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Released April 19, 2005

SOUTHERN MISS RECEPTIONIST RELEASES NEW MURDER MYSTERY

Long Beach - Captivated by television mysteries Matlock and Murder She Wrote, Terry Miles-a University of Southern Mississippi Gulf Coast College of Education and Psychology receptionist-knew it was only a matter of time before she would succumb to the urges to create a couple of suspenseful thrillers of her own.

The 68-year-old mystery novelist is currently celebrating the release of her newest book "Death Has No Appeal"-a 230-page novel that's sure to give die-hard investigators a run for their money as they work to untangle the plot's many twists and turns.

"It is full of humor, suspense, murder and catching the bad guy," said Miles, who will hold a book signing April 23 from 1-3 p.m. at Barnes and Noble Booksellers at Gulfport's Crossroads Mall.

Miles' Death Has No Appeal, featuring characters from her first book I'll Love You Till You Die, is somewhat reminiscent of the television phenomenon Desperate Housewives-a small community masked with tranquility but drenched in deception and naughtiness.

"People bring fruit to prisoners, there are crooked lawyers and some mischievous people, you know everyday life," said Miles, a 1999 Southern Miss graduate and mother of three.

Miles' love affair with mysteries began at an early age. While many of her peers played Jacks or jump rope to unwind, Miles delighted in books. By the time she advanced to grade school, she was already writing short stories and poems and unraveling mysteries written by authors Catherine Coulter, Mary Higgins Clark and James Patterson.

But it was not until last September that Miles decided to see if she had what it took to follow in her favorite authors' footsteps. A conversation with her best friend would spark her first release.

"My inspiration came from a visit with my good friend Evelyn," said Miles. "She bought a used car and found a note in the glove compartment. I asked her, "How about a body in the trunk?" From there, I'll Love You Till You Die was born.

Miles said this book, too, is filled with suspense, suspects and clues that keep audiences turning the pages.

"It begins when Private Investigator Beatrice (Bea) Winslow's Aunt Julia (Aunt Jewels) purchases a used car; little does she realize she's acquired more than meets the eye," said Miles. "A receipt, a body and a cruise to the Caribbean unravel murder, greed and jealousy."

Southern Miss student Venessa Diaz found the book to be entertaining and enjoyable. "I am so stressed as a student that I have no time to relax; this book was certainly a wonderful break," said Diaz. "The characters were very likable, especially Aunt Jewels. This book is like a hysterical episode of Murder She Wrote. I can't wait to read Miles' second book."

Miles said she is thankful for so many of the good reactions she has received from readers thus far. "I have gotten lots of support from both family and friends here at Southern Miss, the Gulf Coast Writers Association and (members of) the Gulfport Little Theatre," said Miles, who is self-published by iUniverse Incorporation, based in Nebraska, New York and Shanghai.

"I just want readers to enjoy the reading," said Miles, who is completing work on a third book, "you know, grab a cup of tea, coffee or hot cocoa and relax."

Copies of Miles' books can be found at Pass Christian Books in Pass Christian, Barnes and Noble.com and Amazon.com. For more information on future book signings, please contact Terry Miles at (228) 865-4512 or at Theresa.Miles@usm.edu.

 

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April 21, 2005 12:26 PM