December 22, 2014  

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Southern Miss to Host Golden Eagle Intertribal Society Powwow

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The University of Southern Mississippi will host the 11th annual Golden Eagle Intertribal Society Powwow on April 19 – 20 at Centennial Lawn on the Hattiesburg campus.

The University of Southern Mississippi will host the 11th annual Golden Eagle Intertribal Society Powwow on April 19 – 20 at Centennial Lawn on the Hattiesburg campus.  A “powwow” is a traditional dance competition, and many types of dancing will be demonstrated. All Powwow events are free and open to the public.

A number of events are scheduled beginning Friday, April 19. From 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., local schools are invited to bring students to experience social dancing, stickball demonstrations, Choctaw storytelling, cornhusk doll-making, blowguns, and southeastern American Indian artifacts. 

Dr. Ian Thompson, an archaeologist from Oklahoma, will discuss Choctaw pottery and traditions from 2 – 4 p.m. on Friday in the Liberal Arts Building and will also demonstrate how to recreate Choctaw pottery. Those who attend may make pottery on Friday and fire it on Saturday. 

From 4 - 6 p.m. the lecture “Why We Preserve Our Languages” will be presented by Marcus Briggs-Cloud in the Liberal Arts Building. Friday’s gourd dancing will begin at 4 p.m., and a cast of American Indians will make their grand entry at 6 p.m.

More activities continue on Saturday, April 20 including a demonstration by world champion stickball players at 10 a.m.  Pottery made on Friday will be fired at 1 p.m.  Gourd dancing will be viewed at 3 p.m., and at 4:30 p.m. the cast of American Indians will make their grand entry.

Tammy Greer, director of American Indian Research and Studies and coordinator of the event, says the community will enjoy traditional American Indian music and dancing. 

“We want to expose the Hattiesburg community to this group that has a great deal to do with Mississippi heritage,” said Greer. “We also want to provide a means for American Indians to interact with Hattiesburg.”

Vendors will sell American Indian crafts, and the community may participate in learning to make crafts. Traditional American Indian food will be served.

“The Powwow is also an incredible opportunity for USM students. We have a couple hundred student volunteers helping with the event, which allows them to be a part of something they never would have experienced otherwise,” said Greer.

The Powwow is sponsored by the Mississippi Humanities Council, Mississippi Arts Council, Center for American Indian Research and Studies, Honors College, College of Arts and Letters, College of Education and Psychology and the Office of the President.

For more information, contact Tammy Greer at tammy.greer@usm.edu.