Expanded Course Descriptions - Spring 2014

HIS 300 – H001   Research Seminar

Professor Matthew Casey

Reg. Code 1385

MWF 10:00-10:50

 

Course Description:

By now you have read plenty of history books and listened to lectures on various topics.  But where does that information come from?  And what is it like to conduct primary source research and create a work of history?  This class, which is required for History majors, will introduce students to all of the processes that go into historical research and writing.  These include conversations about: how to analyze different types of primary sources, how to choose an interesting topic, how to approach secondary sources, how to bring theory into your analysis, and most importantly---how to put it all together into a single, readable, original work of history.

 

Stephen King, On Writing.  Pocket Paperback, 2002 (or other edition).

ISBN 978-0743455961 

 

Kate L. Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations.  Wayne  G. Booth, Gregory G. Colomb, and Joseph M. Williams, eds.  7th ed. Chicago: University Of Chicago Press,  2007.

ISBN  978-0226823379

 

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HIS 300-H002   Research Seminar

Professor Allison Abra

Reg. Code 1926

TTH 9:30-10:45

 

What is history, why does it matter, and how do historians study and write about it? The goal of this course is to introduce students to the practice and writing of history, both by reading historical scholarship and through the production of their own original research paper. The course will be composed of discussions and assignments designed to help students develop their skills in critical reading, archival research, and the mechanics of historical writing (ranging from how to find sources in the library and on the internet, to when and how to employ citations and footnotes.) Students will also complete a series of assignments based around the stages of historical research: identifying a topic, locating primary and secondary sources, and writing multiple drafts of their findings. By the end of the semester, every student will have produced a substantial and polished piece of original historical writing, and be better prepared to undertake upper-division work as a student of history.

Required Texts

  • John J. Arnold, History: A Very Short Introduction, (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000). ISBN: 978-0192853523.
  • Conal Furay and Michael J. Salevouris, The Methods and Skills of History: A Practical Guide, 3rd. Edition, (Harlan Davidson, 2010). ISBN: 978-0882952727.

Course Requirements

Seminar participation / Exercises from Methods and Skills of History: 15%

Website critique: 10%

Book review: 10%

Peer review report (on a fellow student’s paper draft): 5%

Research paper

  • Research proposal: 3%
  • Annotated bibliography: 7%
  • Oral presentation: 10%
  • Rough drafts:15%
  • Final draft: 25%

 

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HIS 300-H003: Research Seminar

Professor Douglas B. Chambers

Reg. Code 5159

TTH 1:00-2:15

 

This course is a semester-long opportunity for you to learn how to “do” history. In this required core course you will learn the basics of historical research from note-taking to thesis formation to the preparation of a significant paper based on original research. In the process, we will examine the nature of history, why it is important, and how historians practice their craft. We will explore a number of fundamental questions: What is historical significance? How does one identify a research problem? Why read what others have already written about a topic? What constitutes a meaningful historical thesis? What is good historical writing? Why is interpretation the key to writing history? The main objective is to prepare you for more advanced study in upper division history courses by helping you develop the basic skills required for beginning historians. The principal goal is to introduce you to the craft of writing history.

 

 

Required texts will include:

 

Galgano, Michael J., J. Chris Arndt and Raymond M. Hyser. Doing History: Research and Writing in the Digital Age. Boston, MA: Thomson/Wadsworth, 2008.

 

Turabian, Kate L. A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses and Dissertations, 7th edition. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007.

 

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HIS 304-H001 Survey of Islamic History

Professor Douglas B. Chambers

Reg. Code 9285

TTH 9:30-10:45

 

This course is designed for upper-division undergraduates to gain a basic working knowledge of Islamic history from earliest times to the present, and in the process for you to develop further your analytical, reading-comprehension and writing skills. Classes will be mix of lecture and discussion. There will be a range of graded assignments, including a midterm exam and several short papers, and each student’s final grade will represent her/his highest consistent level of performance.

 

Required texts will include:

 

Armstrong, Karen. Islam: A Short History. New York: The Modern Library, 2002.

 

Dawood, N. J., trans.  The Koran, 7th rev. ed.  New York: Penguin, 2000.

 

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HIS 310-H001   Survey of Latin American History

Professor Matthew Casey

Reg. Code 7809

MWF 12:00 – 12:50 PM

 

Course description

This course is designed to introduce students to the social, cultural, and political history of Latin America from pre-Columbian times to the present. The course will focus on three themes of fundamental importance to the region: (1) the challenge of political stability and economic growth, (2) the relationship between Latin America and other countries, and (3) the effects of racial, socioeconomic, and gender inequality in the region.  Each unit will begin with a broad overview of the region during a specific time period before focusing on a single country case study.  Throughout the semester, students will be exposed to music, film excerpts, paintings, poetry and other non-traditional primary sources in order to understand the cultural history of the region.  One of the main goals of this course is to illustrate the ways that individuals and local communities experienced history and the many ways that history may be written.  In addition to a textbook, students will read one first-person account, a classic work of Mexican historical fiction, and a contemporary scholarly study.  Students will be evaluated on three papers (4 to 5 pages each), two essay exams (a mid-term and a final), and their participation in class discussions.

 

 

Required Texts:

John Charles Chasteen, Born in Blood & Fire: A Concise History of Latin America, Third Edition, (W.W. Norton & Company, 2011).

ISBN-13: 978-0393911541

 

Diego de Castro Titu Cusi Yupanqui, History of How the Spaniards Arrived in Peru, Dual Language Edition, translated, with an introduction, by Catherine Julien, (Hackett Publishing Company, 2006).

ISBN-13: 978-0872208285

 

Mariano Azuela, The Underdogs: Pictures and Scenes from the Present Revolution: a Translation of Mariano Azuela’s Los de Abajo, with related texts (Hackett Publishing Company; Tra edition, 2006).

ISBN-13: 978-0872208346

 

Kathleen C. Scwartzman, The Chicken Trail: Following Workers, Migrants, and Corporations Across the Americas (ILR Press [Cornell University], 2013).

ISBN-13: 978-0801478093

 

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HIS 331-H001  Later Medieval Europe

Professor Adam Hoose

Reg. Code 9809

MWF 9:00-9:50

 

While Europe and the Mediterranean region in the period of the Later Middle Ages (1000-1500) might seem strange and different, static and uniform, in reality it was a time of great change and diversity, and many of the institutions of our modern societies developed then.  Many of the laws that govern us owe their origins to this period, as do the universities in which we study.  It was the age of the Crusades, commercial revolutions, Francis of Assisi, the Inquisition, the rise of the university, the Black Death, the Renaissance, Joan of Arc, the fall of Constantinople, and the early voyages to the New World.  Throughout this semester, we will examine the vital themes and debates of later medieval history, reading primary and secondary sources, and asking how the people who lived then were different from us and in what sense were they the same.

 

Course content will be drawn from primary sources, secondary literature, and lectures.  Students will be expected to participant consistently in class discussions, write three papers of 5 to 7 pages in length, and take three exams.

 

Required Texts:

Barbara H. Rosenwein, Reading the Middle Ages & A Short History of the Middle Ages (Toronto: Toronto University Press, 2007).  ISBN: 978-0674024052

 

Maureen Miller, Power and the Holy in the Age of the Investiture Controversy (Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's). ISBN: 978-0312404680

 

Rosemary Horrox, The Black Death (Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press, 1994). 

ISBN: 978-0719034985

 

Hobbins, The Trial of Joan of Arc (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2007).

ISBN: 978-0312404680

 

In addition, there will be primary sources and articles that you will be expected to read on-line.

 

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HIS 334-H001  Twentieth Century Europe

Professor Brian LaPierre

Reg. Code 8591

MWF 9:00-9:50

 

This course will examine the history of Europe from WWI to the present. Instead of focusing solely on Western Europe, this course will look at Europe broadly defined. In other words, this course will not only examine Britain, France, and Germany. It will also integrate the often forgotten histories of hinterland regions, like the Balkans, back into the narrative of contemporary Europe. Similarly, this course will focus on much more than political history. It will also look at the cultural and social complexities of a broadly defined Europe in order to uncover the diversity at the heart of this pivotal continent.

Course Texts

Bonnie G. Smith, Europe in the Contemporary World, 1900 to the Present: A Narrative History

with Documents (New York: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2007), ISBN: 9780312406998.

Heda Margoulis Kovaly, Under a Cruel Star: A Life in Prague, 1941-1968 (New York: Holmes

& Meier Publishers, Inc., 1997), ISBN: 9780841913776.

Timothy Garton Ash, The File: A Personal History (New York: Vintage, 1998), ISBN:

            9780679777854.

Course Requirements

One Quiz

Two Papers

Three Exams

 

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HIS 370-01     MISSISSIPPI HISTORY
Professor Bo Morgan

Reg. Code 1929
MWF 1:00-1:50

 

Yes, this is indeed a course on the history of the great state of Mississippi.  Come and gain a fuller understanding of your state, its triumphs and tragedies, successes and challenges, from Native American settlements to the present day.

 

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HIS 374-H001   African American Su 1890-Present

Professor Rebecca Tuuri

Reg. Code 9984

MWF 12:00-12:50

 

Course Description: African American History II seeks to do the following: 1.) provide an overview of significant events, movements, and people from the beginning  of Reconstruction to the present 2.) examine the history of cultural formation within the African American community. 3.) Examine the struggle towards freedom of African Americans themselves 4.) Consider how larger American society, especially that of white America, has manipulated images and ideas in an oppositional way to African Americans 5.) Consider how “memory,” literacy, and access to archival sources affect African American historiography. 

 

This course will engage the student in multiple ways to consider not only how history has been written in secondary sources, but also how it has been publicly remembered.  Students will visit the McCain Archives on campus and the African American military museum (pending its anticipated reopening in the Spring 2014).

 

Course Goals and Objectives

Students will become more historically literate by demonstrating in written work, oral presentation, and/or classroom discussions the following:

  1. More in depth knowledge of historical facts, themes and ideas related to African American history over a broad period of time.
  2. An ability to evaluate more complex historical evidence.
  3. A deeper, more sophisticated understanding of the concept of context and a comprehension of change over time.
  4. Recognition that there are different perspectives on the black past, whether those be historical, interpretive, or methodological in nature.
  5. Writing skills that are coherent and reflective, analytical and grammatically correct.

 

 

Required Texts:

 

Painter, Nell. Creating Black Americans: African-American History and Its Meanings, 1619 to the Present [Paperback]. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006. ISBN: 978-0195137569

 

Tera Hunter To Joy My Freedom (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard, 1997)

ISBN: 978-0674893085

 

Kelley, Robin. Race Rebels: Culture, Politics, and the Black  Working Class. New York: Free Press, 1996. ISBN: 978-0684826394.

 

Kathleen Schwartzman The Chicken Trail: Following Workers,Migrants, and Corporations across the Americas. (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2013)

ISBN: 978-0801478093

 

Wright, Kai. The African American Experience: Black History and Culture Through Speeches, Letters, Editorials, Poems, Songs, and Stories. New York: Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers, 2009. ISBN: 978-1579127732.

 

 

Grade Distribution:

3 Response Papers – 25%

Midterm – 15%

Term Paper (8-10 pages) – 25%

Final – 20%

Participation—15%

 

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HIS 400-H001   Senior History Seminar

Professor Susannah Ural

Reg. Code 5194

MWF 9:00-9:50

 

As the capstone class for history majors at Southern Miss, History 400, the senior research seminar, challenges students to demonstrate that they have mastered the fundamentals of the historical field at the undergraduate level. This course involves research, writing, and oral presentations that include class discussions of the assigned readings (participation is a requirement of all HIS400 classes), writing a thesis (argument)-driven paper approximately 15 pages in length, and making a 10 minute presentation to the class on that project. This section of HIS400 focuses on "Families in Crisis and Conflict," grounded in a fairly lose definition of those terms "conflict" and "family." It could be a family during the Civil War (Amy Taylor's Divided Families) or a slave family surviving the challenges of slavery (Franklin and Schweninger's In Search of the Promised Land) or the family created by soldiers far from home in Andy Wiest's The Boys of '67.

In the first half of the class, students will read the books listed below as well as assigned articles and book chapters, and our class discussions will be grounded in these. In the second half of the class, we will meet intermittently—with class meetings will be structured as "writing workshops," while on other days students will work on their own or meet individually with me — as the class drafts and revises their papers for final submission and presentation at the end of the semester.

 

Required books:

Ralph S. Crandall, Generations and Change: Genealogical Perspectives in Social History (Macon, GA: Mercer University Press, 1986) 086554168X

John Hope Franklin and Loren Schweninger, In Search of the Promised Land: A Slave Family in the Old South (New York: Oxford University Press, 2006)

 

William Kelleher Storey, Writing History: A Guide for Students, 4th EDITION (New York: Oxford University Press, 2013) MUST BE THIS EDITION. ISBN 0199830045

 

Kate L. Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, 8th Edition (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013)0226816389

Andrew Wiest, The Boys of '67: Charlie Company's War in Vietnam (New York: Osprey Publishing, 2012) ISBN: 9781780962023

 

Bertram Wyatt-Brown, The House of Percy: Honor, Melancholy, and Imagination in a Southern Family (New York: Oxford University Press, 1996)

 

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HIS 400-H002   Senior History Capstone Seminar

Urbanism and Urbanization: The Twentieth Century and the City

Professor Kevin Greene

Reg. Code 20340

MW 3:30-4:45

 

History 400 is the capstone course in your study of history at the University of Southern Mississippi.  By concentrating on a specific topic, urbanism and urbanization in the twentieth century, this course will simulate a graduate seminar in history. Throughout the semester, we will investigate the rise (and fall, in some cases) of urban spaces and communities throughout the twentieth century.  The course will place strong emphases on the processes of historical research, methodology, and historiography, and will culminate with your completion of a 12-15 page, detailed research paper. Near the end of the semester you will present your research to the class in a formal presentation.  In order to pass this course, students must demonstrate mastery in critical reading, advanced research, evidential argumentation, superb writing, and oral presentation proficiency.  These are fundamental tools for the study of history and each graduating history major at USM must demonstrate a level of expertise in these elements. This course is one of three Writing Intensive (WI) courses USM history majors must complete—with at least a C—in order to graduate.  This is a seminar in professional history that you must take seriously.  Your graduation from USM depends on it!

 

 

Required Readings:

 

Chauncey, George. Gay New York. ISBN-13: 978-0465026210

 

Fogelson, Robert. Downtown ISBN-13: 978-0300098273

 

Kruse, Kevin. White Flight. ISBN-13: 978-0691133867

 

Larson, Erik. Devil in the White City. ISBN-13: 978-0375725609

 

Rampolla, Mary Lynn. A Pocket Guide to Writing In History (5th or later Edition)

 

Sugrue, Thomas. Origins of the Urban Crisis. ISBN-13: 978-0691121864

 

 

Grade Breakdown:

 

2 Book Reviews                            15%

Research Prospectus                       10%

1st Oral Presentation                       10%

2nd Oral Presentation                      15%

Discussion/Participation                  20%

Draft of Research paper                  10%

Final Research Paper                      20%

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HIS 416-H001  World War II

Professor Allison Abra

Reg. Code 9810

TTH 1:00-2:15

 

From the late 1930s through the mid-1940s, people of all sexes, ages, backgrounds, and regions of the world, were gripped by the dangers, deprivations, and duties that accompanied a “total war.” Millions took on new roles and responsibilities on the home and battle fronts, and endured the horrors of aerial bombardment, occupation, and genocide. At the same time, the war inspired remarkable acts of compassion and feats of heroism. The effects of this global conflict were profound and enduring, and more than seventy years later it continues to fascinate historians and the general public alike.

 

This course will survey the history of the Second World War, with attention being paid to social, cultural, political, and military contexts and perspectives. We will examine a wide array of primary and secondary material, including scholarly writing, diaries and memoirs, novels, public papers, photographs, music, and film.  An over-arching goal of the course will be to get you to question established truths, deviating from a vision of warfare that highlights winners and losers. Rather, we will consider the impact and trauma of global war in a more holistic sense, considering different nations and social groups, popular culture and everyday life, and victims and perpetrators on all sides of the battlefield.

Students will be evaluated through their completion and discussion of readings; a 6-8 page paper on a wartime memoir; a research project (either paper or group presentation); and a final exam. Graduate students will also be responsible for additional readings and discussion meetings with the instructor.

Required Texts

  • Peter Calvocoressi, Guy Wint, John Pritchard, The Penguin History of the Second World War, (Penguin, 2001). ISBN: 0140285024.
  • Diana Lary, The Chinese People at War: Human Suffering and Social Transformation, 1937-1945, (Cambridge, 2010). ISBN: 0521144108.
  • Omer Bartov, Hitler’s Army: Soldiers, Nazis, and War in the Third Reich, (Oxford, 1992). ISBN: 0195079035.
  • J. Samuel Walker, Prompt and Utter Destruction: Truman and the Use of Atomic Bombs Against Japan, (UNC Press, 2004). ISBN: 080785607X
  • Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz, (Touchstone, 1996). ISBN: 0684826801.

 

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HISTORY 417-H001  THE VIETNAM WAR

Professor Andrew Wiest

Reg. Code 8588

TTH 11:00-12:15

 

This course uses a multi-disciplinary approach to investigate the Vietnam War, arguably the most important event, or series of events, in the history of 20th century America. The United States entered the conflict unified behind the doctrine of the Cold War.  Idealistic American youth answered the call defend their nation against Communist aggression.  But by the end of the war America had suffered its first ever defeat, and its society was in turmoil.  America would never be the same, or as innocent, ever again.  Over 3 million Americans served in Vietnam, and over 58,000 lost their lives there in a unique national tragedy.  In Vietnam itself over 2.4 million people perished in a brutal civil war that impacted society there in a way few outsiders can understand.

 

The course will investigate Vietnamese culture, the antecedents to the war, the Fist Indochina War, the military prosecution of the American war in Vietnam, the political battles on the American homefront and the ramifications of the US defeat in Vietnam.  The course will also focus on less-known topics such as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, the music of the era, theories of counterinsurgency and wartime literature.  The course is enriched by the participation of several Vietnam veterans.  Simply put there is no better way to learn of Vietnam than through the eyes of those who participated in the conflict.  Past class participants have included: Marines, helicopter pilots, nurses, CIA operatives, a contentious objector, medics, a Phoenix Program operative, South and North Vietnamese veterans, a member of the Weather Underground, pilots, POWs, a SOG operative and countless “grunts.”

 

Course readings will include: Wiest – The Boys of ’67:  Charlie Company’s War in Vietnam; Bao Ninh – The Sorrow of War; Stur -- Beyond Combat: Women and Gender in the Vietnam War Era; and McMaster -- Dereliction of Duty: Johnson, McNamara, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Lies That Led to Vietnam

 

Course participants will produce book reviews of each book.  The average of the book reviews will form 33% of the final grade.  Students will also take one midterm and one final – each comprising 33% of the final grade.

 

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HIS 456-H001  Nazi Germany

Professor Jason Dawsey

Reg. Code 20343

TTH 9:30-10:45

 

This course is a critical examination of the history of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi movement from the Nazi Party’s origins in an anti-Marxist political milieu in Munich through its assumption of power in 1933 and its eventual decisions for war and genocide in the years after 1939.  The course focuses primarily on the period between 1933 and 1945 and foregrounds the following issues: 1) how the Nazi dictatorship consolidated and retained its power 2) racial policy and anti-Jewish legislation  3) the Second World War as Hitler’s War  4) the implementation of a continent-wide genocide after 1942.  Our course will utilize an extensive array of primary source materials (texts, visual images, films) as well as recent historiography on the Third Reich.  In addition to two exams, there will be three outside writing assignments (each approximately 4-5 pages in length).

 

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HIS 458-H001   The Soviet Union and Modern Russia

Professor Brian LaPierre

Reg. Code 20345

MWF 11:00-11:50

 

 

For anti-capitalist intellectuals, the Soviet Union was a savior society that promised non-exploitative economic development and classless international cooperation. For its many conservative and liberal opponents, the Soviet Union was a militaristic monster that exemplified godless atheism, aggressive expansionism, social repression, and brutal state terror. In this class, we will look at the Soviet Union from all its angles – both good and bad. We will look at a state that dragged Russia from rural idiocy to industrial modernity, eliminated illiteracy, equalized gender opportunities, achieved enviable scientific accomplishments, and instituted a generous cradle-to-grave system of state-supported social welfare. On the other hand, we will also look at a state that slaughtered and starved to death millions of its citizens and imprisoned millions more in the service of its utopian ideological ideals. Topics to be explored include: the causes and consequences of the 1917 Revolution, Stalinism, the war of annihilation against the Nazis, the Cold War era clash of civilizations, the Gorbachev reforms, and the collapse of communism.

Course Texts

Nicholas Riasanovsky and Mark Steinberg, A History of Russia (New York: Oxford University

Press, 2010), ISBN: 9780195341973

Fyodor Mochulsky, Gulag Boss: A Soviet Memoir (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012),

            ISBN: 9780199934867

Arkady Babchenko, One Soldier’s War (New York: Grove Press, 2009), ISBN: 9780802144034.

Course Requirements

One Quiz

Three Exams

Two Papers

 

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HIS 461-H001  The American Revolution, 1760—1800

Professor Kyle F. Zelner

Reg. Code: 20347

TTh 11:00-12:15

 

 

            The era from 1760 to 1800 is arguably the most important period in the history of the United States.  Thirteen diverse colonies, with few links to each other, came together to protest their place in the growing British Empire, joined to fight a war of liberation, and forged a new country, the likes of which the world had never seen.  The period of George Washington and Benedict Arnold; Thomas Jefferson and Abigail Adams—it is one of the most exciting periods in America’s national story.  While it is a time to celebrate, it is also a period which saw great promise lost.  Women, Africans, and Native Americans were participants in, but not beneficiaries of, the grand experiment in republican government that came out of the war.

This course will examine the political, military, and social aspects of the period.  We will focus on the imperial crisis that leads to war; the politics of protest and nation-building; the military conflict from 1775-1783; Loyalists, African-Americans, and women during the war; the post-war crisis in national and state governments; the writing of and ratification fight over the new Constitution; and the Federalist era.  Ultimately, we will have to attempt to answer the question, “Just how revolutionary was the American Revolution?” 

 

Books for the class include:

 

Major Problems in the Era of the American Revolution, 1760-1791: Documents and Essays by

Richard D. Brown

 

Forced Founders: Indians, Debtors, Slaves, and the Making of the American Revolution in Virginia by Woody Holton

 

A Proper Sense of Honor: Service and Sacrifice in George Washington's Army by Caroline Cox

 

Water from the Rock: Black Resistance in a Revolutionary Age by Sylvia R. Frey

 

The Radicalism of the American Revolution by Gordon S. Wood

 

Assignments: Tentatively, class requirements will include three papers, a midterm and final exam, and active participation in weekly class discussions. 

 

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HIS 468-H001   The Old South

Professor Max Grivno

Reg. Code 20339

MWF 10:00-10:50

 

The Old South was a dynamic, multi-faceted society whose economy and institutions embodied the restless energy of antebellum America.  In the course of two generations, the slavery and plantation agriculture burst from their strongholds in the Chesapeake and the Carolina Lowcountry and spread across the Deep South.  At its height, the plantation regime stretched from the tobacco fields of Maryland and Virginia, south to the rice paddies of Georgia and South Carolina, west across the cotton fields of Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas, and north to the farms and small plantations that produced corn, hemp, and wheat in Missouri and Kentucky.  Far from being an anachronism, the society that masters and slaves built was in the vanguard of economic development—its cotton was the backbone of the nation’s export economy and its plantations and slave markets embodied the most modern elements of American capitalism.  Enslaved Africans and African Americans labored in the fields, but they could also be found working in factories and railroad camps and on the boats that plied southern waters.  Although planters and slaves dominated the South, the region’s economy also depended on the labor of poor, landless whites, yeoman farmers, and a diverse group middle class professionals, all of whom added to the distinctiveness of southern society. 

 

This course examines the rise and fall of the Old South, tracing its evolution from the War of 1812, through its dramatic growth in the 1830s, to its destruction and reconfiguration in the Civil War and Reconstruction.  Students will examine a range of questions, including: How different from each other were the North and South?  Was the Old South a paternalistic, almost feudal society, or was it a capitalist society? What were the major regional variations in the South?  What were the sources of cohesion and conflict among planters, the middle class, yeoman farmers, and poor whites?  How did enslaved blacks form communities and families in the face of constant labor demands and the interstate slave trade?  And how did the Civil War and Reconstruction remake the American South?  In addition to our classroom work, students will have the opportunity to visit battlefields and plantations in Mississippi and Alabama. 

 

Students will explore these questions by reading and discussing primary and secondary sources.  The readings are diverse.  They consist of travel narratives and the correspondence of planters, journal articles and chapters from academic books, and several autobiographies and biographies that form the core of readings.  We will read the biography of Celia, an enslaved woman who murdered her master and the autobiography of Frederick Douglass, a bondsman who escaped to freedom and became a celebrated abolitionist.  Their stories will be juxtaposed with those of southern whites like Jesse James, the son of yeoman farmers in Missouri who became a guerilla during the war and an outlaw during Reconstruction.  We will also read the biography of Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Tennessee slave trader and planter who rose to prominence—and notoriety—as Confederate cavalryman and founder of the Ku Klux Klan.  Based upon these readings, students will make entries in reading journals, contribute to online and classroom discussions, and write a series of formal essays. 

 

Required Readings:

 

Blight, David W. A Slave No More: Two Men Who Escaped to Freedom. New York: Harcourt, 2007.

            ISBN: 978-0-15-101232-9.

Douglass, Frederick. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. New York: Dover, 1995.

            ISBN: 978-0-486-28499-6.

Faust, Drew Gilpin. Mothers of Invention: Women of the Slaveholding South in the Civil War.

            New York: Vintage, 1996.  ISBN: 0-679-78104-8.

Hurst, Jack.  Nathan Bedford Forrest, A Biography.  New York: Vintage, 1993.

            ISBN: 0-679-74830-X

McLaurin, Melton A. Celia, A Slave. New York: Avon, 1991. ISBN: 0-380-80336-4.

Stiles, T. J. Jesse James: Last Rebel of the Civil War. New York: Vintage, 2002.

            ISBN: 0-375-70558-9.

 

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HIS 476-H001   History of American Popular Culture (Intellectual and Cultural History of the USA)

Professor Andrew P. Haley

Reg. Code 20342

MW 3:30-4:45

 

In the early nineteenth century, it was Shakespeare.  In the Gilded Age, it was dime novels.  In the fifties, it was television.  Today, it is YouTube.  Lawrence Levine defined it as the “folkways of industrial society,” but that seems rather pompous.  It is Ronald McDonald and Uncle Tom’s Cabin, it is Saturday Night Live and the minstrel show, and it is Hello Kitty and Wolfman Jack.  Popular culture is the stuff that clutters our closets, hangs on our walls, and gets lost under the couch.  It is the stuff we love and the stuff we love to hate.  And perhaps it is also the material culture defines generations and offers the historian the best glimpse at what mattered to people in the past.

 

History 476 examines the history of American popular culture in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  Students are expected to complete seven short essays tailored to the readings.

 

Popular Culture in American History

                Jim Cullen, ed. Blackwell Publishing, 2013

            978047067365-2

 

The Secret of the Old Clock

                Carolyn Keene, Applewood Books, 1991

Note:  The Applewood Books edition is a reproduction of the original 1930 publication.  Other editions are not acceptable substitutes.

 

Other Readings will be Provided by the Instructor

 

 

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HIS 477-H001   Women in American Society

Professor Pamela Tyler

Reg. Code 9792

TTH 2:25-3:40

 

Four centuries of American women's experiences, focusing on the astonishing changes in women's work, education, legal and political status, and sex roles, with attention to variables such as race, class, region, and sexual orientation. One theme will be the efforts of women to deal with stifling limitations placed on them by law, the church and tradition; another theme will be the resistance to change by those with conflicting visions of women's lives.

Course is lecture/discussion, with videos and guest speakers at intervals. Meaningful participation expected of everyone who enrolls.

Students will write 3 short papers (3-4 typed pages), based on assigned readings during the semester. Short research paper (10-12 pp.) is required; due at end of semester.

There will be assigned readings for every class, which will form the basis of discussion.

Books include a reader (scholarly articles & primary sources), 2 novels, 2 biographies.

Grade will be based on midterm exam (20 %), final exam (40  %); final essay (20%); participation (20%), which is defined as regular attendance, meaningful contribution to discussion & the 3 short papers.

 

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HIS 481-H001  Topics in Pre-Modern European History (Medieval Heresy and Witchcraft)

Professor Adam Hoose

Reg. Code 8301

MWF 1:00-1:50

 

In his course, we will focus on dissenting popular movements and practices, such as the Cathars, the Waldensians, the Free Spirits, and witchcraft, in the Later Medieval Ages between 1000 and 1500.  We will also look at how the clergy responded to the dissenters through persuasion, coercion, repression, and inquisition, and how such responses to heresy changed throughout the High and Late Middle Ages..  Through reading primary and secondary sources, we will examine how medieval Christians defined and/or constructed heresy and orthodoxy, and we will ask why medieval Christians used violence against those who dissented from orthodoxy.  In the process, we will explore what characterized medieval religion, society, and culture.

 

Course content will be drawn from primary sources, secondary literature, and occasional lectures.  Students will be expected to participant in and lead class discussions, give 2-3 oral presentations, write a research paper of 18-20 pages in length, and take midterm and final exams.

 

Required Texts:

Jennifer Deanne, A History of Medieval Heresy and Inquisition (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publisher, 2011).  ISBN: 978-0742555761

 

Edward Peters, Inquisition (Berkeley, University of California Press, 1989).  ISBN: 978-0520066304

 

Edward Peters, Heresy and Authority in Medieval Europe (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1980).  ISBN: 978-0812211030

 

Walter Wakefield and Austin Evans, Heresies of the High Middle Ages (New York: Columbia University Press, 1991).  ISBN: 978-0231096324

 

P.G. Maxwell-Stuart, Witch Beliefs and Witch Trials in the Middle Ages (London and New York: Continuum, 2011).  ISBN: B0053P7GU4

 

Mark Gregory Pegg, A Most Holy War: The Albigensian Crusade and the Battle for Christendom (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009).  ISBN: 978-0195393101

 

In addition, there will be primary sources and articles that you will be expected to read on-line.

 

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HIS 487-H001   Current Issues in Social Studies

Instructor Mary Beth Farrell

Reg. Code 8593

Thursday 3:50-6:25

 

A three-hour class that focuses on trends, resources, methods, and standards in  social studies education on the secondary level.   Local teachers and administrators will serve as guest presenters.  IVN technology will be used to make the course available to students on the Gulf Park campus. This course should be taken before HIS 488: Methods of Teaching Social Studies, since it will aid in their preparation for the teaching practicum in HIS 488.  A gold card, a successful USM background check, and a a TK20 subscription is required for this course; this course is only for History Licensure majors.

 

Assigned readings: An current article related to Social Studies and/or History education will be assigned each week, as well as readings from the textbook below.

 

Also required: The NCSS Thematic Standards for Teachers, the Mississippi Educators' Code of Ethics, and the Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Social Studies 7-12. All are available free on-line. 

 

Textbooks:

Martorella, Peter H., Candy M. Beal, and Cheryl Mason Bolick. Teaching Social Studies in Middle and Secondary Schools, 5th Edition. (Prentice Hall, 2008.)

 

Ogle, Donna, Ron Klemp, and Bill McBride. Literacy in Social Studies: Strategies for Improving Comprehension and Critical Thinking. (Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2007.)

 

Course work: In addition to lecture, discussion, and assigned readings, participants will complete 10 reflective writings on observations of teachers in local schools, Website critiques, weekly reports on current articles on Social Studies and History teaching, and weekly assigned readings from the course textbooks.  In lieu of a final examination, a final project of original lesson plans, assessments, and PowerPoint presentation will be due on the last day of class. A dispositions assessment will evaluate students on important attributes of professional educators, such as positive attitude, courtesy, appropriate use of technology, ethical behavior, and willingness to accept constructive criticism.

 

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HIS 516-H001  World War II

Professor Allison Abra

Reg. Code 9812

TTH 1:00-2:15

 

From the late 1930s through the mid-1940s, people of all sexes, ages, backgrounds, and regions of the world, were gripped by the dangers, deprivations, and duties that accompanied a “total war.” Millions took on new roles and responsibilities on the home and battle fronts, and endured the horrors of aerial bombardment, occupation, and genocide. At the same time, the war inspired remarkable acts of compassion and feats of heroism. The effects of this global conflict were profound and enduring, and more than seventy years later it continues to fascinate historians and the general public alike.

 

This course will survey the history of the Second World War, with attention being paid to social, cultural, political, and military contexts and perspectives. We will examine a wide array of primary and secondary material, including scholarly writing, diaries and memoirs, novels, public papers, photographs, music, and film.  An over-arching goal of the course will be to get you to question established truths, deviating from a vision of warfare that highlights winners and losers. Rather, we will consider the impact and trauma of global war in a more holistic sense, considering different nations and social groups, popular culture and everyday life, and victims and perpetrators on all sides of the battlefield.

Students will be evaluated through their completion and discussion of readings; a 6-8 page paper on a wartime memoir; a research project (either paper or group presentation); and a final exam. Graduate students will also be responsible for additional readings and discussion meetings with the instructor.

Required Texts

  • Peter Calvocoressi, Guy Wint, John Pritchard, The Penguin History of the Second World War, (Penguin, 2001). ISBN: 0140285024.
  • Diana Lary, The Chinese People at War: Human Suffering and Social Transformation, 1937-1945, (Cambridge, 2010). ISBN: 0521144108.
  • Omer Bartov, Hitler’s Army: Soldiers, Nazis, and War in the Third Reich, (Oxford, 1992). ISBN: 0195079035.
  • J. Samuel Walker, Prompt and Utter Destruction: Truman and the Use of Atomic Bombs Against Japan, (UNC Press, 2004). ISBN: 080785607X
  • Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz, (Touchstone, 1996). ISBN: 0684826801.

 

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HIS 517-H001  THE VIETNAM WAR

Professor Andrew Wiest

Reg. Code 8589

TTH 11:00-12:15

 

This course uses a multi-disciplinary approach to investigate the Vietnam War, arguably the most important event, or series of events, in the history of 20th century America. The United States entered the conflict unified behind the doctrine of the Cold War.  Idealistic American youth answered the call defend their nation against Communist aggression.  But by the end of the war America had suffered its first ever defeat, and its society was in turmoil.  America would never be the same, or as innocent, ever again.  Over 3 million Americans served in Vietnam, and over 58,000 lost their lives there in a unique national tragedy.  In Vietnam itself over 2.4 million people perished in a brutal civil war that impacted society there in a way few outsiders can understand.

 

The course will investigate Vietnamese culture, the antecedents to the war, the Fist Indochina War, the military prosecution of the American war in Vietnam, the political battles on the American homefront and the ramifications of the US defeat in Vietnam.  The course will also focus on less-known topics such as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, the music of the era, theories of counterinsurgency and wartime literature.  The course is enriched by the participation of several Vietnam veterans.  Simply put there is no better way to learn of Vietnam than through the eyes of those who participated in the conflict.  Past class participants have included: Marines, helicopter pilots, nurses, CIA operatives, a contentious objector, medics, a Phoenix Program operative, South and North Vietnamese veterans, a member of the Weather Underground, pilots, POWs, a SOG operative and countless “grunts.”

 

Course readings will include: Wiest – The Boys of ’67:  Charlie Company’s War in Vietnam; Bao Ninh – The Sorrow of War; Stur -- Beyond Combat: Women and Gender in the Vietnam War Era; and McMaster -- Dereliction of Duty: Johnson, McNamara, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Lies That Led to Vietnam

 

Course participants will produce book reviews of each book.  The average of the book reviews will form 33% of the final grade.  Students will also take one midterm and one final – each comprising 33% of the final grade.

 

Graduate Students enrolled in HIS 517 will read and report on two additional books Logevall -- Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam, and Nguyen -- Hanoi's War: An International History of the War for Peace in Vietnam

 

Graduate students will also produce a research paper (15-20 pages), based at least in part on primary source material and will take part in additional seminars with the instructor. 

 

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HIS 558-H001  The Soviet Union and Modern Russia

Professor Brian LaPierre

Reg. Code 20346

MWF 11:00-11:50

 

For anti-capitalist intellectuals, the Soviet Union was a savior society that promised non-exploitative economic development and classless international cooperation. For its many conservative and liberal opponents, the Soviet Union was a militaristic monster that exemplified godless atheism, aggressive expansionism, social repression, and brutal state terror. In this class, we will look at the Soviet Union from all its angles – both good and bad. We will look at a state that dragged Russia from rural idiocy to industrial modernity, eliminated illiteracy, equalized gender opportunities, achieved enviable scientific accomplishments, and instituted a generous cradle-to-grave system of state-supported social welfare. On the other hand, we will also look at a state that slaughtered and starved to death millions of its citizens and imprisoned millions more in the service of its utopian ideological ideals. Topics to be explored include: the causes and consequences of the 1917 Revolution, Stalinism, the war of annihilation against the Nazis, the Cold War era clash of civilizations, the Gorbachev reforms, and the collapse of communism.

Course Texts

Louise McReynolds, Murder Most Russian: True Crime and Punishment in Late Imperial Russia

(Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2012).

Rex Wade, The Russian Revolution, 1917 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005).

J. Arch Getty, The Road to Terror: Stalin and the Self-Destruction of the Bolsheviks (New

            Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2010).

J. Arch Getty, Practicing Stalinism: Bolsheviks, Boyars, and the Persistence of Tradition (New

Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2013).

Malte Rolf, Soviet Mass Festivals, 1917-1991 (Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Press,

2013).

Rebecca Manley, To the Tashkent Station: Evacuation and Survival in the Soviet Union at War

(Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2009).

Juliana Furst, Stalin’s Last Generation: Soviet Post-War Youth and the Emergence of Mature

Socialism (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012).

Kristin Roth-Ey, Moscow Prime Time: How the Soviet Union Built the Media Empire that Lost

the Cultural Cold War (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2011).

Course Requirements

Eight Papers

Final Exam

 

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HIS 561-H001  The American Revolution, 1760—1800

Professor Kyle F. Zelner

Reg Code: 20348

TTh 11:00-12:15

 

 

            The era from 1760 to 1800 is arguably the most important period in the history of the United States.  Thirteen diverse colonies, with few links to each other, came together to protest their place in the growing British Empire, joined to fight a war of liberation, and forged a new country, the likes of which the world had never seen.  The period of George Washington and Benedict Arnold; Thomas Jefferson and Abigail Adams—it is one of the most exciting periods in America’s national story.  While it is a time to celebrate, it is also a period which saw great promise lost.  Women, Africans, and Native Americans were participants in, but not beneficiaries of, the grand experiment in republican government that came out of the war.

              This course will examine the political, military, and social aspects of the period.  We will focus on the imperial crisis that leads to war; the politics of protest and nation-building; the military conflict from 1775-1783; Loyalists, African-Americans, and women during the war; the post-war crisis in national and state governments; the writing of and ratification fight over the new Constitution; and the Federalist era.  Ultimately, we will have to attempt to answer the question, “Just how revolutionary was the American Revolution?” 

 

Books for the class include (but are not limited to):

 

Major Problems in the Era of the American Revolution, 1760-1791: Documents and Essays by

Richard D. Brown

 

Forced Founders: Indians, Debtors, Slaves, and the Making of the American Revolution in Virginia by Woody Holton

 

A Proper Sense of Honor: Service and Sacrifice in George Washington's Army by Caroline Cox

 

Water from the Rock: Black Resistance in a Revolutionary Age by Sylvia R. Frey

 

The Radicalism of the American Revolution by Gordon S. Wood

 

A Revolutionary People At War: The Continental Army and American Character, 1775-1783 by

Charles Royster

 

Liberty's Exiles: American Loyalists in the Revolutionary World by Maya Jasanoff

 

Women of the Republic: Intellect and Ideology in Revolutionary America by Linda K. Kerber

 

 

Graduate Assignments: I don’t know yet, but there will be many and they will be difficult.

 

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HIS 577-H001   Women in American Society

Professor Pamela Tyler

Reg. Code 9985

TTH 2:25-3:40

 

Four centuries of American women's experiences, focusing on the astonishing changes in women's work, education, legal and political status, and sex roles, with attention to variables such as race, class, region, and sexual orientation. One theme will be the efforts of women to deal with stifling limitations placed on them by law, the church and tradition; another theme will be the resistance to change by those with conflicting visions of women's lives.

Course is lecture/discussion, with videos and guest speakers at intervals. Meaningful participation expected of everyone who enrolls.

Students will write 3 short papers (3-4 typed pages), based on assigned readings during the semester. Short research paper (10-12 pp.) is required; due at end of semester.

There will be assigned readings for every class, which will form the basis of discussion.

Books include a reader (scholarly articles & primary sources), 2 novels, 2 biographies.

Grade will be based on midterm exam (20 %), final exam (40 %); final essay (20%); participation (20%), which is defined as regular attendance, meaningful contribution to discussion & the 3 short papers.

 

In addition to the fulfilling the course requirements for HIS 477, graduate students will meet with me at the start of the course to determine an additional set of appropriate readings and will thereafter meet with me every three weeks to discuss them.

 

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HIS 722-H001  War & Society Historiography

Professor Kenneth Swope

Reg. Code 9402

Wednesday 6:30-9:15

 

Topic: War & Society in Late Imperial China

 

This seminar will examine recent literature in one of the most dynamic fields of study over the past two decades: the history of war and society in late imperial China, roughly defined as the Ming and Qing dynasties (ca. 1350-1911).  This field has witnessed an explosion of research, much of which engages broader debates in the fields of military history, comparative history, and world history, frontier and ethnic studies, and contributes substantially to our understanding of the processes of imperialism and colonialism.  Students will gain an overview of the major works and debates in the field and how they connect to broader debates and issues in war and society.  They will also gain an appreciation for the sources and methodologies used by scholars working in Chinese and East Asian history.  Topics covered include the Japanese invasion of Korea in the 1590s, the annexation of Tibet by the Qing empire, the Qing expansion into Central Asia and destruction of the Mongols, the Opium War, and the Taiping Rebellion, which was the bloodiest civil war in world history.  Texts used will be part of the revised list for graduate students preparing fields in “War & Society.”  Assignments include two short papers, an academic book review, a longer historiographic essay, and in-class discussion and presentations.

 

Reading List

Geoffrey Parker, The Military Revolution: Military Innovation and the Rise of the West 2nd ed. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996) ISBN-13: 978-0521479585 [Recommended]

Frederic Wakeman, Jr., Strangers at the Gate: Social Disorder in South China, 1839-1861 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997) Reprint edition.  ISBN-13: 978-0520212398

Peter A. Lorge, The Asian Military Revolution: From Gunpowder to the Bomb (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008) ISBN-13: 978-0521609548

Kenneth M. Swope, A Dragon’s Head & A Serpent’s Tail: Ming China and the First Great East Asian War, 1592-1598 (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2009) ISBN-13: 978-0806140568

John W. Dardess, Ming China, 1368-1644: A Concise History of a Resilient Empire (Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 2011) ISBN: 978-1-4422-049-1

David M. Robinson, Martial Spectacles of the Ming Court (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2013) ISBN-13: 978-0674073371

Tonio Andrade, Lost Colony: The Untold Story of China’s First Great Victory Over the West (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2011) ISBN: 978-0-691-14455-9

Peter C. Perdue, China Marches West: The Qing Conquest of Central Eurasia (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2010) ISBN-13: 978-0674057432

Tobie Meyer-Fong, What Remains: Coming to Terms with Civil War in 19th Century China (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2013) ISBN-13: 978-0804754255

Stephen R. Platt, Autumn in the Heavenly Kingdom: China, the West, and the Epic Story of the Taiping Civil War (New York: Vintage, 2012) ISBN-13: 978-0307472212

Yingcong Dai, The Sichuan Frontier and Tibet: Imperial Strategy in the Early Qing (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2009) ISBN-13: 978-0295989525

Hodong Kim, Holy War in China: The Muslim Rebellion and State in Chinese Central Asia, 1864-1877 (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2004) ISBN-13: 978-0804773645

Mark C. Elliott, The Manchu Way: The Eight Banners and Ethnic Identity in Late Imperial China  (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2001) ISBN-13: 978-0804746847

David Kang, East Asia Before the West: Five Centuries of Trade & Tribute (New York: Columbia University Press, 2010) ISBN-13: 978-0231153195

William T. Rowe, China’s Last Empire: The Great Qing (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009) ISBN: 9780674036123 [Recommended text]

 

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HIS 726-H001  U.S. Historiography II

Profesor Andrew P. Haley

Reg. Code 1944

Tuesdays 6:30-9:15

 

U.S. Historiography II is a reading and discussion intensive seminar focusing on major scholarly issues in modern American history.  Topics will include late nineteenth century voting patterns, Populism, labor, monopoly capitalism, big government, gender and sexuality, immigration, consumerism, the New Deal, the Civil Rights Movement, American imperialism, the Cold War, and the New Right.  This is not a survey of American history and students are expected to have a solid understanding of the events that shaped modern American history before entering the class.  Instead, the class examines historical approaches to critical turning points in American history since the Civil War.  Students will be asked to critically read, synthesize and evaluate the works of leading historians and to participate in rigorous debates of these works.

 

Beyond participation, students will be required to submit (approximately) three essays that raise questions about the week's readings, to lead historiography overviews, and to submit a model, teachable US II syllabus.  The following books are required.  These will be supplemented with articles and book chapters that will be made available online.

 

The Monied Metropolis: New York City and the Consolidation of the American Bourgeoisie, 1850-1896

                Sven Beckert, Cambridge, 2003

            9780521524100

 

Rebirth of a Nation: The Making of Modern America, 1877-1920

                Jackson Lears, Harper Perennial, 2003

            9780060747503

 

The Populist Vision

Charles Postel, Oxford University, 2007

978019538410

 

Great Arizona Orphan Abduction

Linda Gordon, Harvard, New Edition, 2001

9780674005358

 

The Day Wall Street Exploded

Beverly Gage, Oxford, Reprint Edition, 2010

9780199759286

 

Land of Desire: Merchants, Power, and the Rise of a New American Culture

William Leach, Vintage, 1994

9780679754114

 

The Failed Century of the Child: Governing America's Young in the Twentieth Century

                Judith Sealander, Cambridge 2003

            9780521535687

            Desk Copy Please

 

Movement without Marches

                Lisa Levenstein, UNC Press, 2010

            9780807871645

 

I’ve Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle

Charles Payne, University of California Press, Second Revised, 2007

9780520251762

 

Hot Stuff: Disco and the Remaking of American Culture

Alice Echols, Norton, 2011

9780393338911

 

The Averaged American: Surveys, Citizens, and the Making of a Mass Public.

Sarah E Igo, Harvard University, 2008

978-0674027428

 

Gay New York: Gender, Urban Culture, and the Making of the Gay Male World, 1890-1940 (1995)

                George Chauncey, Basic Books, 1995

            9780465026210

 

War Time: An Idea, Its History, Its Consequences

Mary Dudziak, Oxford, 2013

9780199315857

 

Suburban Warriors: The Origins of the New American Right

                Lisa McGirr, Princeton University Press, 2002

9780691096117

 

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HIS 732-H001  British History

Professor Allison Abra

Reg. Code 20349

Thursday 6:30-9:15

 

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the history and historiography of modern Britain. However, given Britain’s status as an imperial, military, political, and cultural power for much of the last three hundred years, the story of modern British history is really a global story. The readings in this course should therefore be of strong interest not only to historians of Britain, but to scholars of colonial America, modern Europe, and the United States. The course is also constructed to introduce some of the key themes and approaches from cultural history, with a particular emphasis placed on topics like imperialism, popular culture, gender and sexuality, and war and society.

Students will be evaluated based on their participation in class discussions, short “think-piece” writing assignments, a research paper and an oral presentation.

Required Texts

  • Linda Colley, Britons: Forging the Nation, 1707-1837, Revised Edition, (Yale University Press, 2009). ISBN:  0300152809.
  • Maya Jasanoff, Liberty’s Exiles: American Loyalists in the Revolutionary World, (Vintage, 2012). ISBN: 1400075475.
  • Kate Fullager, The Savage Visit: New World People and Popular Imperial Culture in Britain, 1710-1795. (University of California Press, 2012). ISBN: 9781938169038.
  • John Darwin, The Empire Project: The Rise and Fall of the British World-System, (Cambridge, 2009). ISBN: 0521317894.
  • Sonya Rose and Catherine Hall, At Home with the Empire: Metropolitan Culture and the Imperial World, (Cambridge, 2007). ISBN: 0521670020.
  • John Tosh, A Man’s Place: Masculinity and the Middle-Class Home in Victorian Britain, (Cambridge, 2007). ISBN: 0300123620.
  • Seth Koven, Slumming: Sexual and Social Politics in Victorian London, (Princeton, 2006). ISBN: 0691128006.
  • Bram Stoker, Dracula (Norton Critical Editions), (W.W. Norton & Company, 1996.) ISBN: 0393970124
  • Matthew Roberts, Political Movements in Urban England, 1832-1914, (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008). ISBN: 1403949123.
  • T.M. Devine, To the Ends of the Earth: Scotland’s Global Diaspora, 1750-2010, (Smithsonian Books, 2011). ISBN: 1588343170
  • Nicoletta Gullace, ‘The Blood of Our Sons:’ Men, Women, and the Renegotiation of British Citizenship During the Great War, (Palgrave Macmillan, 2004). ISBN:1403967105
  • Sonya Rose, Which People’s War? National Identity and Citizenship in Wartime Britain, 1939-1945, (Oxford, 2004). ISBN: 0199273170.
  • Judith Walkowitz, Nights Out: Life in Cosmopolitan London, (Yale, 2012). ISBN: 0300151942.

 

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HIS 772-H001  Seminar in U.S. History since 1877

Professor Bo Morgan

Reg. Code 20344

Monday 6:30-9:15

 

“Tell about the South.  What’s it like there?  What do they do there?  Why do they live there?  Why do they live at all?"  If you share, with Quentin Compson’s Canadian roommate, a similarly perverse strain of curiosity, you might enjoy this class.  If you are lazy or faint of heart, you definitely will not.  This seminar will explore major themes in the history of the American South since Reconstruction.  Over the course of the semester, students will read the equivalent of a book each week, though much will be in the form of articles and essays, both monographic and historiographical.  The emphasis will be on close reading and tight writing.  Grades will be based on several formal book reviews and a substantial historiographical essay, along with consistently informed and intelligent class discussion on all the assigned reading.  In addition to the obvious issues of race and class, emphasis will be on political, intellectual, and economic themes, including modernization, migration, southern identity, and historical continuity.  In the South, “the past is never dead; it’s not even past.”

 

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HIS 785-H001  Seminar in Oral History

Professor Louis M. Kyriakoudes

Reg. Code 20350

Monday 2:00-4:45

 

Course overview: Once the sole provenance of historians and anthropologists, oral history interviewing techniques are now employed by scholars from a wide range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. This graduate course serves as an interdisciplinary training in oral history methodology, from theoretical considerations about memory and narrative, to more practical topics such as project design, technical considerations, digital preservation, and dissemination.

Assignments and evaluation: Members of the seminar will conduct their own oral history interview project, produce a Mississippi Moments podcast, and present the results of their work to the class.  Evaluation will be based upon preparation of course readings, contribution to class discussion, and the quality of the final projects.

 

Books:

Donald Ritchie, Doing Oral History: Using Interviews to Uncover the Past and Preserve it for the Future (Oxford, 2003)

 Robert Perks and Alistair Thompson, The Oral History Reader. Second Edition. (Routledge, 2006)

 

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IS 491-H001  Senior Seminar in International Studies

Professor Brian LaPierre

Reg. Code 2015

Tuesday 6:30-9:15

 

Want to understand the world and its problems? Take this class and you’ll save the world and obtain your International Studies BA all in one semester.

Course Readings

To be determined by the class

Course Requirements

Substantial Research Paper

Two Formal Presentations

Weekly Response Papers

Other Minor Assignments