Marine Microbial Ecology

D. Jay Grimes, Ph.D.

The Marine Microbial Ecology Laboratory encompasses culture-based and non-culture-based (molecular) research as well as public service isolation and identification of bacteria from oysters and other marine animals.

A group of cobia following a whale shark.

The Grimes Lab – Back row, left to right: Dr. Jay Grimes, Misty Fiello (Beach Monitoring Technician), Dawn Rebarchik (Head, Shellfish Sanitation and Beach Monitoring), Corey Russo (Ph.D. student), Shuo “Eagle” Shen (Ph.D. student).
Front row, left to right: Mercedes Taylor (Lab Manager), Rachelle Williams (M.S. student), Becky Hardgrove (Shellfish Sanitation technician). Not pictured: Delilah Justiniano.


The laboratory houses the following equipment: Zeiss Axiostar Plus compound microscope equipped for brightfield, darkfield, and epifluorescence microscopy and fitted with an AxioCam MRc digital camera and a Prior Lumen 200 light source; Eppendorf 5430R microfuge; Roche LightCycler 480II, Cepheid SmartCycler II workstation with two blocks; denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) system with UVP BioDoc-It imaging; standard-size horizontal electrophoresis system; pH meter; balances; bead beater; vortexer; centrifuges; shaking water bath (operates at ambient 5 to 100°C); analog shaker; micropipetters; filtered PCR enclosure; fume hood; Biolog MicroLog Generation II identification system; incubator (37°C); refrigeration (0 to 4°C); two freezers (-20°C); blenders; Millipore de-ionized water dispenser. Also available are utoclaves, ice machines, additional incubators, a membrane filter station, microarray scanner (Bio-Rad VersArray ChipReader), and a -80°C freezer.

Field equipment includes: an Eckman sediment dredge, a small 9-tooth oyster dredge, oyster tongs, YSI model 30 salinometer, refractometers, pH meter, GPS, two Wildco horizontal bota water samplers, and two General Oceanics butterfly aseptic samplers.

Epifluorescence microscope and digital camera connected to a computerized image analysis system help in the identification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

Epifluorescence microscope and digital camera
connected to a computerized image analysis
system help in the identification of
Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

Microbiology personnel collect oysters with a small research dredge.

Microbiology personnel collect oysters
with a small research dredge.

 

A graduate student lifts DNA from colonies of bacteria, a step in the search for Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

A graduate student lifts DNA from colonies of
bacteria, a step in the search for Vibrio parahaemolyticus.


Biolog System and Roche LightCycler, provides
Roche LightCycler, provides various methods for gene detection, gene expression analysis, genetic variation analysis, and array data validation.
UVP BioDoc-It, enables simple documentation
UVP BioDoc-It, enables simple documentation
of fluorescent and non-fluorescent gels, membranes, blots, film plates, and assays. Also shown is the Cepheid SmartCycler II which is the "workhorse" for routine gene detection.