Projects - Landscape Ecology/Quantitative Ecology Laboratory

Effect of Sea Level Rise on Spatial Distribution of Coastal Wetlands

The impact of sea level rise on spatial distribution of coastal wetlands in the lower Pascagoula River Basin was modeled using SLAMM, the Sea Level Rise Affecting Marshes Model. (Parker et al., 1989) Two scenarios of sea level rise were examined: a low rise rate of 0.10 inch/year and a high rise rate of 0.83 inch/year. The rates are based on information from the Mississippi Department of Marine Resources in 2011. The 2007 map is from National Wetlands Inventory data.

2007, base condition
Key for all simulation maps

High Rate of Rise Scenario

2050, High Rate of Rise Scenario
2100, High Rate of Rise Scenario

Low Rate of Rise Scenario

2050, Low Rate of Rise Scenario
2100, Low Rate of Rise Scenario

Impervious Surfaces

Drs. Chongfeng Gong and Wei Wu have developed a sub-pixel algorithm to model changes in impervious areas on the Mississippi Gulf Coast based on remote sensing imagery. The area of impervious surfaces, such as buildings and parking lots, is further linked to coastal habitat quality over time. Impervious areas increase stormwater runoff and materials carried directly to rivers and estuarine waters. The figures below show the result of an analysis of the change in impervious areas within and near Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve.

Chongfeng Gong is measuring leaf area index (LAI) using AccuPAR LP-80 ceptometer at the Pointe-Aux-Chenes salt marsh, Louisisana. LAI is useful to link ground biomass with vegetation index derived from remote sensing imagery.
Percentage of impervious area in southeastern Mississippi near Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve in 1984 using a sub-pixel algorithm regression tree.
Chongfeng Gong is measuring leaf area index (LAI) using AccuPAR LP-80 ceptometer at the Pointe-Aux-Chenes salt marsh, Louisisana. LAI is useful to link ground biomass with vegetation index derived from remote sensing imagery.
Percentage of impervious area in southeastern Mississippi near Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve in 2011 using a sub-pixel algorithm regression tree.