Helping Your Children with Writing

  • 
 Ask 
your
 child 
to 
describe 
things 
to 
you 
using
 details
 so 
that
 you
 can
 imagine 
the 
item 
in 
your 
mind.

 It 
might be 
fun to 
draw
 what 
he 
is
 describing 
and 
then 
reverse 
the 
roles‐‐you 
describe,
 he draws.


  • 
Allow 
your
 child
 to choose 
a 
small 
composition 
notebook 
to
 use
 as 
a
 journal.

 This 
should 
be 
private 
space,
 not 
something
 you 
look
 at 
and
 correct.

 Encourage 
her
 to
 write 
down 
interesting 
words 
she 
sees
 or
 hears,
 descriptions 
of
 interesting
 things 
she 
sees 
as 
she 
plays 
or
 travels,
 dialogue 
she 
overhears. 

Ask
 her 
to
 combine 
drawing
 with
 writing. 

Occasionally
 ask
 if
 she 
has
 something 
in 
her 
journal
 that
 she
 would
 like 
to 
share.

 After 
you hear 
her 
read, 
do not
 suggest
 improvements. 

Just 
say,
 "Thank
 you."


  • Suggest 
that 
your
 child 
write
 to relatives
 who 
live 
in 
other 
towns 
or
 states.

 Don't 
require 
long 
letters;
 allow 
him 
to
 write 
short 
notes.

 Remember 
that
 grandparents 
love 
anything 
a 
grandchild
 writes.


  • Write
 stories 
together. 

Use 
pictures
 from
 the 
Internet, 
or
 even
 better,
 take 
your 
own. Photograph 
unusual 
things 
and 
then 
create
 unusual 
stories 
to 
match.


  • Read,
read,
read!


  • Learn 
new words 
together.

 If you
 choose 
the words 
together 
and
 then 
practice
 using 
them throughout
 the
 week, the
 words
 will 
be
 fully 
integrated 
into your child's
 vocabulary.

 Only
 choose
 one
 or
 two 
words per 
week.

 Involve
 the 
entire
 family
 for 
even 
more 
fun.


  • Allow your 
child
 to 
talk, 
and 
spend
 time
 really 
listening
 to 
him.

 Part
 of 
being 
fluid 
with
 language
 involves 
being 
able 
to
 express
 ideas
 in
 speaking
 and 
writing.

 Wait just 
a
 few
 minutes 
before 
insisting
 that
 he
 play
 the
 quiet
 game.