Course Offerings - Summer and Fall 2014

SUMMER 2014

 

 

HIS 370 – H001  Mississippi History

Professor Max Grivno

Reg. Code 3740 Session 5W1

MWF 11:20-12:50 and TTH 10:20-12:30

 

This course offers a broad overview of Mississippi
History from the begins of human migration to the Gulf Coast region through the
Civil Rights Movement.  The course is
divided into three sections.  The first,
“Chiefdoms, Confederacies, and Empires in the Gulf South,” examines the
earliest inhabitants of present-day Mississippi and traces the evolution of
human societies during the Paleo-Indian, Archaic, Woodland, and Mississippi
periods.  It explores the rise and fall
of the Mississippian civilizations and considers the impact of the De Soto
expedition of 1539-1542.  It then moves
to a discussion of the Natchez, Chickasaw, and Choctaw confederacies and their
struggles to maintain their independence in the face of encroachment from the
English, the French, the Spanish, and later the Americans.  The second section, “The Rise and Fall of a
Slave Society,” begins with the explosive growth of Mississippi’s cotton and
slave economies during the “Flush Times” of the 1830s and concludes with the
Civil War.  It examines the spread of
Jacksonian democracy in Mississippi and attempts to unravel the tangle of class
and race relations that connected planters, poor whites, free blacks, and
slaves.  The section also considers the
causes of secession and the effects of the Civil War on Mississippi.  The final section, “From Reconstruction to
Freedom Summer,” examines African Americans’ struggle for freedom and political
rights from the 1860s to the 1960s.  It
looks at the successes and failures of Reconstruction, the Constitution of
1890, the implementation of “Jim Crow” segregation, and the beginnings of the
Civil Rights Movement.

 

 

 

 

HIS 375 – H001  Economic HIS US

Professor Louis Kyriakoudes

Reg. Code 4938 Session 5W2

MWF 11:20-2:30

 

This course examines the development of
American capitalism as a system of ordering production from the colonial period
to very recent times. Combining cultural and social history with traditional
business and economic history, the course develops four themes: the creative
force of entrepreneurship in the American economy, the transformation and
development of the business firm, the role of economic activity in American
life and culture, and the changing role of government in business and the
economy.

 

We will read Michael Lind, Land
of Promise
 and Pietra Rivoli, The Travels of a T-Shirt in the
Global Economy
 and well as shorter works.

 

Evaluation will be based upon two
midterm examinations, a final examination, four reaction papers and one
in-class presentation.

 

 

HIS 474 – H001  AM Indians I

Ms. Alice Ivas

Reg. Code 5279 Session 5W1

MWF 11:20-2:30

 

The
Invasion of America

 

This
course examines the European colonization of America from the native
perspective. It surveys the diversity of the Native American experience
from Spanish entradas of the 1530s to
Indian Removal in the 1830s. Course goals are to balance the traditional
narrative of American westward expansion with native perspective of foreign
invasion, and to teach students how to incorporate archaeological and
ethnohistorical sources into historical analysis.

 

 

HIS 479 – H002  Topics AM HIS

Professor Kevin Greene

Reg. Code 4939 Session 5W1

MWF 11:20-2:30

 

American
popular music continues to evolve everyday as new styles emerge and others
disappear.  And yet as they disappear
they leave an indelible mark on American history, culture, and identity.  This class investigates the interaction of
American popular music with African American history and both personal and
community identity development. Throughout the semester we will attempt to
answer a series of historical questions as we read about and listen to American
popular music. How do artists draw on the past to create vibrant new musical
styles?  How do Americans’ visions of
“authentic” musical roots reflect their ideas about race, class, and identity?  How does music transform to become more than
a creative aesthetic medium; how does it become a sensory and intellectual
touchstone to the past? In this course, we will look at and listen to case
studies in blues, rock, rap, jazz, soul, funk, punk, folk, and country, and how
these styles have helped shaped our identities and our understanding of
American history. 

 

Course Readings

 

Altschuler,
Glen.  All Shook Up How Rock ‘n’ Roll Changed America

ISBN-13: 978-0195177497

 

Brackett,
David, The Pop, Rock, and Soul Reader:
Histories and Debates, 2009.

ISBN-13:  978-0199811700

 

Rose,
Tricia. The Hip Hop Wars: What We Talk
About When We Talk About Hip Hop—and Why It Matters.
ISBN-13: 978-0465008971

 

Porter,
Lewis.  John Coltrane: His Life and Music (The Michigan American Music
Series) ISBN:
978-0472086436

 

Wald,
Elijah.  Escaping the Delta: Robert Johnson and the Invention of the Blues.

ISBN-13: 978-0060524272

 

 

FALL 2014

 

 

HIS 300 – H001  Research
Seminar

Professor Brian LaPierre

Reg. Code 1535

MWF 9:00-9:50

This course is a boot camp in the basic skills of
the historian’s craft. During the course of a rigorous semester, raw students
will be transformed into refined historians who can interpret sources
critically, argue their positions rationally and write clearly and
persuasively. In order to demonstrate their successful metamorphosis, students
will be expected to participate actively in class, complete a number of
assignments and exercises and to formulate, research, write and rewrite a major
historical paper and present it to their classmates. Do you have what it takes
to be one of the few and the proud? Take this course and find out.

Course Texts

Mary
Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing
in History
(New York: Bedford/St.

Martin’s,
2009), ISBN: 9780312535032.

William Strunk, Jr. and E. B. White, The
Elements of Style 
(New York: Longman,                                      1999), ISBN: 978-0205313426.

 

 

 

HIS 300 – H002  Research
Seminar

Professor Susannah Ural

Reg. Code 3423

MWF 10:00-10:50

 

This is a required course for history majors to learn how to
"do" history.  Students will be
working with primary sources, beginning with a discussion of what these are,
and learning how to find them, and how to use these sources.  Students will review approved books and
websites, as well as research and write a major paper.  They will critique each other’s work and
present their own projects to the class. 
At semester’s end, they will have significantly enhanced their skills in
reading comprehension, analytical writing (in brief and lengthy formats), oral
presentations, and computer and archival research.

 

Stephen
King, On Writing.  Any edition
is fine, but Pocket Paperback, 2002 looks to be the cheapest ISBN
978-0743455961

William
Kelleher Storey, Writing History: A Guide for Students, 4th EDITION (New
York: Oxford University Press, 2013) MUST BE THIS EDITION. ISBN 0199830045

Kate L. Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Research
Papers, Theses, and Dissertations,
8th Edition (Chicago: University of
Chicago Press, 2013), 0226816389

 

 

HIS 300 – H003  Research
Seminar

Professor Louis Kyriakoudes

Reg. Code 5849

TTH 9:30-10:45

 

This course introduces
students to the philosophy of history, and the methods and materials of
historical research. We will explore how to design, research, and write a
historical research paper. Evaluation will be based upon a series of short
research exercises and a ten-page paper based upon

 

 

 

HIS 307 – H001  Africa 1500
– Present

Professor
Douglas Chambers

Reg. Code
6556

TTH
9:30-10:45

 

This course is a general survey of Sub-Saharan
African history from about 1500 CE to the Present, and will enable
upper-division students to explore key themes in the changing experience of the
continent and its peoples since the early modern era. There will be three
book review essays on topics ranging from "Warfare in Atlantic
Africa" to "Colonial Africa" to "Post-modern
Conflicts," as well as a Midterm Exam Reflection Essay, and a Final Exam
Reflection Essay, among other assigments. The required textbook by Kevin
Shillington emphasizes the importance of African perspectives on the history of
the continent, as does the instructor. The course will be a mix of lectures,
discussions, and presentations.

 

 

 

HIS 326 – H001  Christianity & Roman Empire

Professor Miles Doleac

Reg. Code 9097

TTH 2:25-3:40

 

This course traces the origins and development of Christianity
from Jesus of Nazareth (c. 5 BCE-29 CE) until Gregory I (r. 590-604 CE).
Special emphasis will be placed on understanding the primary sources in their
historical/cultural context, evaluating the many different “versions” of
pre-Nicene Christianity and scrutinizing major instances of change and
continuity in Christian thought and practice across Christianity’s first six
centuries.

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS/GRADE BREAKDOWN:

Four discussion papers (c. five pages each): 50 %

In-class quizzes: 10%

Class participation: 20%

Take-home Final Examination: 20%

 

 

HIS 331 – H001  Later Medieval Europe

Professor Courtney
Luckhardt

Reg. Code 10293

MWF 11:00-11:50

 

        This
course is designed as an in depth examination of high and later medieval
European history, roughly 1000 – 1450 AD.   In this class, we shall see
the development and flowering of new medieval cultures as well as the various
crises that they encountered.  Our goal will be to trace the development
of communities and cultures; social relations and economic conditions;
political, religious and intellectual institutions and thought. Or principal
goal will be to acquire an informed understanding of certain topics and themes,
from the role of the Christian church and secular authority in political
systems, the ideological and cultural function of belief systems, to the nature
of medieval source material, especially historical texts, religious texts, and
material culture (archaeology).

      This is an upper-division history course designed for advanced
students, both majors and non-majors.  As
such, analyzing and writing about primary sources will form a significant
component of student work in this course. 
Indeed, the analysis of primary sources is at the heart of historical
inquiry and the course assignments will reflect this focus.  The course assignments include short essays,
a research project focused on medieval letter collections, a final exam, and
class discussion. 

Readings in the course
include:


  1. Robert Bartlett, The
    Making of Europe
    (Princeton, 1993)

  2. R.I Moore, The
    Formation of a Persecuting Society
    , 2nd ed. (Blackwell, 2007)

  3. Nigel Saul, Oxford
    Illustrated History of Medieval England
    (Oxford, 2001)

  4. Joinville and Villehardoin, Chronicles of the Crusades (Penguin, 2009)

  5. Abelard and
    Heloise, The Letters and Other Writings
    , ed. Levitan (Hackett, 2007).

 

 

 

HIS 333 – H001  Europe in 19th Century

Professor Andrew Ross

Reg. Code 9980

TTH 10:00-10:50

 

This course
traces the political, social, and cultural history of Europe over the
"long" nineteenth century (1789-1914). The major theme of the course
is the concept of European "modernity." During the nineteenth
century, Europeans came to see themselves as standing at the height of
civilization. And yet, the nineteenth century ended with the slaughterhouse of
World War I. This course traces this contradiction as it explores the ways in
which Europe wrestled with both the promises and problems that emerged in the
wake of the French and Industrial Revolutions. Topics covered include the rise
of liberalism and socialism, cultural movements such as Romanticism and
modernism, the emergence of nationalism and the nation-state, the 1848
Revolutions, the unification of Germany and Italy, the "Eastern
Question," imperialism and the rise of racial sciences, changing relations
of class, gender, and sexuality, the emergence of mass culture and mass
politics, and the origins of World War I.

 

Required Texts:

Winks,
Robin and Joan Neuberger. Europe and the
Making of Modernity
. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005. ISBN-10:
0195156226

Hunt,
Lynn. The French Revolution and Human
Rights: A Brief Documentary History
. New York: Bedford/St. Martin's, 1996.
ISBN-10: 0312108028

Dickens,
Charles. Hard Times. Mineola: Dover
Publications, 2001. ISBN-10: 0486419207

Conrad,
Joseph. Heart of Darkness. New York:
Penguin, 2007. ISBN-10: 0141441674

Smith,
Helmut Waler. The Butcher's Tale: Murder
and Anti-Semitism in a German Town
. New York: W.W. Norton, 2003. ISBN-10:
0393325059

Additional
primary and secondary sources will be provided online and/or in-class.

 

Class Assignments:

4
Quizzes (30%)

2 Short
Essays (30%)

1 Group
Oral Presentation (25%)

Attendance
and Participation (15%)

 

 

 

HIS 360 – H001  Modern Military History

Professor Kenneth Swope

Reg. Code 9980

TTH 11:00-12:15

 

This
course will present an overview of global military history from the French
Revolution to the present.  Students will
learn about major wars, campaigns, battles and military figures and learn how
these events and people were connected to larger events and processes.  Special attention will be devoted to the
relationship between war and society and to the experience of combat.  Students will read a variety of primary and
secondary sources, including several personal memoirs written by those who
experienced war first-hand.  Assignments
include a short memoir analysis, two essay exams, a longer research paper, and
short quizzes.  A tentative reading list
is given below.


  • Robert Citino, The German Way of War: From the Thirty Years’ War to the Third Reich (Lawrence:
    University Press of Kansas, 2005)

  • William March, Company K (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2013)

  • Jakob Walter, Diary of a Napoleonic Foot Soldier (New York: Penguin, 1993)

  • Jeremy Black, War & the World: Military Power and the Fate of Continents (New
    Haven: Yale University Press, 2000)

  • Stephen R. Platt, Autumn in the Heavenly Kingdom: China, the West, and the Epic Story of
    the Taiping Civil War
    (New York: Vintage, 2012)

  • Xiaoming Zhang, Red Wings Over the Yalu: China, the Soviet Union, and the Air War in
    Korea
    (College Station: Texas A & M Press, 2000)

  • John Fialka, Hotel
    Warriors: Covering the Gulf War
    (Washington, D.C.: Johns Hopkins Press,
    1992)

  • Christopher Ronnau, Blood Trails: Combat Diary of a Foot Soldier in Vietnam (Presido,
    2006)

  • Rana Mitter, Forgotten
    Ally: China’s World War II, 1937-1945
    (New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2013)

  • James Gump, The
    Dust Rose Like Smoke: Subjugation of the Zulu and the Sioux
    (Lincoln:
    University of Nebraska Press, 1996)

 

 

 

HIS 370 – H001  Mississippi History

Professor Bo Morgan

Reg. Code 1536

TTH 11:00-12:15

 

Yes, this is indeed a
course on the history of the great state of Mississippi.  Come and gain a
fuller understanding of your state, its triumphs and tragedies, successes and
challenges, from Native American settlements to the present day.

 

 

 

HIS 400 – H001  Senior History Seminar

Professor Max Grivno

Reg. Code 4749

MWF 9:00-9:50

 

A
World History of Slavery

Few institutions
have been, and are, as ubiquitous as human slavery.  Indeed, the institution left an indelible
mark—a scar—on almost every civilization, and many nations continue to wrestle
with its painful legacy or with the actual enslavement of its people.  Throughout history, slaves could be found
almost everywhere.  They toiled on the latifundia of ancient Rome and fought in
her arenas; they were workers and sacrificial victims in Mississippian
chiefdoms like Cahokia; they filled the Janissary corps and harems of the
Ottoman Empire; and they grew tropical staples on New World plantations.  For much of human history, slavery went
unchallenged by leading thinkers. 
Immediately after delivering the Ten Commandments, Moses established the
conditions under which Israelites could be held in servitude (Exodus 21:1-11),
while later laws declared that non-Israelites could be bought, sold, and made
into “slaves for life” (Leviticus 44-46). 
Classical thinkers from Aristotle to Augustine pondered the meaning of
slavery and even chided abusive masters, but never called for the abolition of
slavery.  From the 1400s through the
1800s, writers throughout the Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds concocted racial
arguments to justify the enslavement of sub-Saharan Africans.  The eighteenth and nineteenth centuries
witnessed a sustained attack on slavery, one that caused New World slavery to
collapse amidst democratic revolutions and wars of national unification.  Still, slavery lingered in various corners of
the world from the late-nineteenth through the twenty centuries.  Enslaved people were in the gulags of the
Soviet Union, the forced labor camps of Nazi Germany, and today they toil in
extractive industries, sweatshops, and brothels scattered along the edges of
the fringes of the industrial world.

            This
course offers a broad overview of the institution of slavery and, as the senior
capstone seminar for history majors, offers students the opportunity to write a
major research paper focusing on slavery. 
This course is rigorous.  The
class discussions will function like those of a graduate seminar, in which
students are required to come to class with detailed readings notes and to
engage in serious debates about the issues raised in the readings.  You will also complete several small writing
assignments based on the reading.  These
assignments are designed as diagnostic tools. 
They are designed to test your mastery of basic skills that historians
must possess and to allow to improve your analytical and writing skills over
the course of the semester.  Over the
course of the semester, you will also design, research, and write a significant
piece of historical scholarship

 

Required Readings:

Shaw,
Brent D. Spartacus and the Slave Wars: A Brief History with Documents.
Boston, Mass.:

Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2001.  ISBN: 978-0312183103

 

Glancy,
Jennifer. Slavery in Early Christianity. Minneapolis, Minn.: Fortress
Press, 2006.

ISBN: 0800637895

 

Nikitenko,
Aleksandr [Helen Saltz Jacobson, translator]. Up From Serfdom: My Childhood
and Youth in Russia, 1804-1824
.  New
Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 2002. 
ISBN: 978-0300097160

 

Truth,
Sojourner. Narrative of Sojourner Truth. New York: Dover, 1997.  ISBN: 0-486-29899-X.

 

Browning,
Christopher R. Remembering Survival: Inside a Nazi Slave-Labor Camp.  New York:

W. W. Norton & Co., 2010.  ISBN: 0393070190

 

 

 

HIS 411 –H001  Caribbean History

Professor Matthew Casey

Reg. Code 9099

MWF 11:00-11:50

 

This
course is designed to introduce students to the history of the Caribbean from
the landing of Columbus in the Bahamas to the 2010 earthquake in Haiti.  The region that gave the world Bob Marley and
Captain Blackbeard lies just off the coast of the U.S. South.  But what do you know about it other than what
appears on the tourist brochures? 
Settled by people from Africa, Europe, and other parts of the Americas,
the Caribbean has been marked by racial, linguistic, political, and religious
diversity and has often been at the center of global affairs.  This class will focus on the social,
economic, political, and cultural history of the Caribbean with special
emphases on the way that individual people experience history and the region’s
interactions with other parts of the world. 
Students will read fiction and non-fiction texts written by individuals
from the Caribbean that explore themes of European settlement, African slavery,
the local effects of tourism, and the prospects and pitfalls of foreign
development projects. Students will be evaluated on two essay exams, four
essays of four pages each, and their class participation.

 

Required Texts:

Jonathan
M. Katz, The Big Truck that Went By: How
the World Came to Save Haiti and Left Behind a Disaster
(Palgrave
MacMillan, 2013).

 

Jamaica Kincaid, A Small
Place
(Farrar, Straus and Giroux, [1988] 2000).

 

B.W.
Higman, A Concise History of the
Caribbean
(Cambridge University Press, 2010).

 

Bartolome
de las Casas, An Account, Much
Abbreviated, of the Destruction of the Indies
(Hackett Publishing Company,
2003).

 

Eric
Williams, Capitalism and Slavery (University
of North Carolina Press, 1994).

 

 

 

HIS 415 –
H001  World War I

Professor
Andrew Wiest

Reg. Code
9877

TTH 1:00-2:15

 

This course investigates what is
often referred to as the Great War from a military and a cultural
perspective.  Though often ignored in
favor of World War II, the Great War was indeed one of the pivotal events of the
twentieth century.  The approach of war
was met with great joy and expectation – only to clash with the fundamental
realities of industrialized total war on the brutal battlefields of the Western
Front.  In many ways the modern world was
conceived in the hell of the Somme and Verdun. 
The course will investigate the tactics of the Great War, which gave
rise to the tactics of every war since. 
The course will also investigate the cataclysmic effect of the Great War
on the society and politics of Europe and the world.

 

Students will read four books
including: Fussell, The Great War and
Modern Memory
(the classic account of the interplay between war and
society); Kennedy, Over Here: The First
World War and American Society
, Travers, The Killing Ground (the seminal study of the intellectual
background to the military tactics used in the war); and Hart, The Somme: The Darkest Hour on the Western
Front

 

Students will produce a book review
on each of their readings – which will account for 33% of the overall course
grade.

 

 

 

HIS 465 –
H001  US 1919-1945

Professor
Louis Kyrikoudes

Reg. Code
9872

TTH
1:00-2:15

 

Much of what we
associate with modern America emerged during the period between the end of
World War I and the end of World War II.  The 1920s saw the first
stirrings of a modern consumer economy, the 1930s were shaped by the Great
Depression which threatened the existence of capitalism itself, while spawning
a liberal social welfare state that was instrumental in saving it. World War II
ended the Depression and launched America to international predominance
militarily, diplomatically and economically. We will look at these developments
with the goal of understanding how the foundations of modern America were laid
during this period.

 

Course readings will
include Alan Brinkley, Voices of Protest (Knopf1982); David
M. Kennedy, Freedom from Fear: The American People in Depression and
War, 1929-1945 
(Oxford, 1999); Louis M. Kyriakoudes, Social
Origins of the Urban South 
(North Carolina, 2003); Jeffrey
Moran, The Scopes Trial: A Brief History with Documents (Bedford/St
Martins 2002); Richard D. Polenberg, The Era of Franklin D.
Roosevelt, 1933-1945:A Brief History with Documents 
(Bedford/St.
Martin's, 2000).

 

Evaluation will be based upon one midterm, a final, three papers,
and class presentation.

 

 

 

HIS 469 – H001  The New
South

Professor Pam Tyler

Reg. Code 9876

TTH 2:25-3:40

 

The history of the South since 1865 offers
a look at the American South from the end of the Civil War to today. The South,
a fascinating and complex region, has experienced great and sometimes wrenching
change in the last 150 years, the transformation taking it
from rural, agrarian, segregated and impoverished to the prosperous
Sunbelt success of today. We will track these changes in economics,
politics, race relations, women's rights, regional identity and more. Informed
discussion of assigned readings will form the heart of this class. There will
be a steady reading load, a few short papers, a midterm and a final. Good
reading, writing, and speaking skills are a pre-requisite for this
upper-division history course. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HIS 478 –
H001  Topics Afr-Am His

Professor
Rebecca Tuuri

Reg. Code 9871
– 8W2 Session

MWF
12:00-1:50

 

History of the Civil Rights
Movement 

This course will explore the history of
the African American civil rights movement, especially efforts here in
Mississippi, in the 1950s and 1960s but also examine threads of the movement
that have taken place before and after that main time period. In addition to
introducing students to a timeline of significant events, this course will also
encourage them to engage with questions of memory.  To do this, students will read and respond to
seminal works about the movement but also consider recent scholarship on how
class, gender, sexuality, religion, and region change our understanding.  Finally, we will also examine the movement
through an international lens, to see what international organizations, ideas,
and people affected, and what subsequent global impact the domestic movement
had on the world. 

 

 

 

HIS 481 –
H001  Topics Pre-Mod Eur

Professor Courtney
Luckhardt

Reg. Code
10292

MWF
9:00-9:50

 

        The image of the
Vikings in modern popular culture has been as fierce warriors or as Wagner’s
opera-singing Viking women.  Another
common view of Vikings is that of the blood-thirsty pagan barbarians who
descended upon peaceful monks or settlements. 
This view is based on the sources written by the early medieval victims
of Norse raids.  The later medieval
Scandinavian saga literature painted their warrior ancestors as noble savages,
and historians have examined the Vikings as one of these two extremes.

      However, Viking raids were merely one part of a complex
adaptation by the Norse to the marginal lands of Scandinavia. Raids were
certainly a portion of that adaptation, but so too were explorations, foreign
settlement, trade, and extended subsistence activities at the home in
Scandinavia. The Norse were also savvy merchants, gifted craftsmen, hardworking
farmers, and cunning political players who built kingdoms in Europe,
established relations with the Muslim world, and even made it to the shores of
North America.

      This course will explore the culture, history, arts and
worldviews of the Old Norse, including their mythology, the saga literature,
and their conversion to Christianity. We will also investigate how the Vikings
have been understood and represented through the centuries between their days
and ours, and will ask questions about how our knowledge of the Vikings is
produced.

This is an
upper-division history course designed for advanced students, both majors and
non-majors.  As such, analyzing and writing
about primary sources will form a significant component of student work in this
course.  Indeed, the analysis of primary
sources is at the heart of historical inquiry and the course assignments will
reflect this focus, including two essays, an online wiki project, exams, and
class discussion. 

Readings include:


  1. Peter
    Sawyer, ed., The Oxford Illustrated
    History of the Vikings
    . New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 1997.

  2. John
    Haywood, The Penguin Historical Atlas of
    the Vikings
    . New York: Penguin Books, 1995.

  3. The Viking Age:
    A Reader
    ,
    ed. Angus A. Somerville and R. Andrew McDonald. 
    Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2010.

  4. Snorri
    Sturluson, The Prose Edda. ed. Jesse
    L. Byock.  New York: Penguin Classics,
    2006.

 

 

HIS
482-H001

Professor
Brian LaPierre

Reg. Code
8423

MWF

11:00-11:50

 

In
the early 1900s, the communists were a small minority on the radical fringe of
the trans-Atlantic socialist movement. Half a century later, communism was an
international movement that ruled over more than a third of the world’s population.
In this course, we will examine communism from its origins as a radical
critique of industrial capitalism to its emergence as a global socio-political
system. We will look at a political movement that promised a non-exploitative
path to industrial progress, eliminated illiteracy through mass education,
equalized gender opportunities and income inequalities, achieved enviable
scientific accomplishments and instituted a generous system of state-supported
social welfare. On the other hand, we will also look at a political system that
slaughtered, sequestered and starved to death millions of its citizens in the
service of its utopian ideology, instituted draconian forms of information
control and artistic censorship and sacrificed the living standards of its
citizens to military modernization. In this class, in short, we will look at
all sides of the international communist movement — both good and bad. We will
also look at the communist world from a global perspective from Eastern Europe,
Africa and East Asia to the Americas, paying special attention to the
diversities and differences that marked the communist movement in countries as
diverse as the Soviet Union, China, Cuba, Yugoslavia and Cambodia. Topics to be
explored include: the rise of international communism, collapse and continuity
in the communist world, communism as a non-capitalist model of economic
development, communism and genocide, communism and gender equality, communism
and environmental degradation, and communism and anti-communism in American and
European life. 

Course Texts

Archie
Brown, The Rise and Fall of Communism
(New York: Ecco, 2011), ISBN: 978      0061138829.

Karl
Marx and Frederick Engels, The Communist
Manifesto: A Modern Edition
(New York           Verso,
2012), ISBN: 978-1844678761.

George
Orwell, Animal Farm (New York: Signet
Classics, 1996), ISBN: 9780451526342.

Slavenka
Drakulic, A Guided Tour Through the
Museum of Communism
(New York: Penguin      Books,
2011), ISBN: 978-0143118633.

 

Course Requirements

3
Exams

2
Papers

2
Quizzes

 

 

HIS 511 –
H001  Caribbean History

Professor
Matthew Casey

Reg. Code
9100

MWF
11:00-11:50

 

This
course is designed to introduce students to the history of the Caribbean from
the landing of Columbus in the Bahamas to the 2010 earthquake in Haiti.  The region that gave the world Bob Marley and
Captain Blackbeard lies just off the coast of the U.S. South.  But what do you know about it other than what
appears on the tourist brochures? 
Settled by people from Africa, Europe, and other parts of the Americas,
the Caribbean has been marked by racial, linguistic, political, and religious
diversity and has often been at the center of global affairs.  This class will focus on the social,
economic, political, and cultural history of the Caribbean with special
emphases on the way that individual people experience history and the region’s
interactions with other parts of the world. 
Students will read fiction and non-fiction texts written by individuals
from the Caribbean that explore themes of European settlement, African slavery,
the local effects of tourism, and the prospects and pitfalls of foreign
development projects. Students will be evaluated on two essay exams, four
essays of four pages each, and their class participation.

 

Required Texts:

Jonathan
M. Katz, The Big Truck that Went By: How
the World Came to Save Haiti and Left Behind a Disaster
(Palgrave
MacMillan, 2013).

 

Jamaica Kincaid, A Small
Place
(Farrar, Straus and Giroux, [1988] 2000).

 

B.W.
Higman, A Concise History of the
Caribbean
(Cambridge University Press, 2010).

 

Bartolome
de las Casas, An Account, Much
Abbreviated, of the Destruction of the Indies
(Hackett Publishing Company,
2003).

 

Eric
Williams, Capitalism and Slavery (University
of North Carolina Press, 1994).

 

 

HIS 515 –
H001  World War I

Professor
Andrew Wiest

Reg. Code
9878

TTH
1:00-2:15

 

This course investigates what is often referred to
as the Great War from a military and a cultural perspective.  Though often ignored in favor of World War
II, the Great War was indeed one of the pivotal events of the twentieth
century.  The approach of war was met
with great joy and expectation – only to clash with the fundamental realities
of industrialized total war on the brutal battlefields of the Western
Front.  In many ways the modern world was
conceived in the hell of the Somme and Verdun. 
The course will investigate the tactics of the Great War, which gave
rise to the tactics of every war since. 
The course will also investigate the cataclysmic effect of the Great War
on the society and politics of Europe and the world.

Students will read six books including: Fussell, The Great War and Modern Memory (the
classic account of the interplay between war and society); Kennedy, Over Here: The First World War and American
Society
, Travers, The Killing Ground (the
seminal study of the intellectual background to the military tactics used in
the war); Hart, The Somme: The Darkest
Hour on the Western Front
; Sassoon, Memoirs
of an Infantry Officer
(the classic fictionalized autobiography of the
war); and Sheffield, The Chief: Douglas
Haig and the British Army

Students will produce either a collective
historiographical review of these readings – which will account for 33% of the
overall course grade – or a research paper, which will account for the same
portion of their overall grade.

Students will also participate in short seminars
with the instructor to discuss their readings.

 

 

HIS 565 –
H001  US 1919-1945

Professor
Louis Kyriakoudes

Reg. Code 9873

TTH
1:00-2:15

 

Much of what we
associate with modern America emerged during the period between the end of
World War I and the end of World War II.  The 1920s saw the first
stirrings of a modern consumer economy, the 1930s were shaped by the Great
Depression which threatened the existence of capitalism itself, while spawning
a liberal social welfare state that was instrumental in saving it. World War II
ended the Depression and launched America to international predominance
militarily, diplomatically and economically. We will look at these developments
with the goal of understanding how the foundations of modern America were laid
during this period.

 

Course
readings will include Alan Brinkley, Voices of Protest (Knopf1982); David
M. Kennedy, Freedom from Fear: The American People in Depression and
War, 1929-1945 
(Oxford, 1999); Louis M. Kyriakoudes, Social
Origins of the Urban South 
(North Carolina, 2003); Jeffrey
Moran, The Scopes Trial: A Brief History with Documents (Bedford/St
Martins 2002); Richard D. Polenberg, The Era of Franklin D.
Roosevelt, 1933-1945:A Brief History with Documents 
(Bedford/St.
Martin's, 2000).

 

HIS 582 – H001  Topics Mod Eur His

Professor Brian LaPierre

Reg. Code 8424

MWF 11:00-11:50

 

In
the early 1900s, the communists were a small minority on the radical fringe of
the trans-Atlantic socialist movement. Half a century later, communism was an
international movement that ruled over more than a third of the world’s
population. In this course, we will examine communism from its origins as a
radical critique of industrial capitalism to its emergence as a global
socio-political system. We will look at a political movement that promised a
non-exploitative path to industrial progress, eliminated illiteracy through
mass education, equalized gender opportunities and income inequalities,
achieved enviable scientific accomplishments and instituted a generous system
of state-supported social welfare. On the other hand, we will also look at a
political system that slaughtered, sequestered and starved to death millions of
its citizens in the service of its utopian ideology, instituted draconian forms
of information control and artistic censorship and sacrificed the living
standards of its citizens to military modernization. In this class, in short,
we will look at all sides of the international communist movement — both good
and bad. We will also look at the communist world from a global perspective
from Eastern Europe, Africa and East Asia to the Americas, paying special
attention to the diversities and differences that marked the communist movement
in countries as diverse as the Soviet Union, China, Cuba, Yugoslavia and
Cambodia. Topics to be explored include: the rise of international communism,
collapse and continuity in the communist world, communism as a non-capitalist
model of economic development, communism and genocide, communism and gender
equality, communism and environmental degradation, and communism and
anti-communism in American and European life. 

 

Required Texts

Marci
Shore, Caviar and Ashes: A Warsaw
Generation’s Life and Death in Marxism
(New

Haven,
CT: Yale University Press, 2009), ISBN: 978-0300143287

Gail
Klingman and Katherine Verdery, Peasants
Under Siege: The Collectivization of Romanian

Agriculture (Princeton, NJ:
Princeton University Press, 2011), ISBN: 978-0691149738

Paulina
Bren, The Greengrocer and His TV: The Culture of Communism after the 1968
Prague

Spring (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2010), ISBN:
978-0801476426

Patrick Hyder Patterson, Bought and Sold: Living and Losing the Good Life in Socialist

Yugoslavia (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2011), ISBN:
978-0801450044.

Katherine Lebow, Unfinished
Utopia: Nowa Huta, Stalinism, and Polish Society
(Ithaca, NY:

Cornell University Press, 2013), ISBN:
978-0801451249.

Gary Bruce, The
Firm: The Inside Story of the Stasi
(New York: Oxford University Press,
2012).

Jonathan Bolton, Worlds
of Dissent: Charter 77, The Plastic People of the Universe, and Czech

Culture under Communism (Cambridge,
MA: Harvard University Press, 2012), ISBN:

978-0674064386.

Charles S. Maier, Dissolution: The Crisis of Communism and the End of East Germany

(Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1999),
ISBN: 978-0691007465.

 

Course
Requirements

Eight Papers

Comprehensive Final Exam

 

 

HIS 710 – H001  Phil & Meth of Res

Professor Heather Stur

Reg. Code 1544

Tuesdays 3:50-6:25

 

This is the required research and
methods seminar for graduate students.

 

John Tosh, Historians on History, 2nd Edition,
Pearson/Longman 2008. ISBN: 978-1405801683

 

John Tosh, The Pursuit of History, Routledge 2009. ISBN:
978-0582894129

 

Anna Green, The Houses of History: A Critical Reader in Twentieth
Century History and Theory, New York University Press, 1999. ISBN:
978-0814731277

 

Martha C. Howell, From Reliable Sources: An Introduction to
Historical Methods, Cornell University Press, 2001. ISBN: 978-0801485602

 

Frederick Cooper, Colonialism in Question: Theory, Knowledge,
History, University of California Press, 2005. ISBN: 978-0520244146

 

William H. Sewell, Logics of History: Social Theory and Social
Transformation, University of Chicago Press, 2005, ISBN: 978-0226749181

 

Dipesh Chakrabarty, Provincializing Europe: Postcolonial Thought
and Historical Difference, Princeton University Press 2007, ISBN:
978-0691130019

 

Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin
and Spread of Nationalism, Verso 2006. ISBN: 978-1844670864

 

Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison,
Vintage Books 1995. ISBN: 978-0679752554

 

Edward Said, Orientalism, Vintage 1979. ISBN: 978-0394740676

 

 

HIS 711/712 – Seminar in American
History/Seminar in European History

Professor Susannah Ural

Reg. Code 8421/8422

Mondays 3:50-6:25

 

This course focuses on the craft of historical research and
writing at the graduate level.  Students
read and discuss a variety of books and articles that discuss this craft and
then apply these lessons to their writing. 
The class and the instructor then critique these assignments, in an
in-class workshop atmosphere, and then the students revise and resubmit.  The projects include book reviews and other
small assignments, but the primary focus of the semester is a major research
paper grounded in primary and secondary sources.  This can become a chapter in the student’s
M.A. thesis or Ph.D. dissertation, or it can be designed as an article that the
student submits for publication in an academic journal.  There are weekly reading and writing
assignments, as well as written and oral critiques by the professor and the
entire class.  Weekly attendance is
mandatory, as is active and respectful participation in seminar discussions.

 

 

HIS 725 – H001  American Historiography I

Professor Max Grivno

Reg. Code 1545

Monday Nights 6:30-9:15

 

This course is an introduction to some of the major
historiographical debates from the colonial period through Reconstruction.  The course is also designed to introduce you
to a broad range of methodologies and fields, and to expose you to recent
trends in American historical writing. 
Assignments will consist of a series of short review essays and a longer
historiographical piece on a topic that you will develop in collaboration with
the professor.

Required
Readings:

 

Unit I. Slavery
and Empire

 

Rushforth,
Brett. Bonds of Alliance: Indigenous and Atlantic Slaveries in New France.
Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina, 2014. ISBN: 1469613867

 

Gallay,
Allan. The Indian Slave Trade: The Rise of the English Empire in the
American South
.

New
Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 2003. ISBN: 0300101937

 

Hamalaainen,
Pekka. The Comanche Empire.  New
Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 2008.

ISBN:
978-0-300-15117-6

 

Unit II. The
Legacies of the American Revolution

 

Bouton,
Terry. Taming Democracy: “The People,” The Founders, and the Troubled Ending
of the American Revolution
. New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. ISBN:
978-0-`9-53785606

 

Young,
Alfred F. The Shoemaker and the Tea Party: Memory and the American
Revolution
.  Boston: Beacon, 1999.
ISBN: 978-0-8070-5405-5

 

Egerton,
Douglas R. Gabriel’s Rebellion: The Virginia Slave Conspiracies of 1800 and
1802
. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina, 1993. ISBN: 0807844225

 

Unit III:
Markets

 

Rockman,
Seth. Scraping By: Wage Labor, Slavery, and Survival in Early Baltimore.
Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008. ISBN: 978-0801890079

 

Levy,
Jonathan. Freaks of Fortune: The Emerging World of Capitalism and Risk in America.
Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2013. ISBN: 978-0674047488

 

Johnson,
Walter. Soul By Soul: Life Inside the Antebellum Slave Market.
Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 2001. ISBN: 0674005392

 

Unit IV: War and
Ruin

 

DeLay,
Brian. War of a Thousand Deserts: Indian Raids and the U.S.-Mexican War.
New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 2009. 978-0300158373

 

Meier,
Katherine Shively. Nature’s Civil War: Common Soldiers and the Environment
in 1862 Virginia
. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina, 2013. ISBN:
978-1469610764

 

Nelson,
Megan Kate. Ruin Nation: Destruction and the American Civil War. Athens:
University of Georgia, 2012. ISBN: 0820342513

 

Unit V:
Emancipation

 

Gallagher,
Gary. The Union War. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2012.

ISBN:
0674066081

 

Oakes,
James. Freedom National: The Destruction of Slavery in the United States,
1861-1865
.

New
York: W. W. Norton & Co., 2014. ISBN: 0393347753

 

Manning,
Chandra. What This Cruel War Was Over: Soldiers, Slavery, and the Civil War.  New York: 
Vintage, 2007.  ISBN:
978-0-307-27732-9

 

Unit VI: Echoes
of Violence

 

Kelman,
Ari. A Misplaced Massacre: Struggling over the Memory of Sand Creek.  Cambridge, Mass:  Harvard University Press, 2013.
978-0674045859

 

Gilpin,
R. Blakesless. John Brown Still Lives! America’s Long Reckoning with
Violence, Equality, and Change

Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina, 2011. 978-0807835012

 

Emberton,
Carol. Beyond Redemption: Race, Violence, and the American South after the
Civil War
.  Chicago: University of
Chicago, 2013. 978-0226024271

 

 

 

HIS 736 – H001  Modern War and Society

Professor Allison Abra

Reg. Code 7415

Tuesday Nights 6:30-9:15

 

War and Culture in Twentieth
Century Europe”

This course will focus on an exploration of history
and historiography related to the theme “war and culture in twentieth century
Europe,” in which both “war” and “culture” are defined expansively. “War” might
encompass conventional military conflicts like the world wars, but also the
actual and potential violence associated with social movements, decolonization,
and the Cold War. “Culture” will refer to a range of cultures connected with
the home and battle fronts, empire, mourning, memory, and popular culture, while
also referencing key themes and theoretical frameworks from cultural history.
The geographic focus of the course is Europe, but the continent will be studied
in its global context, with consideration given to Europe’s military,
diplomatic, and cultural ties to the Americas and elsewhere, and to Europe’s
imperial and post-colonial relationships with Africa and Asia. Given this
thematic and geographic breadth, the course content should be of interest to
students studying the full range of national and transnational histories, as
well as cultural history, and the history of war and society.

Students will be evaluated based on their
participation in class discussions, short “think-piece” writing assignments, a
term paper, and an oral presentation.

Preliminary
Reading List


  • Isabel Hull, Absolute
    Destruction: Military Culture and the Practices of War in Imperial Germany
    ,
    (Cornell, 2006). ISBN: 0801472938.

  • Nicoletta Gullace, ‘The Blood of Our Sons:’ Men, Women, and the Renegotiation of British
    Citizenship During the Great War
    , (Palgrave Macmillan, 2004).
    ISBN:1403967105

  • Jay Winter, Sites
    of Memory, Sites of Mourning: The Great War in European Cultural History
    ,
    (Cambridge University Press, 1998). ISBN: 0521639883

  • Ben Urwand, The
    Collaboration: Hollywood’s Pact with Hitler
    , (Belknap Press, 2013). ISBN:
    0674724747

  • Mary Louise Roberts, What Soldiers Do: Sex and the American GI in World War II France,
    (Chicago, 2014). ISBN: 0226923118.

  • Wendy Webster, Englishness and Empire, 1939-1965, (Oxford University Press, 2007).
    ISBN:  0199226644

  • Quinn Slobodian, Foreign Front: Third World Politics in Sixties West Germany, (Duke
    University Press, 2012). ISBN: 0822351846

  

HIS 771 – Seminar in U.S. HIS to 1877

Professor Kyle Zelner

Reg. Code 7752

Wednesday Nights 6:30-9:15 

This course will examine the region known as New England in the Colonial period, from approximately 1600 to right before the American Revolution.  A region often defined by the religion of its European population, we will explore just how fundamental Puritanism was to the region and its identity by examining other aspects of colonial society and culture in relation to religion.  Generally we will read a book and an article a week and hold weekly discussions on the assigned readings.  In addition to writing a number of short book reviews, students will write a research paper on some aspect of the history of the period and region.

Some of the books we will read include:

Saints and Strangers: New England in British North America by Joseph A. Conforti           

The Protestant Interest: New England After Puritanism by Thomas Kidd

A Reforming People: Puritanism and the Transformation of Public Life in New England by David Hall

Heavenly Merchandize: How Religion Shaped Commerce, by Mark Valeri

Town Born: The Political Economy of New England from Its Founding to the Revolution by Barry Levy

First Founders: American Puritans and Puritanism in an Atlantic World by Francis Bremer