
  • William Bradford
  • Anne Bradstreet
  • Jonathan Edwards
  • Benjamin Franklin
  • Olaudah Equiano
  • Charles Brockden Brown

 

489 (JULY MINISESSION): STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE - DR. KATE COCHRAN

"The South in Literature & Film"

This course is designed to provide insight into how the South has been portrayed in American film, from its first appearance in The Birth of a Nation (1915) to the recent blockbuster The Help (2011).  We will be supplementing our viewing of eight primary films with a variety of clips from other films, twelve theoretical and critical articles, and brief, focused lectures.  The course is arranged by topic, rather than chronologically, and examines some of the major tropes in movies about the South: the Civil War, racism and civil rights, mystery and horror, female bonding, religion, and multiculturalism.

Each four-hour class period will be broken into two parts: in the first half, a feature film will be shown.  In the second half, whole-class discussion, lecture, group and individual activities will be accompanied by various short film clips.  In addition to viewing the films, students will be expected to keep a reading journal on the articles, participate in class discussion and activities, and write a researched essay on a novel from which one of the films was adapted.