Bibliography for Teachers

teacher standing in rows of library booksArchambault, F. X., Westberg, K. L., Brown, S. W., Hallmark, B. W., Emmons, C. L. & Zhang, W. (1993).  Regular classroom practices with gifted students:  Results of a national survey of classroom teachers.  Storrs:  National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, University of Connecticut.

 

Braggert, E. J. (1994).  Developing programs for gifted students-A total school approach.  Victoria, Australia:  Hawker Brownlow.

 

Buchanan, N., & Woerner, B. (2002). Meeting the needs of gifted learners through innovative high school programs. Roeper Review, 24(4), 213.

 

Callard-Szulgit, R. (2005). Teaching the gifted in an inclusion classroom: Activities that work. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Education.

 

Cassady, J., Neumeister, K., Adams, C., Cross, T., Dixon, F., & Pierce, R. (2004). The differentiated classroom observation scale. Roeper Review, 26(3), 139-146.

 

Clark, C., & Callow, R. (1998).  Educating able children:  Resource issues and processes for teachers.  London:  Fulton.

 

Cutler, C. (1996). Gifted students and the triad/revolving door model in the regular classroom. Contemporary Education, 68(1), 57-60.

 

Davis, G. A., & Rimm, S. B. (2004).   Education of the gifted and talented (5th ed.).  Boston:  Allyn and Bacon.

 

Delisle, J. (2000).  Mom…apple pie…and differentiation.  Gifted Child Today, 23(5), 36-37.

 

 Dix, J., & Schafer, S. (2005). From paradox to performance: Practical strategies for identifying and teaching gifted/ld students. Teaching gifted students with disabilities (pp. 153-159). Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.

 

Eakin, J. (2008). How regular classroom teachers view the teaching of gifted students. Dissertation Abstracts International Section A, 68, 4254.

 

Feldhusen, J., & Feldhusen, H. (2005). The room meeting for g/t students in an inclusion classroom. Teaching strategies in gifted education (pp. 97-103). Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.

Follis, H. D. (1993).  A step-by-step plan for developing learning centers.  In C. J. Maker (Ed.), Critical issues in gifted education:  Programs for the gifted in the regular classrooms (pp. 296-304).  Austin, TX:  PRO-ED.

 

Friedman, R., & Lee, S. (1996). Differentiating instruction for high-achieving/gifted children in regular classrooms: A field test of three gifted-education models. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 19(4), 405-436.

 

Folsom, C. (2006). Making conceptual connections between gifted and general education: Teaching for intellectual and emotional learning (TIEL). Roeper Review, 28(2), 79-87.

 

Gentry, M. L. (1999).  Promoting student achievement and exemplary classroom practices through cluster grouping:  A research-based alternative to heterogeneous elementary classrooms.  Storrs:  National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, University of Connecticut.

 

George, D. (1997).  The challenge of the able child (2nd ed.).  London:  Fulton.

 

Heacox, D. (1991).  Up from underachievement.  Victoria, Australia:  Hawker Brownlow.

 

Heacox, D. (2002). Differentiating instruction "in the regular" classroom: How to reach and teach all learners, grades 3-12.  Minneapolis, MN:  Free Spirit Publishing, Inc.

 

Hughes, L. (1999). Action research and practical inquiry: How can I meet the needs of the high-ability student within my regular education classroom? Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 22(3), 282-297.

 

Johnson, S., Haensly, P., Ryser, G., & Ford, R. (2002). Changing general education classroom practices to adapt for gifted students. Gifted Child Quarterly, 46(1), 45-63.

 

Kennedy, D. (1995). Glimpses of a highly gifted child in a heterogenous classroom. Roeper Review, 17(3), 164.

 

Kennedy, D. (1995). Teaching the gifted in regular classrooms: Plain talk about creating a gifted-friendly classroom. Roeper Review, 17(4), 232-234.

 

Magner, L. (2005). The 2-5-8 plan: Reaching all children through differentiated assessment. Teaching strategies in gifted education (pp. 65-70). Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.

 

McDaniel, T. R. (2002).  Mainstreaming the gifted:  Historical perspectives on excellence and equity.  Roeper Review, 24, 112-115.

 

McGrail, L. (2005). Modifying regular classroom curricula for high-ability students. Teaching strategies in gifted education (pp. 17-24). Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.

 

Ministry of Education. (2000). Gifted and talented students:  Meeting their needs in New Zealand schools.  Wellington, New Zealand:  Learning Media.

 

Mulhern, J. (2003). The gifted child in the regular classroom. Roeper Review, 25(3), 112.

 

Palladino, C. (2009). Teachers' perspectives on educating the gifted learner within the regular education classroom. Dissertation Abstracts International Section A, 69, 3863.

 

Powers, E. (2008). The use of independent study as a viable differentiation technique for gifted learners in the regular classroom. Gifted Child Today, 31(3), 57-65.

 

Rakow, S. (2007). All means all: Classrooms that work for advanced learners. National Middle School Association, Middle Ground 11(1), 10-12.

 

Reed, C. (2004). Mathematically gifted in the heterogeneously grouped mathematics classroom: What is a teacher to do?   Journal of Secondary Gifted Education, 15(3), 89-95.

 

Reis, S. M., Burns, D. E., & Renzulli, J. S. (1992).  Curriculum compacting:  The complete guide to modifying the regular curriculum for high ability students.  Mansfield Center, CT:  Creative Learning Press.

 

Reis, S. M., Westberg, K. L., Kulikowich, J., Caillard, F., Hébert, T., Plucker, J., Purcell, J. H., rogers, J. B., & Smist, J. M. (1993).  Why not let high ability students start school in January?  The curriculum compacting study (Research Monograph 93106).  Storrs:  National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, University of Connecticut.

 

Renzulli, J. S. (1996).  The interest-a-lyzer family of instruments:  A manual for teachers.  Mansfield Center, CT:  Creative Learning Press.

 

Renzulli, J. S. (1998).  A rising tide lifts all ships:  Developing the gifts and talents of all students.  Phi Delta Kappan, 80, 104-111.

 

Renzulli, J. S. (1999).  What is this thing called giftedness, and how do we develop it?  A twenty-five year perspective.  Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 23, 3-54.

 

Renzulli, J. S., Gentry, M., & Reis, S. M. (2003).  Enrichment clusters:  A practical plan for real-world, student-driven learning.  Mansfield Center, CT:  Creative Learning Press.

 

Renzulli, J. S., Leppien, J. H., & Hays, T. S. (2000).  The multiple menu model:  A practical guide for developing differentiated curriculum.  Mansfield Center, CT:  Creative Learning Press.

 

Renzulli, J. S., & Reis, S. M. (1997)  The schoolwide enrichment model:  New directions for developing high-end learning.  In N. Colangelo & G. A. Davis (Eds).  Handbook for gifted education (2nd ed., pp. 136-154).  Needham Heights, MA:  Allyn and Bacon.

 

Renzulli, J. (2008). Teach to the top: How to keep high achievers engaged and motivated. Instructor, 117(5), 34.

 

Rief, S., & Heimburge, J. (2006). How to reach and teach all children in the inclusive classroom: Practical strategies, lessons, and activities (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

 

Riley, T. (2009). Teaching gifted and talented students in regular classrooms. Methods and materials for teaching the gifted (3rd ed.) (pp. 631-672). Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.

 

Rogers, K. B. (2002).  Re-forming gifted education:  How parents and teachers can match the program to the child.  Dayton, OH:  Gifted Potential Press.

 

Scott, L. (2009). Meeting gifted and talented students' needs by enhancing regular education teachers' skills: A mixed study. Dissertation Abstracts International Section A, 69, 3019.

 

Smith, K. (2008). Teaching talented writers in the regular classroom. Gifted Child Today, 31(2), 19-26.

 

Smutney, J. F., Walker, S. Y., & Meckstroth, E. A. (1997).  Teaching young gifted children in the regular classroom.  Minneapolis, MN:  Free Spirit.

 

Teno, K. (2005). Cluster grouping elementary gifted students in the regular classroom: A teacher's perspective. Teaching strategies in gifted education (pp. 83-95). Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.

 

Tomlinson, C. A. (1995).  How to differentiate instruction in mixed-ability classrooms.  Alexandria, VA:  Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

 

Tomlinson, C. A. (1999).  The differentiated classroom:  Responding to the needs of all learners.  Alexandria, VA:  Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

 

Tomlinson, C. A. (2001).   How to differentiate instruction in mixed-ability classrooms (2nd ed.).  Alexandria, VA:  Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

 

Tomlinson, C. A., Kaplan, S. N., Renzulli, J. S., Purcell, J., Leppien, J., & Burns, D. (2002).  The parallel curriculum:  A design to develop potential and challenge high-ability learners.  Thousand Oaks, CA:  Corwin Press.

 

Uresti, R., Goertz, J., & Bernal, E. (2002). Maximizing achievement for potentially gifted and talented and regular students in a primary classroom. Roeper Review, 25(1), 27-31.

 

VanTassel-Baska, J. (1993).  A reaction to local program development as a disjointed exercise.  In C. J. Maker (Ed.).  Critical issues in gifted education:  Programs for the gifted in regular classrooms.  (pp. 63-70).  Austin, TX:  PRO-ED.

 

VanTassel-Baska, J., & Stambaugh, T. (2005). Challenges and possibilities for serving gifted learners in the regular classroom. Theory Into Practice, 44(3), 211-217.

 

Vosslamber, A. (2005). Introduction: Gifted readers: Who are they, and how can they be served in the classroom?  Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.

 

Willard-Holt, C. (1994).  Strategies for individualizing instruction in regular classrooms.  Roeper Review, 17, 43-46.

 

Winebrenner, S. (1992).  Teaching gifted kids in the regular classroom.  Minneapolis, MN:  Free Spirit.

 

Winebrenner, S. (2001). Teaching gifted kids in the regular classroom: Strategies and techniques every teacher can use to meet the academic needs of the gifted and talented. Revised, expanded, updated edition.  Minneapolis, MN:  Free Spirit Publishing Inc.

 

 

Resources

 

National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC)
http://www.nagc.org/

This nonprofit organization has addressed the unique needs of gifted and talented children for almost 50 years. Educators, parents, and community leaders may seek information regarding conferences and conventions, publications, seminars, awards, grants, and competitions through this Web site.
 

Mississippi Association for Gifted Children (MAGC)

The state-level affiliate of the National Association of Gifted Children, MAGC serves as a resource for parents, educators, and other concerned citizens who aim to improve the quality of education for gifted and talented students. A calendar of events, summer programs for the gifted and talented, teacher resources, and scholarship and award information are among a few of the resources available.
 
Hoagies’ Gifted Education Page
http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/
A host of resources is provided for educators, parents, and students. Among these are teaching techniques, curriculum units, research articles, professional books, distance education opportunities for students, and continuing education information.
 
Researchers, teachers, administrators, policymakers, and other practitioners will find this Web site especially helpful, as it is designed to provide short reports, generally 1,000 to 1,500 words, which focus on educational issues. The full-text digests are provided at no charge to the public and updated quarterly.
 
Gifted Development Center
http://www.gifteddevelopment.com/
Under the direction of Linda Silverman, the Web site for the Gifted Development Center in Denver, Colorado, offers information regarding characteristics of profoundly gifted students, gifted visual spatial learners, and assessment services. Researchers may also purchase articles on these topics.
 
For teachers interested in involving their students in more in-depth creative problem-solving activities, Destination Imagination is a viable resource. This Web site provides an overview of the annual team competitions that allow students to use what has been learned in the classroom in new, challenging, and creative ways.
 
Future Problem-Solving Program
http://www.fpspi.org/
The Future Problem-Solving Program is designed for students in grades K through 12 to stimulate critical and creative thinking skills through the use of the creative problem-solving process. The program integrates a multidisciplinary approach as students engage in Community Problem Solving, Scenario Writing, and Action-based Problem Solving.
 
Students in kindergarten through college participate in annual competitions at the national and international levels. The Odyssey of the Mind program focuses on solving problems using such skills as team building, evaluation, decision making, and creative problem-solving.
 
This national invention program teaches students to create new and exciting products by implementing creative problem-solving skills, critical and creative-thinking skills, and research skills. Teachers may view inventions by students in grades K through 8 and download sample lesson plans that may be used in the classroom from the Web site.