[PAGE] [PAGE] [PAGE] To Aubrey. Oh, this is the way to the fairy wood,
Where the wolf ate Little Red Riding Hood:
But this is the riddle that you must tell--
How is it, if it so befell,
That he ate her up in that horrid way,
In these pretty pages she lives to-day?
G.R. [PAGE] [PAGE] [SWITCH] Once upon a time there was a little village-girl, the prettiest ever seen: her mother doted upon her, and so did her grandmother. She, good woman, made for her a little red hood which suited her so well, that everyone called her Little Red Riding Hood.

One day her mother, who had just [PAGE] made some cakes, said to her: "My dear, you shall go and see how your grandmother is, for I have heard she is ailing; take her this cake and this little pot of butter."

[SWITCH] Little Red Riding Hood started off at once for her grandmother's cottage, which was in another village.

While passing through a wood she met a wolf, who would have liked well [PAGE] to have eaten her; but he dared not, because of some wood-cutters who were hard by in the forest. So he asked her where she was going.

The poor child, who did not know it was dangerous to listen to a wolf, answered, "I am going to see my grandmother, to take her a cake and a little pot of butter that my mother sends her." --"Does she live a great way off?" said the wolf.--"Oh yes!" said Little Red Riding Hood, "she lives beyond the mill you see right down there, in the first house in the village."--"Well," said the wolf, "I shall go and see her too. I shall take this road, and do you take that one, and let us see who will get there first!"

. The wolf set off at a gallop along the shortest road; but the little girl took the longest way and amused her-[PAGE]self by gathering nuts, running after butterflies, and plucking daisies and buttercups.

[SWITCH] The wolf soon reached her grandmother's cottage; he knocks at the door, rap, rap. "Who's there?"--"'Tis your grand-daughter Little Red Riding Hood," said the wolf in a shrill voice, [PAGE] "and I have brought you a cake and a little pot of butter that my mother sends you." The good old grandmother, who was ill in bed, called out, "Pull the bobbin and the latch will go up!" The wolf pulled the bobbin, and the door opened. He leaped on the old woman and gobbled her up in a minute; for he had had no dinner for three days past. [PAGE] [PAGE] Then he shut the door and rolled himself up in the grandmother's bed, to wait for little Red Riding Hood.

[SWITCH] In a while she came knocking at the door, rap, rap. "Who's there?" Little Red Riding Hood, who heard the gruff voice of the wolf, was frightened at first, but thinking that her grandmother had a cold, she answered, "'Tis your grand-daughter, little Red Riding Hood, and I have brought you a cake and a little pot of butter that my mother sends you." Then the wolf called to her in as soft a voice as he could, "Pull the bobbin and the latch will go up." Little Red Riding Hood pulled the bobbin and the door opened.

When the wolf saw her come in, he covered himself up with the clothes, and said, "Put the cake and the little pot of butter on the chest, and come and [PAGE] [PAGE] lie down beside me." Little Red Riding Hood took off her cloak and went over to the bed; [SWITCH] she was full of surprise to see how strange her grandmother looked in her night-cap. She said to her then, "Oh, grandmamma, grandmamma, what great arms you have got!"

"All the better to hug you with, my dear!"

"Oh, grandmamma, grandmamma, what great legs you have got!"

"All the better to run with, my dear!"

"Oh, grandmamma, grandmamma, what great eyes you have got!"

"All the better to see with, my dear!"

[PAGE] "Oh, grandmamma, grandmamma, what great teeth you have got!"

"All the better to gobble you up!"

So saying, the wicked wolf leaped on Little Red Riding Hood and gobbled her up.

Here endeth the tale of Little Red Riding Hood [PAGE]