Undergraduate Courses Summer 2013

ENG 110 ONLINE: BASIC GRAMMAR - DR. MICHAEL SALDA

ENG 110, Basic Grammar, is an online course that provides a structured learning environment in which students have the opportunity to master the grammar, mechanics, and conventions of standard English usage.  It is a "nuts and bolts" grammar course that focuses on subject/verb agreement, pronoun use, voice, tense, phrase and clause positioning, parallelism, and punctuation. 


ENG 311: CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE - DR. LUIS IGLESIAS

"Worlds Elsewhere: Contemporary Science Fiction"

Whether traveling through space or time (or both), science fiction writing frequently takes readers to worlds elsewhere, imagining possibilities remote but scientifically plausible. Along the way, SyFy novels explore and interrogate our reality through the lens of imaginative and speculative fiction. Indeed, the novels we will read and the worlds they inhabit not only reveal and inquire into issues of race, class, and gender, which are true to our current understanding of the world we live in; but also these works envision new possibilities as well as sound dire warnings. To paraphrase: throughout the semester we will “explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go” to worlds elsewhere to better understand our own.

Among our readings:

  • “Nightfall,” Isaac Asimov
  • The Martian Chronicles, Ray Bradbury
  • Dawn (Xenogensis, I), Octavia Butler
  • The Einstein Intersection, Samuel R. Delany
  • Dune, Frank Herbert
  • The Left Hand of Darkness, Ursula K. Le Guin
  • Solaris, Stanislaw Lem

Please contact Prof. Iglesias with questions: Luis.Iglesias@usm.edu

 

ENG 332: ADVANCED COMPOSITION - PROFESSOR BRINN STRANGE

ENG 332 (H001) offered in Summer 2013 will focus on sustainable culture and employ active learning to provide undergraduate students with the opportunity to conduct academic research about, with, and for the local community.

Students will hone their analytical and argumentative skilld that allows them to consider their relationship to our community, the environment, and various aspects of sustainability—in significant ways. Readings will include a practice-oriented textbook on rhetorical analysis and research, as well as Barbara Kingsolver’s biographical/journalistic novel Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life and various other readings that discuss America’s relationship to the environment from numerous perspectives. Students will use a variety of writing styles—from memoirs to profiles to academic and field research.

 

ENG 371: AMERICAN LITERATURE 2 - DR. MONIKA GEHLAWAT

In this survey of late nineteenth and twentieth century American literature, we will read authors who anticipated, produced and were influenced by modernist literature. The class will approach its study of writers like Henry James, Ernest Hemingway, Marianne Moore and James Baldwin (among others) with an eye toward periodization in order to better understand the significance of modernism and postmodernism in twentieth century American art and literature. We will look at painting and other art forms in order to contextualize these major authors and their aesthetic innovations while considering the ways in which American writers often gained from the transatlantic journey abroad.

 

ENG 418:ADOLESCENT LITERATURE - DR. JAMEELA LARES

COURSE DESCRIPTION: a writing-intensive seminar exploring the twentieth-century phenomenon of YA or young adult literature in terms of its themes, concerns, and literary constructions, particularly in YA novels. We will also be looking at the history, construction, and perception of the adolescent and teenager in American culture. Although our main approach to the texts will be literary and historical, we will also keep in mind how our analyses might bear upon the use of YA material in secondary school instruction.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: thoughtful reading of texts, regular attendance and participation in seminar discussions (20%); regular blog posts and responses on Blackboard (20%); a written report and oral presentation on an additional YA title that is new to you (10%); a written report and oral presentation on one of the histories of YA Lit (10%); and a researched seminar paper (40%). Note that this course, like all 400-level English courses, is writing intensive, meaning that written assignments represent an aggregate of at least 5,000 words of revised prose. I would prefer to maintain the course requirements as here stated; however, if it becomes clear that you are not sufficiently engaging the material, we will also have a midterm and/or final examination, with readjusted grading weights.

READINGS:

Themes

  • Trites, Disturbing the Universe: Power and Repression in Adolescent Literature (U of Iowa), 978-0877458579. $19.00

Histories

  • Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables (Modern Library, 2008), 978-0812979039. $9.00.
  • Salinger, Catcher in the Rye (1951; Back Bay, 2001), 9780316769174. $13.99.
  • Hinton, The Outsiders (1967; Puffin, 2006), 9780142407332. $10.00.

Issues           

  • Crutcher, Whale Talk (2001; Harper, 2009), 9780061771316. $9.99.
  • Forman, If I Stay (2009; Speak, 2010), 978-0142415436 $8.99.

Issues and Genres

  • Jones, Fire and Hemlock (1985; Firebird, 2012). 978-0142420140. $9.99.
  • Alexie, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian (Little Brown, 2009), 9780316013697.  $14.99.
  • Sones, One of those Hideous Books Where the Mother Dies (Simon & Schuster, 2004), 9781416907886.  $7.99.
  • Brosgol, Anya’s Ghost (First Second, 2011), 978-1596435520. $15.99.

 

ENG 441: TOPICS IN LITERARY THEORY - DR. MARTINA SCIOLINO

"The Discursive Earth"

The class explores a rhetorical space where activist and imaginative literature overlap, where authors through various means represent the interests of the earth and conceive of a sustainable balance between its human and nonhuman inhabitants.   We’ll read theoretical essays by both classic and contemporary environmentalists as we consider such questions as: who may speak for the earth? How do ethnicity and bioregion inform each other? What are the consequences of understanding nonhuman life as “the commons?”  No previous experience in literary theory is required beyond ENG 340.