PBIS SEEDS 2017 (Accessible)

PBIS SEEDS

POSITIVE BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTIONS AND SUPPORTS:

SEEING EXCELLENCE EMERGE IN OUR DISTRICTS AND SCHOOLS

 

REACH MS
Realizing Excellence for ALL Children in Mississippi
MISSISSIPPI’S STATE PERSONNEL
DEVELOPMENT GRANT
THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI
volume 7, spring 2017
REACH MS: MISSISSIPPI’S STATE PERSONNEL DEVELOPMENT GRANT
DEPARTMENT OF CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION AND SPECIAL EDUCATION
THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI

REACH MS STAFF

Hollie Gabler Filce, Ph.D.
Director
REACH MS

Selina Merrell, M.S., Ed.
PBIS Coordinator
REACH MS

Sydney Wise, M.A.
PBIS Technical Assistance Specialist
REACH MS
118 College Drive #5057
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001
Phone: 601.266.4693
Fax: 601.266.4691
Website: www.usm.edu/reachms
Email: REACHMS@usm.edu

Patty Carter Gautier
Family, Data and 
Dissemination Coordinator
REACH MS

Brittany Herrington, Ph.D.
Early Learning and Significant
Cognitive Disabilities Specialist
REACH MS

Deanne Cunningham
Administrative Assistant

Rich Baker, M.S.
Webmaster

PBIS SEEDS REVIEW PANEL

Hollie Gabler Filce, Ph.D., Director, REACH MS
Selina Merrell, M.S., Ed., PBIS Coordinator, REACH MS
Patty Carter Gautier, Family, Data and Dissemination Coordinator, REACH MS
Sydney Wise, M.A., PBIS Technical Assistance Specialist, REACH MS

 

This document was produced under U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs Grant No. H323A100001. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the positions or policies of the Department of Education. No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service or enterprise mentioned in this publication is intended or should be inferred. This product is public domain. Authorization to reproduce it in whole or in part is granted. While permission to reprint this publication is not necessary, the citation should be: H. Filce, P. Gautier, S. Merrell & S. Wise (Eds.). (2017, Spring). PBIS: Seeing Excellence Emerge in our Districts and Schools (Volume 7). Hattiesburg, MS: The University of Southern Mississippi, Realizing Excellence for ALL Children in Mississippi (REACH MS) - Mississippi’s State Personnel Development Grant.

 

REACH MS
Realizing Excellence for ALL Children in Mississippi
PBIS SEEDS
positive behavioral
interventions and supports:
seeing excellence emerge
in our districts and schools
volume 7, spring 2017

Table of Contents

REACH MS STAFF
PBIS SEEDS REVIEW PANEL
ABOUT PBIS SEEDS
ABOUT REACH MS
ABOUT PBIS
WHAT ARE THE CRITICAL ELEMENTS?
-Data Entry and Analysis
-Identifying School-wide Expectations and Rules
-Developing a System for Teaching Appropriate Behavior
-Developing a School-wide Reinforcement System
-Office Discipline Referral Process
-Establishing a SWPBIS Team and Buy-in
-Building Faculty, Staff and Family/Community Involvement
DATA ENTRY AND ANALYSIS
-HOUSTON LOWER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
-MERIDIAN FRESHMAN GRADE ACADEMY
-NORTH PONTOTOC UPPER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
IDENTIFYING SCHOOL-WIDE EXPECTATIONS AND RULES
-ABERDEEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
-MADISON AVENUE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (K-2)
-MARION PARK ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL
-WINONA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
DEVELOPING A SYSTEM FOR TEACHING APPROPRIATE BEHAVIOR
-NEWTON COUNTY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
-NORTH PONTOTOC UPPER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
-SPANN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
-STONEBRIDGE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
DEVELOPING A SCHOOL-WIDE REINFORCEMENT SYSTEM
-ABERDEEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
-LEAKE CENTRAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
-MARY BETHUNE ALTERNATIVE CENTER
-NEWTON COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL
-NORTH PONTOTOC UPPER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
-PELAHATCHIE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
-POPLAR SPRINGS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
-PURVIS MIDDLE SCHOOL
-SOUTH PONTOTOC ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
-WINONA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
OFFICE DISCIPLINE REFERRAL PROCESS
-MARION PARK ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL
ESTABLISHING A SWPBIS TEAM AND BUY-IN
-MARION PARK ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL
-RANKIN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT PBIS TEAM
-WINONA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
BUILDING FACULTY, STAFF AND FAMILY/COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT
-BANKSTON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
-EARL TRAVILLION ATTENDANCE CENTER
-HOUSTON LOWER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
-NEWTON COUNTY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
-NEWTON COUNTY MIDDLE SCHOOL
-NORTHWEST RANKIN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
-SUDDUTH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES
-School-Wide Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (Tier 1)
-Team Leader SWPBIS (Tier1)
-Tier 2 Interventions and System for Behavioral Support
-Tier 3 Systems and Interventions for Behavioral Support
PBIS SEEDS CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
APPLICATION FOR NEXT VOLUME OF PBIS SEEDS
RUBRIC FOR SUBMISSIONS TO PBIS SEEDS
REACH MS PBIS MODEL SITES
-ALCORN COUNTY
-CHICKASAW COUNTY
-FORREST COUNTY
-HARRISON COUNTY
-HINDS COUNTY
-LAMAR COUNTY
-LAUDERDALE COUNTY
-LEAKE COUNTY
-LEE COUNTY
-LEFLORE COUNTY
-MADISON COUNTY
-NEWTON COUNTY
-OKTIBBEHA COUNTY
-HARRISON COUNTY
-PEARL RIVER COUNTY
-PONTOTOC COUNTY
-RANKIN COUNTY
-WARREN COUNTY
-YAZOO COUNTY
REACH MS SOCIAL MEDIA BLITZ!

ABOUT PBIS SEEDS

  
Welcome to our seventh volume of PBIS: Seeing Excellence Emerge in our Districts and Schools (PBIS SEEDS). As always, we are pleased to have the opportunity to shine the spotlight on the schools and districts that are doing great things with and on behalf of our students in Mississippi.  This idea filled volume is our largest to date. Each year brings more and more submissions and harder decisions. There are so many great things going on out there. It’s hard not to select every one. In addition to its size, this issue feels extra special, as we look at the inspiring submissions and recognize that we have representation that ranges from brand new schools, who have really just begun sowing the seeds of their PBIS journey, to schools that have been with us since REACH MS’s humble beginnings 10 years ago. Amazing! We couldn’t be more pleased with the progress of which we have been so fortunate to be a part. We also relish the excitement that comes with anticipating what is yet to come. PBIS past, present and future...we enjoy it all! We hope you find the information included useful in your PBIS process, whether it’s a new journey or one you’ve been on for a while. Sharing innovative ideas and tools was, and still is, the entire purpose behind it. We love the feedback we get letting us know it has done and continues to do just what we intended. Don’t forget, we have other awesome resources, as well. We have a website full of useful information, REACH MS PBIS Model Sites across our state waiting to be visited, and professional development opportunities taking place year-round. We encourage you to take advantage of these valuable resources as you continue growing your PBIS garden.

Sincerely,
Hollie Gabler Filce, Ph.D.
Director, REACH MS

ABOUT REACH MS  

  
Realizing Excellence for ALL Children in Mississippi (REACH MS) is Mississippi’s State Personnel Development Grant, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs. REACH MS focuses primarily on supporting school-wide and district-wide implementation of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) at the elementary, middle and high school levels. Awarded to the Mississippi Department of Education in 2005, the grant is operated by The University of Southern Mississippi’s Department of Curriculum, Instruction and Special Education. The goals of the grant are as follows:   • Provide high-quality professional development opportunities meeting the needs of educators, related service providers, families and children of our state.   • Increase the engagement of stakeholders within and beyond the Mississippi Department of Education to support a more unified, sustainable structure of professional development processes, products and opportunities for both pre-service and in-service educators.  • Engage and support local education agencies, institutes of higher learning, families and other stakeholders to increase Mississippi’s capacity to meet state goals relevant to PBIS through program improvement.   

ABOUT PBIS  

Improving student academic and behavioral outcomes is about ensuring all students have access to the most effective instructional and behavioral practices and interventions possible. PBIS provides an operational framework for achieving these outcomes. This approach can be school-wide, classroom, in a specific setting or with an individual student. More importantly, PBIS is not a curriculum, intervention or practice, but is a decision-making framework that guides selection, integration and implementation of the best evidence-based academic and behavioral practices for improving important academic and behavior outcomes for all students.  As schools move through this decision-making framework, they create, adjust or integrate behavioral systems designed to support faculty/staff, students and families.  

WHAT ARE THE CRITICAL ELEMENTS?  

Critical elements provide the structure by which schools and districts can think about their local needs and plan comprehensively to address those needs. These critical elements address processes, routines, working structures and administrative supports necessary to implementation of positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS). When implemented with fidelity, these elements promote a data-driven, research-validated approach that ensures valued outcomes are attained, making the school environment productive and educative. Each of the following critical elements must be in place for a school to be fully implementing PBIS:   

Data Entry and Analysis

• Link PBIS to Mississippi’s Response to Intervention recommendations.
• Prioritize areas of need on action plan, continuously problem-solve and 
evaluate progress.
• Inform stakeholders and motivate staff.

Identifying School-wide Expectations and Rules

• Generate expectations in alignment with Mississippi’s Response to
Intervention recommendations.
• Create a school motto.
• Identify your top three to five school–wide expectations.
• Define expectations in easily understood language.
• Differentiate between rules and expectations.
• State why rules and routines are important.
• Define and develop rules for specific settings in your school. 

Developing a System for Teaching Appropriate Behavior

• Identify why and how to teach rules and expectations.
• Develop creative activities for teaching school-wide expectations and rules.
• Identify how to embed expectations in the curriculum. 

Developing a School-wide Reinforcement System

• Increase the likelihood that desired behaviors will be repeated.
• Focus staff and student attention on desired behaviors.
• Foster a positive school climate.
• Increase instructional time.

Office Discipline Referral Process

• Discuss effectiveness and meaningfulness of current discipline referral process.
• Clarify classroom- versus office-managed behaviors (minor and major).
• Develop a discipline ladder.
•  Develop form for minor incidents and make modifications to major incident 
referral form (ODR).

Establishing a SWPBIS Team and Buy-in

• Identify the characteristics of an effective team.
• Identify critical team roles and responsibilities.
• Identify components of an effective team meeting.
• Provide monthly reports of discipline data.
• Gain participation of family representatives.
•  Document PBIS as one of the top-three school improvement goals of the 
School Improvement Plan. 

Building Faculty, Staff and Family/Community Involvement

•  Identify strategies to enhance communication, motivation and meaningful
involvement of faculty and family members.

DATA ENTRY AND ANALYSIS

HOUSTON LOWER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

 

PRODUCT: HOUSTON LOWER ELEMENTARY TRICKLE DOWN DATA
WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
We needed a way to ensure we were reviewing our school-wide data with consistency, as well as finding a way to help our entire school staff understand and see its value. We know that examining and utilizing the data related to ODRs and school-wide behavior and attendance is imperative, but with so many demands placed on school employees’ time, coordinating an ideal time for a large group of individuals to meet can be extremely difficult.
Knowing all this, we wanted the data to work for us, and we wanted a way for our entire school staff to see the benefits of using the data to prompt positive change, not just the PBIS team.  We did not want to take any more time away from our teachers’ planning periods or add an additional after-school meeting.
DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
We have incorporated our PBIS team directly into our Behavior RTI team. Our team meets monthly on dates that have been predetermined at the beginning of the school year. During our meetings, we thoroughly review all school-wide data, as well as discuss students populating for Behavior and Attendance RTI. It is a seamless partnership.
The team includes representation from all grades and departments of our school, including SPED and administration. Most of our team members are also PBIS team members. Each grade level team representative takes the data packet given to them during our monthly meetings back to their grade level partners. During bi-weekly grade level meetings, our teachers are able to see school-wide data in person and discuss findings in a trickle down manner.
IMPACT
After conducting our first meeting and then letting the information trickle down to each grade level, our ODRs decreased the next month by 39%. The decrease in ODRs from the same time period one-year prior was 53%. Currently we remain below the national average for referrals per day per month. Using this method of trickle down data, our teachers get the information without having to schedule or plan for another meeting. Based on data, our teachers are re-teaching expectations and adjusting incentives as needed for their grades.

MERIDIAN FRESHMAN GRADE ACADEMY

PRODUCT: USING DATA EFFECTIVELY AT MERIDIAN FRESHMAN ACADEMY
WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
Collecting and analyzing data assists the PBIS Team and Leadership Team in developing a plan of action to decrease the number of ODRs, which will ultimately guide individual classroom practices that help reduce problem behaviors and also build relationships with the students.
DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
Monthly data is collected by the PBIS coordinator; this data is analyzed by the PBIS team and then presented to the faculty and staff. The Principal Academy conducts monthly data analysis meetings with the faculty and staff. This provides information related to the total monthly Office Discipline Referrals, location of ODRs, gender, and total number of exclusionary discipline administers, etc. Our data is also shared with the district PBIS director in our central office, where it is again analyzed at a district-wide level, which, in turn, assists in the development of the district’s overall discipline/behavior plans and goals.
IMPACT
The following graphs offer a snapshot/format of the monthly data that is being collected and also what areas are being analyzed. Closely monitoring all data affords us the opportunity to make changes to the interventions being used if they aren’t found to be successful.

NORTH PONTOTOC UPPER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

PRODUCT: GOOGLE DRIVE COMMENT PAGE
WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
Our PBIS team wanted to create an efficient way to disseminate behavioral data to our faculty each month prior to our school-wide monthly PBIS meeting. We felt faculty members would be more engaged with data analysis if they were given the data a few days in advance and then asked to comment on a faculty-wide shared Google document with any trends or anomalies they saw in the data.

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT We use Google Drive school-wide for many different things. For our PBIS data, we created a shared folder within Google Drive for us to use for data uploads, SWIS graphs and reports, and comment pages from faculty members based on observations made while viewing the data. The folder is only accessible by the faculty members in our building. As the teachers comment on the data, different questions arise and different observations are made.

IMPACT
Having each teacher analyze the data before our group meeting helps everyone come to the meeting familiar with that month’s data and ready to discuss any questions that arose during the data analysis. It also helps the administrator or PBIS team leader do any needed research into referrals made to answer specific
questions mentioned in the shared Google document. Our monthly meetings are now more useful for behavioral decisions at our school.

IDENTIFYING SCHOOL-WIDE EXPECTATIONS AND RULES

ABERDEEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

PRODUCT: ABERDEEN ELEMENTENTARY SCHOOL BULLDOGS B.A.R.K. EXPECTATIONS

WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
Aberdeen Elementary School is home to approximately 450 students in grades pre-kindergarten through third grade. During the 2015-16 school year, students on average received one office discipline referral and three bus referrals. These referrals were taking away much-needed instructional time to handle the discipline issues and process them. The PBIS model was implemented to reinforce appropriate behavior and minimize lost instructional time due to behavior and discipline.  

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT At Aberdeen Elementary School, students are reminded of the Bulldogs B.A.R.K. each morning over the intercom. Bulldogs B.A.R.K. stands for Be Responsible, Always Respectful, Ready for My Next Level, and Kind to Others. After the principal or assistant principal states the expectations, students bark three times. Students are asked to repeat the B.A.R.K. expectations throughout the day and are rewarded with Bulldog Bucks when they are seen modeling these expectations. The expectations are displayed school-wide.  

IMPACT PBIS has had a tremendous impact at Aberdeen Elementary since its implementation. Parental involvement has increased by over 100%, teachers and students now have consistent school-wide expectations to follow, and the students love the Bulldog Bucks as our token economy reinforcer for appropriate behavior.

MADISON AVENUE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (K-2)

PRODUCT: SUPER JAGS AT MADISON AVENUE
WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
The staff of Madison Avenue Elementary School recognized that consistent reminders throughout the school building are helpful for our young students (ages five to eight) to remember how to control their behavior in various settings.

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
Specific rules are stated for each for the six different areas of the school – cafeteria, playground, hallways, bathrooms, classrooms and dismissal locations. These rules are divided into three categories, which are the school expectations – Be Safe, Be Responsible, and Be Respectful. Posters are visible in all six areas and are utilized as reminders for students to present “Super Jag” expectations.

IMPACT
Our staff now has a common language to teach and review school expectations and rules. Therefore, our students are now able to easily understand and follow the given directions regardless of the difference in teacher or setting. Also, we have noted that with the consistent expectations in every area, students make the connection between the specific rules in each area and the overall school motto.

MARION PARK ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL

 

PRODUCT: USING PBIS IN THE MARION PARK INTAKE PROCESS WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
The mission of Marion Park is to promote academic success, modify behavior, and to support career and character education development, while fostering self-esteem and building relationships in an environment that differs from the traditional setting. The implementation of PBIS reinforced that consistent, school-wide expectations and rules help staff, students and family members have a common language and clear understanding of what is expected of our students.

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT School-wide rules and expectations are posted throughout the building and classrooms. Parents and students also go over the school-wide expectations and PBIS matrix during intake with the administrator. Parents are given a Marion Park PBIS brochure, along with other helpful information for parents and students. Teachers use the posters and a PowerPoint presentation to teach PBIS expectations to the students. This presentation is used frequently throughout the year to reteach expectations. Students who are having greater difficulties with the rules are allowed to watch the presentation individually, if they need to do so. Students are redirected, and rules are retaught daily. Parents and students meet with an administrator prior to entering Marion Park. The intake consists of an explanation of Marion Park’s procedures and guidelines. This includes our PBIS expectations and matrix. Parents receive a package of materials, which includes the MPSD Code of Conduct and the district’s and Marion Park’s PBIS information. A receipt of this information is signed at the conclusion of the intake meeting.  

IMPACT Using PBIS has had a tremendously positive impact on our communication and relationships, not only between our students and staff, but also with family members as sharing the information with them ahead of time has ensured that we all speak this common language.

WINONA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

 

PRODUCT: HOW WINONA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHES AND REINFORCES EXPECTATIONS AND RULES

WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
Winona Elementary School created a PBIS team during the 2013-14 school year and began implementing the process that was created by the team during the 2014-15 school year. The teachers and administrators saw the need to implement PBIS due to the large number of discipline referrals and the lack of a consistent discipline plan school-wide.

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
At the beginning of the school year, the teachers in each grade level hold grade-level meetings with the students to teach the rules and expectations. The motto, pledge and reinforcement systems are also taught. Throughout the school year, the principal announces the expectation of the day over the morning announcements, and the teachers reinforce the expectation with their students. There are visual reminders of the rules and expectations throughout the school. When a child is “caught following the expectations,” the child is recognized and rewarded with a positive note home to the parent and a tattoo to wear for the day. The tattoo states “WES RRR”; this tattoo represents “Winona Elementary School Is Respectful, Responsible, Ready.”

IMPACT
Since implementing our school-wide expectations and rules plan, office discipline referrals have greatly decreased.
• 2013-14 – 1,130 ODRs
• 2014-15 – 685 ODRs
• 2015-16 – 639 ODRs

DEVELOPING A SYSTEM FOR TEACHING APPROPRIATE BEHAVIOR

NEWTON COUNTY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

 

PRODUCT: OH, THE PLACES YOU CAN GO!

WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
Having been a PBIS Model Site for 10 years, our school is always looking for new and different ways to keep our students engaged in our PBIS process. Fortunately, collaboration between our counselor and our PBIS team typically results in ideas that keep our students involved and excited about the new initiatives on our campus.  

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT Upon reviewing the end-of-the-year surveys and recognizing the need to focus on the continuing development of goal-minded students, the decision was made to continue reinforcing our dropout prevention model. An “Oh, The Places You Can Go” wall was created in the cafeteria at the beginning of the first semester. The wall highlighted colleges, and resources made available by the institutions were shared with students. Each Friday a different college was spotlighted, and students were encouraged to wear that college’s colors on that day. Facts about the colleges were announced throughout the week, and the “spotlight” bulletin board was updated each week. On the last Friday of the semester, students wore the jerseys, shirts or colors of their college of choice. The campus was ablaze with “places to go!”  

IMPACT Reinforcing and rewarding our students for their positive and appropriate behavior is a big part of our PBIS process, but we also try to keep the vision of raising successful students with bright futures in focus. Although our students are young, we know the importance of teaching them early the importance of staying in school and making choices that will help them get to all the wonderful and exciting places we try to expose them to. “Oh, the places we hope they’ll go!”

 

NORTH PONTOTOC UPPER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

PRODUCT: TESTING RUBRICS TO INITIATE RESPONSIBLE TESTING BEHAVIORS WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
When the MAP test scores were released for the spring 2016 test, our PBIS team realized our students had apathy toward state testing and an “I don’t care” attitude toward the test. Our students were not acting “Ready and Responsible.” Instead, they were hurrying through the test and not working with fidelity before they marked an answer. The PBIS team developed a performance rubric for students to follow throughout the school year so that when the state test day arrived, the students would know what was expected of them to be “Ready and Responsible” test takers.

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT The performance rubric is a guide for students to follow while taking a test to help them work responsibly.  The math and language arts rubrics are tailored to the individual subjects. The students provide self-reflection on a rubric when they take a classroom test, and the teachers review it with them to ensure clear understanding of the expectations. When state testing arrives, the test administrator will fill out the same rubric for the students reflecting their behavior during the test. Students who receive a preset score on the rubrics will be rewarded after testing with predetermined rewards based on student survey results. The rewards will be announced to students before testing begins.

IMPACT Having an understanding of testing expectations prior to taking the test helps students behave in more responsible ways on the testing day. We want our students to try their best without getting discouraged, and we want to reinforce them based on the positive behaviors exemplified during testing.  

 

SPANN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

PRODUCT: MR. JONES’ GEM JARS

WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
Our PBIS goals at Spann Elementary School include reducing office referrals and increasing instructional time – empowering staff members in developing each scholar’s social competence and academic excellence. One of our model PBIS teachers, Richard Jones, clearly achieves these goals while reinforcing Spann Elementary School’s PBIS expectations of Respect, Responsibility, Relationships and Rigor.  The key to his success is an applied consistency with an intentional emphasis on these expectations, as well as incorporating positive methods of encouragement.

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
Mr. Jones’ classroom represents the true components of PBIS being implemented each and every day at Spann Elementary. Mr. Jones’ approach to teaching is demonstrated in the positive ways he defines his classroom rules and school-wide expectations. His learning environment is reflective of his strong dedication to the PBIS model. The learning environment is enhanced with teacher- and student-created anchor charts that represent key elements in learning. Mr. Jones reinforces lessons throughout the day to help students apply the standards of PBIS as he models the expectations of PBIS with his students. Unique to Mr. Jones’ classroom is his Gem Jars. He uses these motivational manipulatives to encourage positive behavior and celebrate academic success. Each quarter of his fourth grade classes has its own Gem Jar. Scholars earn colored glass stones by exhibiting positive PBIS expectations and passing their classroom subject area tests. His classes compete against each other in hearty games of “who can outshine the other.” At the end of each month, the class of “shining students” whose jar contains the most gems earns a party of their choice (popcorn party, healthy snacks, movie). The results are amazing!

IMPACT
During this 2016-17 school year, office referrals from his class have decreased approximately 70% compared to last year’s. For the first time in several years, the entire fourth grade is meeting expectations for STAR reading and math assessments – with a large percentage of individual students showing overall growth in academic proficiency. Based on data retrieved for FIT team meetings, we are convinced that Mr. Jones’ creative and witty approaches with PBIS teaching and learning have impacted his students both behaviorally and academically.  

STONEBRIDGE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

 

PRODUCT: TEACHING THE BULLDOG BARK

WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
StoneBridge Elementary School is a 2nd-3rd grade school, so every year Stonebridge’s PBIS system is new to at least half of our students. Our teachers know how important it is to introduce our system with enthusiasm! SWPBIS team members shared lesson plans with our staff that addressed the expectations for each location students would encounter at school. We value hands-on learning and giving examples, following the lesson plans teachers and students have used the first two days of school to discuss and practice all school-wide expectations. When we began planning our kick-off for the 2016-17 school year, we decided creating a funny video would be an engaging way to introduce our students to our expectations. Our lesson plans were developed in the summer before our first year of implementing SWPBIS at our school because we want teachers to have the tools they need to successfully participate in our school-wide PBIS system. The lesson plans were a major component, but we developed the video to create a more memorable experience for students.

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT We created a short video featuring one of our teachers as Miss Naughty, an SBE student having a difficult time learning our expectations. The video features clips of Miss Naughty in each location, struggling with expectations. An SBE student citing the expectations for the area follows each example. Students watched the video during our school-wide PBIS kick-off presentation. Parents were encouraged to view it by visiting our website, and teachers can play it in their classrooms again when a booster session is needed.

IMPACT Creating and teaching lesson plans that addressed Stonebridge’s school-wide expectations had a significant impact on our school. School ODRs decreased from 136 in the year before implementation to 65 our first year of implementation. The first semester ODRs decreased from 45 ODRs last year to 22 this year. Please view the video.  

DEVELOPING A SCHOOL-WIDE REINFORCEMENT SYSTEM

ABERDEEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

 

PRODUCT: THE DAWG POUND

WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
During the 2015-16 school year, the PBIS committee met numerous times and discussed the type of reinforcement we would like to give our students and how often this reinforcement would occur. We came to a consensus on a store that the students would have the opportunity to shop in monthly and spend their Bulldog Bucks. The store was constructed during the summer of 2016. The PBIS committee conducted a survey using Google with faculty and staff on the name of the store. The faculty and staff overwhelmingly chose the “Dawg Pound” as the store’s name.

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT The Dawg Pound has quickly become a hit with students, faculty and staff members. The store opens once a month for all the students in the building to spend their Bulldog Bucks. They complete a Dawg Pound ticket during their special area time in Mathtastic.  

IMPACT Since the implementation of PBIS and the grand opening of the Dawg Pound, the students and community have taken to Bulldog Bucks and the store in unexpected ways. The Dawg Pound has received donations from the Aberdeen Elementary PTO, the Aberdeen Knights football program, parents, community members, and even a local church. Since the implementation of Bulldog Bucks, parental involvement at after-school events has increased by 50% since the 2015-16 school year, as students who attend after-school events with their parents receive Bulldog Bucks.

 

LEAKE CENTRAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

PRODUCT: END OF THE YEAR POSITIVE BEHAVIOR LUAU

WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
We at Leake Central Elementary always try to recognize our students for positive behavior. We wanted to come up with a big event to show the students that their consistent positive behavior was not going unnoticed.

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
Teachers were given “Gator Bucks” to give to students who showed positive behavior (behavior that was acceptable in the classroom, hallway, cafeteria, etc.). Each area had rules posted as visual reminders to students on how they were expected to act. Teachers were then given instructions on how to use the Gator Bucks. They were told that they could give them to students who were following the school-wide or classroom rules or those who did something out of the ordinary for someone else (opening the door for someone who had his/her hands full, helping someone who dropped the contents of a backpack, etc.). Students were given Gator Bucks throughout the year with the option to either save them for the luau or spend them on different items during the month (hot chocolate, free homework pass, popcorn and a movie, wear jeans, etc.).  Most students chose to save their bucks for the luau.

IMPACT
The End of the Year Positive Behavior Luau is greatly successful. The PBIS team believes that the luau promotes positive behavior and outcomes that align with our goals as a PBIS model school. The team continues to find ways to recognize our students on a regular basis. We also continue to reward students at the end of the year for their positive behavior.  

 

MARY BETHUNE ALTERNATIVE CENTER

 
PRODUCT: PBIS POINT LEADERS OF THE WEEK

WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
The “PBIS Point Leaders of the Week” was developed by the PBIS team to recognize students who have met all daily/weekly behavioral goals and expectations. The school-wide mechanism used to monitor behavior is a daily point sheet. The point sheet has helped to create a systematic way to track behavior, provide expedient feedback, and identify PBIS Point Leaders of the Week. The point sheets are used as a decision-making tool in determining when students transition back to their home school.

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT Students are recognized as our PBIS Point Leaders of the Week for earning 95% of their weekly points.  Students who have reached their point goals are eligible to make the “PBIS Point Leaders of the Week” board. Our PBIS Point Leaders of the Week participate in off-campus trips, pizza parties and receive special treats.

IMPACT Students take more ownership for their behavior. Students are excited that they are being recognized and strive hard to be our PBIS Point Leaders of the Week. The recognition has given students a sense of pride. Students are more compliant with rules and expectations. Lastly, there has also been a marked decrease in behavior referrals.

NEWTON COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL

 

PRODUCT: GIANT HOUSE PARTY – CAMPUS EDITION

WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
With the need of a PBIS booster for the two campuses, the site PBIS middle and high school teams polled the students and identified some areas of need from the students’ input inclusive of requests for more student engagement opportunities and student leadership options. During collaboration and review of the first 10 years of PBIS implementation, a suggestion was made to introduce the House System, as some PBIS team members had just returned from a Ron Clark Academy onsite visit.

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT It was decided that a Middle School House System (6th-8th grades) and a High School House System (9th-12th grades) would be created, dividing students into multi-grade-level groups of no more than 50 (a number conducive to bus transportation for the PBIS Rewards System). At the Giant House Party, students drew envelopes (representing a house). The envelope contained a color, and the assembly was set up with the houses represented (by color and name) throughout the gymnasium.  House leaders had been previously nominated by the faculty to afford them the opportunity to be in place at the party, greeting the remaining members of the houses as the students opened their envelopes.

IMPACT The results of the implementation of the House System have surpassed the expectations of the site teams and have proven to be a major booster for the campus, now in its 10th year of PBIS implementation. Houses continue to compete for major rewards in the spring, which includes a winner from NCMS and NCHS. House leaders are instrumental in the fundraising and in meeting the challenge of securing the resources necessary for the major rewards to become a reality.

NORTH PONTOTOC UPPER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

 

PRODUCT: VIP RECOGNITION AND BREAKFAST WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
Our school is required to do progress monitoring three times a year to monitor student performance and  growth. In order to have accurate data to best serve our students, our PBIS team developed a VIP Club for students showing growth from one monitoring session or MAP testing session to the next.

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
The VIP Club consists of all students showing growth on their progress monitoring tests throughout the year. After our second progress monitoring test, students who showed growth were presented paper trophies with their names printed on them to hang outside their teachers’ doors. The trophy presentations were made by our very special guests, Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head. The students were given the opportunity to take a picture with Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head and then were allowed to place their trophies on the wall of fame in the hallways. Later in the week, students in the VIP Club were rewarded with a special breakfast served to them by their principal to congratulate them on their hard work. Pictures of the VIP breakfast recipients were hung in the common areas of the school. Each progress monitoring session will have different special guests awarding the trophies along with a different themed breakfast or luncheon.

IMPACT
Our PBIS system rewards our students’ positive behaviors, and we wanted these rewards to extend into our academic areas, as well. Expectations for student behavior and performance on progress monitoring tests are clearly established, with the VIP Club as a goal to strive for. The students are working harder in order to join the VIP Club. We will review our data at the end of each progress monitoring session to make any needed adjustments. We are using the academic data to show the behavior impacts on performance of intrinsic motivation from students.

PELAHATCHIE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

 

PRODUCT: PBIS VILLAGE TO INCREASE DESIRED BEHAVIOR DURING THE HOLIDAY SEASON WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED

After analyzing data from previous years and noting a trend of increased referrals during November and  December, the 4th-6th grade teachers at Pelahatchie Elementary School created a way to tap into the holiday excitement, while also motivating students to stay on the school’s PRIDE Path until winter break.  

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
The teachers and staff transformed their hallway into a holiday village, where each classroom was one shop in a village. The village included a bakery, train depot, “sELFie” Shop, bookstore, candy shop and cocoa café. Students created “price” lists using PRIDE passes or tickets earned for demonstrating the expected school-wide behaviors and what items they would like to have in the stores. The students were allowed to shop in their grade level during their recess times during the weeks leading up to the last day before student holidays in order to protect instructional time. It was also open on the last day for everyone to shop so they could spend the tickets they had earned during the holiday season.   

IMPACT
This seasonal reinforcement was just the thing to encourage students to make good choices during a hectic  and busy time of year. Students were eager to earn PRIDE passes and use them to shop for items they wanted because they had created the inventories. Students also gained the experience of placing value on different items and saved up tickets in order to buy more valuable items. It was a very successful endeavor.

POPLAR SPRINGS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

 

PRODUCT: PANDA POWER PBIS CELEBRATION DAYS WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED

Poplar Springs Elementary School established PBIS Celebration Days to reward students for showing “Panda Power” and for following school-wide expectations. Poplar Springs Elementary School has been a PBIS school for the past five years, and we have developed our process over the past several years to meet the needs of our students and teachers. This year we have incorporated the Panda Point Sheet, and we alternate each month between allowing students to select their incentive from a menu of choices and having  a whole group activity. Students use the Panda Points they have earned during the month for showing “Panda Power” to be able to participate in the PBIS Celebration Day.   

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
Each homeroom teacher has a Panda Point Sheet in their classroom, and each student can earn 5 points weekly from their teacher for following classroom expectations. The homeroom teacher does not have to give an actual Panda Point ticket. She tallies these points weekly on the Panda Point Sheet, which cuts down on students having to keep up with so many Panda Points and teachers having to count so many at the end of each month. Students also earn Panda Points throughout the rest of the campus from music, PE, gifted, special education and computer teachers, cafeteria workers, principals, counselors, our librarian and the interventionist. These are then given to the homeroom teacher by the students, and there is a column on the Panda Point Sheet where additional Panda Points can be added. Each month the homeroom teacher adds up all the Panda Points, and a note with the menu of choices is sent home to the parents so they know how many Panda Points their students have and can talk with them about how they will spend the points. This year we are alternating between having a menu of choices for the PBIS Celebration Days and a whole-group activity. The whole-group incentives occur during each grade-level specials time, and all students have the same incentive. The whole-group incentives for this year are October Tug-of-War, December Giving Feast, February Silly String War, and April Glow Dance Party. The other months have the menu of choices that changes from month to month in order to keep the students’ interest level in earning points high.  

IMPACT
The PBIS team reviews parent surveys yearly, and all comments regarding PBIS incentives are positive.  The PBIS Celebration Days promote positive behavior and outcomes that truly affect the climate of Poplar Springs. Students who show “Panda Power” are rewarded for following our school-wide expectations on a regular basis, and this promotes the energy for all students to strive to be the best that they can be. Students that do not earn enough Panda Points to attend the whole-group activities are gathered in one area, and these students are retaught school-wide expectations. This initiative has really motivated those students to improve the next month and earn more Panda Points.

PURVIS MIDDLE SCHOOL

PRODUCT: PURVIS MIDDLE SCHOOL TORNADO TICKETS WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
Improving student behaviors and academic outcomes is about making sure that all students have access  to the most effective practices and interventions available. PBIS has provided an operational framework for achieving these outcomes at Purvis Middle School. It provides a positive and effective alternative to traditional methods of discipline. PMS is one of 10 middle schools in Mississippi to be selected as a  state-wide model site. It is a great honor to be chosen to represent our school, district and the state. We  have numerous activities daily, weekly and monthly to recognize our students and staff for meeting our expectations of being respectful, responsible and safe.  

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
Throughout the school year, students at Purvis Middle School receive Tornado Tickets for exhibiting  respectful, responsible and safe behavior, which can be turned in for special rewards. The idea of the Purvis Middle School Barn Dance was generated by students, staff and administrators. It was fully supported by our PBIS team, as it served as a positive reinforcement by allowing students to be rewarded for exemplary behavior for the first nine weeks of school. On October 14, a record number of Tornado Tickets were turned in by our students to participate in the the Barn Dance at our Community Multipurpose Center. Students were able to take pictures with friends in the photo booth, sing karaoke, play games and line dance to great music. It was a great success!  

IMPACT
Purvis Middle School is home to 404 students. With office discipline referrals down for not only the first  nine weeks, but also the first semester, positive reinforcement through PBIS appears to be successful for both our students and staff.

SOUTH PONTOTOC ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

PRODUCT: COUGAR CASH IN STORE WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
Students at South Pontotoc Elementary School have the opportunity to earn multiple Cougar Paws  throughout the school day for exhibiting behaviors consistent with our GRRR Expectations. Staff and students saw the need to create a store where students could cash in the Cougar Paws for both tangible and intangible items.  

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
Students at South Pontotoc Elementary were very excited about earning Cougar Paws but often asked what  they could obtain with the Paws. The PBIS team developed a Cougar Cash-in Store, where students can cash in their Paws every nine weeks. Students are able to purchase tangible reward items such as tattoos, pencils, erasers, jumping frogs, straws, bouncy balls, light-up rings, footballs, yo-yos, stress balls, kites, earbuds and flashlight pens. However, many of our students often purchase the intangible rewards. They love being the center of attention at a Wii party, or purchasing extra recess, sitting with a friend at lunch, a picnic lunch, making the GRRR announcements, reading to a class, wearing a hat, or wearing pajamas to school. Volunteers often assist staff on Cash-in Day. They have given lots of compliments to our students about their GRRReat behavior!  

IMPACT
Using Cougar Paws and allowing students to be actively involved in choosing the rewards has helped  our  PBIS process to become even more meaningful and successful. It has also allowed it to become a joint endeavor between our students, faculty, parents, and community.

WINONA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

PRODUCT: TIGER TOKEN PROGRAM WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
The Tiger Token Program was designed to increase consistent use of strategies for positive teaching  and reinforcement within a classroom of children. The PBIS team developed the plan with input from parents. The PBIS team meets monthly to study discipline data. If the team discovers an increase in office discipline referrals, a Tiger Token Week is planned. Data compiled from weeks prior to holidays shows  historical evidence that office discipline referrals (ODRs) will increase at Winona Elementary School;  therefore, school-wide rules and expectations are reinforced more during these months, and Tiger Token Weeks are held.  

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
During Tiger Token Weeks, all faculty and staff members are given an allotment of tokens. Tokens are  awarded to classes when the entire class demonstrates the school-wide expectations of being “Respectful, Responsible and Ready.” An example of an opportunity to award a token is when all class members are observed following the hallway rules. When a teacher is given a token for his/her students’ behavior, he/she displays the token on a special “Respectful, Responsible, Ready” board outside the classroom. At the end of the week, the classes with a pre-determined “magic number” of tokens get rewarded. Examples of rewards include Kool-Aid pickles and class sets of PBIS Frisbees, along with an extra recess.  

IMPACT
Since implementing our PBIS plan in 2013, ODRs have greatly decreased: • 2013-14 – 1,130 ODRs • 2014-15 – 686 ODRs • 2015-16 – 639 ODRs  

 

OFFICE DISCIPLINE REFERRAL PROCESS  

MARION PARK ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL  

PRODUCT: MARION PARK REFERRAL AND RESTORATIVE JUSTICE PROCESSES WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
Marion Park School’s discipline referral process and products were developed by the MPSD district office to address and record discipline. Three forms are utilized in the process, if necessary: the Corrective Strategies Form, the Office Referral Form, and the Restorative Justice Conference/Agreement Form.  

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
Students are encouraged to earn all of their points on their Daily Behavior Report. However, when students  struggle to meet the expectations and infractions occur, teachers must follow the Corrective Strategies Form for low-level infractions, which include the following: • First Minor Infraction: Redirection and Reteach • Second Minor Infraction: Student Conference • Third Minor Infraction: Parent Contact • Fourth Minor Infraction: Written Assignment • Fifth Minor Infraction: After-School Detention Students with higher-level infractions (Level 4 or 5) can be sent directly to an administrator using the Office Referral Form. Restorative justice conferences are also held to repair situations and relationships using the Restorative Justice Conference/Agreement Form.  

IMPACT
Having a clear and consistent discipline process in place has positively impacted both staff and students.  Having the discipline documents allows us to record, track and address discipline in a proactive manner.

 

ESTABLISHING A SWPBIS TEAM AND BUY-IN

MARION PARK ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL

PRODUCT: PBIS TEAM-BUILDING, SPIRIT OF THE PHOENIX GAME, AND MARION PARK SUPER HEROS WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
The Marion Park School PBIS team meets at least once a month (in addition to our regular team meetings  that are held once a week). Our teams discuss PBIS, discipline data, student issues, and ways to improve the overall school climate. In brainstorming ideas of ways to reinforce our staff, the PBIS team came up with team-building activities that were not only morale boosters, but year-long, school-wide activities that continuously foster and increase team spirit.  

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
All faculty and staff members are assigned to a team. Teams earn points through different events throughout the year. Points are kept on a bulletin board in the teacher’s lounge. Events include things like the ugliest Christmas sweater contest, best costume during Spirit Week, as well as food contests like our Chili Cook-off, best tailgate dish, etc. (team members love to eat). We also have “Fighting for Good Behavior” Day, and our teachers dress in their best camouflage. Additionally, as a fun initiative, all faculty and staff members were given superhero names at the beginning of the year, and their superhero names are posted on a bulletin board in the teacher’s lounge. This was a huge boost for teachers. Teachers took pictures of the board and would post their names and pictures on Facebook. This activity promoted positive feelings for our staff members. Who doesn’t want a superhero name?  

IMPACT
Our ultimate goal is to make our faculty and staff feel appreciated and give the overall climate of our school a positive lift. Follow-up surveys indicate that our faculty and staff feel these things have definitely improved the spirit and boosted the morale of our school.

 

RANKIN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT PBIS TEAM

PRODUCT: DISTRICT PBIS MODEL SCHOOL PRESENTATIONS WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
As we all know, a key factor in the success of a PBIS process is administrator support. For this reason, when establishing a SWPBIS team, our district personnel worked together to come up with what we believed would be the most effective way to get that critical buy-in.  

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
Our district personnel decided the most proactive way for our district would be to not mandate that the schools in our district implement PBIS. Instead, we have waited until the principal of each school comes to us and says they are ready to move forward. Once this happens, we have a district PBIS person guide the school through the process of preparing for implementation. We have met weekly for a semester with some schools. Others have wanted to move forward immediately so we have done a PBIS boot camp of sorts and met for two full days preparing.  

IMPACT
We have had slow but sure success. We started in 2009 with our first school. We have added one or two schools each year. At this time, we have 16 schools implementing PBIS completely, two schools implementing elements of PBIS, 10 PBIS model sites, and one Tier 2 model site. We will have another high school start the process in January 2017. We strive to continue reinforcing the PBIS process in the Rankin County School District. One way is to give recognition to our model school sites at a Rankin County School Board meeting or administrator meeting. As each school accomplishes becoming a model school, they are presented a perpetual plaque. Schools who continue their PBIS journeys receive the same recognition with a current year added to their plaque.

 

WINONA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

PRODUCT: WINONA SCHOOL DISTRICT’S TEAMING PLAN FOR PBIS WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED  
The Teaming Plan was developed while seeking ways to provide cost-effective award opportunities for students at Winona Elementary School. With representation from WES grade-level and activity teachers, PTO parents, the district special projects coordinator, the elementary guidance counselor, and principals from all campuses, the creation of the plan had input from many valuable stakeholders.  

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
The Winona School District’s support staff and high school administration volunteer their services to help better PBIS by reducing the expense of PBIS positive behavior rewards. Grants have been written by the district special projects coordinator. These grants have allowed for students to visit the Grammy Museum in Cleveland, Mississippi. The Mobile Music Lab from Delta State University was brought on campus through these grant efforts, as well. The administration at Winona Secondary School has invited students to high school pep rallies. Also, students have been given the opportunity to make and present special signs for the annual Homecoming pep rally held on the WES campus. Because Winona School District works within a small budget, the PBIS team has creatively developed the teaming process throughout the district, and the impact has shown in ODR data, as well as a strong district-wide culture that recognizes students for exhibiting good behavior.   

IMPACT
Since the creation and implementation of the Winona School District PBIS teaming plan, not only have more students been positively reinforced for having good behavior, but more of our stakeholders are actively involved in our PBIS process.

  • Delta State’s Mobile Music Lab – Twenty-four second and third graders were invited to attend the program.
  • Grammy Museum Field Trip – Fifty fourth through sixth graders were invited on the field trip.
  • High School Pep Rally – Thirty kindergarten through 6th graders were invited to the pep rally.
  • Homecoming Pep Rally – Twenty-five third and fourth graders created signs for the pep rally.  

 

BUILDING FACULTY, STAFF AND FAMILY/COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

BANKSTON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

PRODUCT: THE MILLION FATHER MARCH WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
The Million Father March was created as an opportunity for men to show their commitment to the educational lives of their children throughout the school year. Our version was based on the international movement that has taken place since 2004, allowing fathers and other significant male caregivers of all races from all over the world to make year-long commitments to their child’s/children’s educational success.  

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
Our Million Father March took place on Thursday, September 18, 2016, with 50 in attendance. The men (and a few women) lined the hallways to greet students with high fives, handshakes and hugs as they walked to class. They also led the students in reciting the school district’s mission and vision statements, the motto, and the morning announcements over the intercom. After a light breakfast, a local minister spoke on the importance of parental involvement. The attendees were given participation certificates and signed commitment contracts.  

IMPACT
On October 12, 2016, the men organized a meeting. They created the KBS Support League. Their first “duty” as the KBS Support League was to plan and implement a program for the school’s Red Ribbon Week festivities. The program was a great success! The group is fully committed to their children’s educational success. The KBS Support League continues to gather at the school each month to mentor, volunteer in the classrooms, and monitor the hallways and cafeteria. While our number of volunteers many not equal a million, these men (and women) have surely made our students feel like a million bucks this school year!

 

EARL TRAVILLION ATTENDANCE CENTER

PRODUCT: GAME DAY AT THE ROCK WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
This exciting and successful event was created as an opportunity to not only encourage students to show/ use their school-wide expectations and to keep referrals down, but also as a way to involve members of our community in our PBIS process.  

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
The students at Earl Travillion Attendance Center were encouraged by teachers and administration to earn at least 10 Tiger Tickets for a pep rally with Seymour, the mascot of the Southern Miss Golden Eagles, and the chance to enjoy game day at USM’s M.M. Roberts Stadium, also known as “The Rock,” in the month of November. ETAC students earn Tiger Tickets by showing the school-wide expectations: Be Respectful. Be Responsible. Be Safe. Be Prepared. Be Positive. With the required 10 Tiger Tickets, 50 students were selected to attend the University of Southern Miss vs. Charlotte football game. Seymour was even on hand to personally hand out the permission slips.  

IMPACT
After the event, “Continued Level I Behavior” decreased by 11 referrals, while “Inappropriate Behavior” decreased by four. The overall number of “Continued Level I Behavior” referrals have decreased by over 50% since the 2015 school year via the implementation of PBIS. Earl Travillion Attendance Center is proud to use and encourage PBIS on our campus and in our community.

HOUSTON LOWER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

PRODUCT: CITY WALK HOUSTON LOWER ELEMENTARY WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED We love to celebrate students who are respectful, responsible and ready each day. We have different rewards each nine weeks for students who have no ODR’s. The City Walk was developed to be a unique beginning of-the-year reward that would benefit our schools, as well as our community.  

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
“It takes a village to raise a child” is an old and popular proverb that still rings true today. At HLES, we believe that the whole community has a crucial role in the lives of our students. During our City Walk, students who have not had an ODR get to walk around our beloved city making special stops along the way. Students get to visit the fire station, police station, library, city hall and the bank. At each stop, they learn more about how those in our community work to make Houston a better place. They are also generously rewarded at each stop with goody bags and treats provided by these community helpers. Students are challenged with what they can do to help their community. They are encouraged to stay in school, keep their city clean by not littering, and do kind things for others. Lastly, we end our City Walk with a picnic lunch at school and a special recess.   

IMPACT
The partnerships established between those in our community and our school during the City Walk are priceless as the school year begins. Students remember what it was like to sit in the fire truck, strike the mayor’s gavel, and see stories come to life at the Carnegie Library. The reinforcer promotes positive behavior not only by the event, but also by the encouragement of so many community helpers that our students look up to. The positive outcomes from this day align with our goals as a PBIS model school and rewards students who follow the rules on a regular basis. Those who are unable to attend are met with to discuss school rules and procedures. Our referrals have decreased by an average of 53 percent since this reinforcer was added.

 

NEWTON COUNTY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

PRODUCT: FAMILY NIGHT IN WINTER WONDERLAND WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
In an effort to continue to sow the seeds of PBIS at Newton County Elementary, the grade-level representatives on the PBIS team consistently look for ways to build meaningful family and community involvement and collaboration. The team decided to host a family event that would create an opportunity to stay in contact with and connected to our family members.

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
Parents and guardians were invited to take an hour from the busy holiday season and join us to paint ornaments and decorate cookies alongside their children. During this time, the NCE PBIS expectations were reviewed with the families. We felt this platform provided a wonderful opportunity for us to continue to build relationships with our families.

IMPACT
Data collected from surveys administered after the event noted that our families thoroughly enjoyed the night and would very much like to attend a similar event in the future.

NEWTON COUNTY MIDDLE SCHOOL

PRODUCT: FAMILY AND COMMUNITY SUPPORT FROM HOUSE TO HOUSE WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
With the introduction of the new PBIS House Booster on the Newton County Middle School and High School campuses, the PBIS team knew there would need to be an introduction for our stakeholders. The night was designed to not only share information, but also to build community and family support for the new initiative.

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
Parents, guardians, family members and community leaders were invited to a “Meet and Greet,” where they were met by “House Leaders” who introduced the “House” system. They were then given tours to see the new additions to the campus. Students had opportunities to meet legislative representatives and exchange notes on how the “House” systems were similar when identified, whether speaking from a government or campus standpoint.

IMPACT
As students connected with community and family members, the success of the night was realized. Team members who evaluated the performance of the student leaders were struck by the pride and mature attitudes exhibited. Our visitors were extremely complimentary as well, praising the students, the new initiative, and the entire PBIS process on our campus.

 

NORTHWEST RANKIN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

PRODUCT: FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL SCAVENGER HUNT WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
As with any school setting, employees spend more time with their co-workers than they do with their own families. As a result, we believe it is important to cultivate a caring work environment where staff are invested and are excited about coming to work every day. We believe that the teachers’ enthusiasm for being at school is contagious, energizing the students to want to be at school every day as well.

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
Staff bonding, collaboration and a fun faculty environment have always been things that Northwest Rankin Elementary strives for year after year. Oftentimes when visitors come to our building, they sense the “family” atmosphere and comment on the closeness of our staff. At the beginning of the year, it was vital to embrace our new staff members and make sure they felt like a part of our team. On the first day our faculty returned to school from summer vacation, we conducted an employee/community scavenger hunt. Dividing the staff into teams (blending grade levels and enrichment teachers - both classified and certified), they were given the task of taking various pictures of community landmarks, public businesses and area commerce leaders with their team. Faculty teams were labeled by color. Little did we know this “Color War” would continue throughout the school. After that fun-filled scavenger hunt where new relationships were formed, teams started doing random acts of kindness or pranks on other staff members. It’s not uncommon to walk into the building on a random morning and see all of the doors covered in red or to find sweet treats that all revolve around the color blue (blueberry muffins, blue Rice Krispies treats, blue gum, etc.). These “Color War” teams also created fun videos that were shared with our staff and students for The Mannequin Challenge. When these random videos unexpectedly pop up or small thoughts of love and laughter appear throughout the week, it brings cheer during what could be long stretches of teaching. Another bright spot in our unexpected Color War was showing up one morning to find sticky notes covering the front door with words of encouragement not only for our staff members, but for our students as well. This, in turn, sparked others to add their sticky notes to those they wanted to encourage and support. The dynamics of these simple actions are helping students emulate the core values they have been taught.

IMPACT
We never expected our first day of school scavenger hunt would have such an impact on our faculty.  However, by devoting time to develop relationships, when their paths might not have otherwise crossed, friendships were formed early on. The time spent at the beginning of the year has cultivated a loving and supportive environment that continues throughout the year.

 

SUDDUTH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

PRODUCT: EVERYONE COMMUNICATES – FEW CONNECT WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED
Sudduth Elementary uses several strategies to enhance communication and help our faculty and staff feel appreciated. Our school is implementing “The Leader in Me” this year. To expand our study of The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, we have implemented an activity where everyone will receive inspirational messages/notes from other faculty and staff members.

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT
Everyone will receive an envelope with their name on it. There are papers in the envelope with a list of names and a space to write a message. There are also a few blank ones to use for additional co-workers of their choosing. The papers are completed stating how they appreciate this person, how they enjoy working with this person, or what makes that person special to them. If they don’t know the person we suggest saying “I would enjoy getting to know you because… you seem fun, smart, happy, exciting, etc.” Envelopes are then returned and separated so that everyone’s messages are in their envelope. The envelopes are given out at our staff Christmas party with great joy. Another activity that we have done for our staff appreciation is entitled “Souper Synergizers”. The SWPBIS team provided lunch for the faculty and staff in February which was the month that we emphasized the 7th habit: Synergize. This luncheon was to celebrate that we work together and use the talents of our group to create a better whole than the sum of its parts. These two initiatives were implemented by the SWPBIS team to encourage and boost our staff morale. We recognize that education is a difficult job and we want our faculty and staff to know that we appreciate them and that we are all working together so that our students can be successful while in school but can also be leaders in their homes and communities.

IMPACT
The impact on our school from implementing staff communication and appreciation activities has been very positive. Via their feedback, we know that our faculty and staff are happier and enjoy coming to work at a place where they feel appreciated and loved.

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES

School-Wide Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (Tier 1)
This two-day training provides the participant the opportunity to learn all of the necessary Critical Elements of SWPBIS in order to implement systems change regarding Tier 1 of the Response to Intervention initiative. It is highly recommended that a school-based team attend the training. The team should include, but is not limited to, school administrators, general education teachers, special        education teachers, behavioral specialists and family members.

Team Leader SWPBIS (Tier1)
This one-day training for PBIS Model Sites will provide the participants the opportunity to enhance their skills of being a SWPBIS Team Leader. Participants will develop skills in conducting effective team meetings, delegating responsibilities to other team members, and making data-based decisions at the school-wide level.  

Tier 2 Interventions and System for Behavioral Support
This two-day training will provide the participants the opportunity to begin to build systems necessary to provide Tier 2 behavioral supports and services. These systems will include, but are not limited to, data collection (Tier 1 and Tier 2), interventions and progress monitoring. In addition, Mississippi’s Response to Interventions timelines and recommendations will be presented. It is highly recommended that a school-based team attend the training. The team should include, but is not limited to, school administrators, general education teachers, special education teachers, behavioral specialists and family members.

Tier 3 Systems and Interventions for Behavioral Support
This two-day training will provide the participants the opportunity to begin to build systems necessary to provide Tier 3 behavioral supports and services. These systems will include, but are not limited to, data collection, interventions and progress monitoring. Practical Functional Behavior Assessments, Behavior Intervention Plans and Mississippi’s Response to Interventions timelines and recommendations will be presented. The school’s Teacher Support Team (TST) members, including the school administrator, should attend this training.

 

PBIS SEEDS CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

REACH-MS is excited to announce an opportunity for schools and districts implementing Positive Behavior interventions and Supports in Mississippi. We are looking for outstanding examples of your PBIS efforts to share with others via our website and in PBIS SEEDS: See Excellence Emerge ¡n our Districts and Schools. Products submitted must clearly demonstrate one or more of the critical elements for implementation of PBIS listed below.

Up to twenty (20) products will be selected by a review panel including REACH MS staff and other stakeholders. Products demonstrating exemplary practices relating to the critical elements of “Teaching” and “Data Entry and Analysis” are particularly sought.  A $250 stipend will be provided for each of the twenty selected entries.

Critical Elements

Example of Products

Identifying School-wide Expectations and Rules

Clearly and positively stated expectations and/or rules, pictures of creative ways to post expectations, rules and mission statements throughout your school and/or district, newsletter articles you’ve sent out with the expectations/rules in them, student planners with the expectations/rules described, etc.

Developing a System for Teaching Appropriate Behavior

Lesson plans used for teaching the expectations/rules with pictures (if you have them), lesson plans where the expectation and/or rules have been imbedded into the content with pictures (if you have them), video clips (less than 5 minutes) of the teaching, etc.

Developing a School-wide Reinforcement System

Pictures and plans from staff reinforcers, pictures and plans from student reinforcers, etc.

Office Discipline Referral Process

Referral process in narrative or visual form, definitions of problem behaviors, continuum of consequences, office discipline referral form, ODR graphs (by month, location, type of behavior, time of day), etc.

Data Entry and Analysis

Your process for sharing data with stakeholders. Any complete data packages (graphs, charts, etc…) showing a decrease in Office Discipline Referrals for a school year. Your process for using data for decision making.

Establish a SWPBIS Team and Buy-in

Documentation, examples, photos, etc., that demonstrate effective teaming at the school and/or district level.

Building Faculty, Staff, and Family Involvement

Examples of strategies used to enhance communication, motivation and meaningful involvement of faculty and family members. Please provide outcome data resulting from these efforts.

Submissions must be sent electronically by November 17, 2017. Please carefully follow all directions and review the scoring rubric prior to compiling your submission. You will be notified of our selections via e-mail. There is no limit on the number of submissions, but each product must be submitted using a separate application.  By submitting your products and examples, you are certifying that you have the authority to disseminate all materials submitted (including permission to publish photos, video, etc. of any persons identifiable) and are giving REACH-MS, the MS Department of Education, and/or the U.S. Department of Education permission to use these products in products, trainings, and materials without further compensation.                     

APPLICATION FOR NEXT VOLUME OF PBIS SEEDS

 

RUBRIC FOR SUBMISSIONS TO PBIS SEEDS

 

REACH MS PBIS MODEL SITES  

ALCORN COUNTY

Alcorn Central High School (9-12)
Alcorn County School District
Contact: Twila Bridges, Team Leader
662.286.8720; tbridges@alcornschools.org

CHICKASAW COUNTY

Houston Lower Elementary School (K-2)
Houston School District
Contact: Robert Winter, Principal
662.456.3323; rwinters@houston.k12.ms.us
Houston Middle School (6-8)
Houston School District
Contact: Susan Weaver, Assistant Principal
662.456.5174, sweaver@houston.k12.ms.us
632A Starkville St., Houston, MS Houston
Upper Elementary School (3-5) Houston
School District
Contact: John Ellison, Principal
662.456.3332; jellison@houston.k12.ms.us
Houston High School
Houston School District
Contact: Dr. Elizabeth Harrison, Team Leader
662.456.3320; eharrison@houston.k12.ms.us

FORREST COUNTY

Dixie Attendance Center (K-8)
Forrest County School District
Contact: Erinne Ball, Team Leader
601.582.4890; eball@forrest.k12.ms.us
Earl Travillion Attendance Center (K-6)
Forrest County School District
Contact: Julia Maxie, Team Leader
601.584.9303; jmaxie@forrest.k12.ms.us
Mary Bethune Alternative Center
Hattiesburg Public School District
Contact: Kizza Ramsey, Team Leader
601.584.6311; kizza.ramsey@hattiesburgpsd.com
North Forrest Elementary School (K-6)
Forrest County School District
Contact: Stacey Tapper, Team Leader
601.584.6466; stapper@forrest.k12.ms.us
Rawls Springs Attendance Center (K-6)
Forrest County School District
Contact: Malia Triggs, Principal
601.268.2217; mtriggs@forrest.k12.ms.us
South Forrest Attendance Center (K-8)
Contact: Karen McCrary, Principal
601.545.7714; kmccrary@forrest.k12.ms.us

HARRISON COUNTY

Delisle Elementary School (K-4)
Pass Christian School District
Contact: Mandy Lacy, Assistant Principal
228.255.6219; mlacy@pc.k12.ms.us
Harper McCaughan Elementary School (4-6)
Long Beach School District
Contact: Dr. Jenny Webber, Assistant Principal
228.863.0478; webberj@lbsdk12.com
North Bay Elementary School (K-5)
Biloxi School District
Contact: Dr. Laurie Pitre, Principal
228.435.6166; laurie.pitre@biloxischools.net
W.J. Quarles Elementary School (K-3)
Long Beach School District
Contact: Wendy Hertz
228.864.3946; wendy.hertz@lbsdk12.com

HINDS COUNTY

Brown Elementary School
Jackson Public School District
Contact: Valerie Russell, Team Leader
601.960.5325; vrussell@jackson.k12.ms.us
Casey Elementary School (K-5)
Jackson Public Schools
Contact: Leslie Coleman, Principal
601.987.3510; lecoleman@jackson.k12.ms.us
McWillie Elementary School (PK-6)
Jackson Public Schools
Contact: Linda Bodam, Team Leader
601.987.3709; lbodam@jackson.k12.ms.us
Poindexter Elementary School (PK-5)
Jackson Public Schools
Contact: Jenelia Branson, Team Leader
601.960.5304; jbranson@jackson.k12.ms.us
Spann Elementary School (K-5)
Jackson Public Schools
Contact: Nicole Menotti, Principal
601.987.3532; nimenotti@jackson.k12.ms.us

LAMAR COUNTY

Oak Grove Lower Elementary School (2-3)
Lamar County School District
Contact: Anna Morris, Team Leader
601.268.3862; anna.morris@lamarcountyschools.org
Purvis Middle School (6-8) Lamar
County School District Contact:
Melissa Knight, Team Leader  
601.794.1068;
melissa.knight@lamarcountyschools.org

LAUDERDALE COUNTY

Carver Middle School (6-8)
Meridian Public School District
Contact: Carla Perkins, Behavior Counselor
601.481.2089; cperkins@mpsdk12.net
Southeast Elementary School (PK-4)
Lauderdale County School District
Contact: Steven Holifield, Assistant Principal
601.486.2500; sholifield@lauderdale.k12.ms.us

LEAKE COUNTY

Leake County Elementary School (PK-6)
Leake County School District
Contact: Jennifer Nettles, Team Leader
601.253.2324; jnettles@leakesd.org
Leake Central Elementary School (PK-5)
Leake County School District
Contact: Donna Pope, Administrator
601.267.9148; dpope@leakesd.org

LEE COUNTY

Shannon High School (9-12)
Lee County School District
Contact: Carla Mooneyhan, Team Leader
662.767.9566;
carla.mooneyhan@leecountyschools.us

LEFLORE COUNTY

Bankston Elementary School (PK-6)
Greenwood School District
Contact: Kirby Love, Principal
662.455.7421; kirbylove@greenwood.k12.ms.us
East Elementary School (Grades 5-8)
Leflore County School District
Contact: Edmond Williams, Principal
662.453.9182; ewilliams@lefcsd.org
Threadgill Elementary School (PK-6)
Greenwood School District
Contact: Lachada Robie, Principal
662.455.7440; lachadarobie@greenwood.k12.ms.us

MADISON COUNTY

Ann Smith Elementary School (PK-2)
Madison County School District
Contact: Dr. Melissa Philley, Principal
601.856.6621; mphilley@madison-schools.com
Madison Avenue Upper Elementary School
Madison County School District
Contact: Kim Hurst, Principal
601.856.6609; khurst@madison-schools.com

NEWTON COUNTY

Newton County Elementary School (K-4)
Newton County School District
Contact: Tracy Holliman, Team Leader  
601.635.2956; tholliman@newton.k12.ms.us
Newton County High School (9-12)
Newton County School District
Contact: Suzanne Cain, Team Leader
601.635.3347; scain@newton.k12.ms.us
Newton County Middle School (5-8)
Newton County School District
Contact: Tabitha Chaney, Team Leader  
601.635.4261; tchaney@newton.k12.ms.us

OKTIBBEHA COUNTY

Sudduth Elementary School (K-2)
*Tier 1 and Tier 2 Model Site
Starkville Oktibbeha Consolidated School District
Contact: Elizabeth Mosley, Principal
662.324.4150; emosley@starkville.k12.ms.us
Ward Stewart Elementary School (3-4)
*Tier 1 and Tier 2 Model Site
Starkville Oktibbeha Consolidated School District
Contact: Diane Baker, Principal
662.324.4150; dbaker@starkville.k12.ms.us

HARRISON COUNTY

Pass Christian Elementary School
Pass Christian School District
Contact: Kristy Wheat, Assistant Principal
228.452.5200; kwheat@pc.k12.ms.us

PEARL RIVER COUNTY

Pearl River Central Middle School (6-8)
Pearl River County School District
Contact: Denise Rouse, School Social Worker
601.798.5654 (Ext. 6007); drouse@prc.k12.ms.us

PONTOTOC COUNTY

North Pontotoc Upper Elementary School (5-6)
*Tier 1 and Tier 2 Model Site
Pontotoc County School District
Contact: Libby Young, Principal
662.489.2295; lyoung@pcsd.k12.ms.us
Pontotoc Middle School (5-6)
Pontotoc City School District
Contact: Gwyn Russell, Principal
662.489.6056; grussell@pontotoc.k12.ms.us
South Pontotoc Elementary School (K-5)
Pontotoc County School District
Contact: Lisa Williamson, Principal
662.489.3476; lwilliamson@pcsd.k12.ms.us
South Pontotoc Middle School (6-8)
Pontotoc County School District
Contact: Kelly Clark, Team Leader  
662.489.2479; kclark@pcsd.k12.ms.us

RANKIN COUNTY

Flowood Elementary School (K-5)
Rankin County School District
Contact: Lacey Kirkendall, Team Leader
601.992.6277; lacey.kuyrkendall@rcsd.ms
McLaurin Elementary School (PK-6)
Rankin County School District
Contact: Michelle Nowlin, Principal
601.845.2127; mnowlin@rcsd.k12.ms.us
Northshore Elementary School (K-6)
Rankin County School District
Contact: Lee Pambianchi, Principal
601.992.5279; lee.pambianchi@rcsd.ms
Northwest Rankin Elementary School (K-5) 
*Tier 1 and Tier 2 Model Site
Rankin County School District
Contact: Kara Killough, Principal
601.992.0924; kara.killough@rcsd.ms
Pelahatchie Elementary School (K-6)
Rankin County School District
Contact: Dana Lee, Team Leader
601.854.8060; dana.lee@rcsd.ms
Richland Elementary School (K-2)
Rankin County School District
Contact: Dr. Pamela Simon Reed, Principal
601.939.4375; pamela.reedsimon@rcsd.ms
Richland Upper Elementary School (3-6)
Rankin County School District
Contact: Toby Price
601.939.2288; toby.price@rcsd.ms
Richland High School
Rankin County School District
Contact: Brandy Byrd, Team Leader
601.939.5144; brandy.byrd@rcsd.ms
Steen’s Creek Elementary School (K-2)
Rankin County School District
Contact: Catie Gunn, Principal
601.845.6577; cgunn@rcsd.ms
Stonebridge Elementary School (2-3)
Rankin County School District
Contact: Angela Nichols, Principal
601.824.3287; anichols@rcsd.ms
Rankin County Youth Detention Center
Rankin County Sheriff ’s Office
Contact: Michelle Rhodes, Director
601.824.2553; mrhodes@rankincounty.org

WARREN COUNTY

Beechwood Elementary School (K-6)
Vicksburg Warren School District
Contact: Tamikia Billings, Assistant Principal
601.638.3875;  tbillings@vwsd.k12.ms.us

YAZOO COUNTY

Yazoo City Alternative School 
Yazoo City School District
Contact: Gregg Giles, Principal
662.746.0985; ggiles@yazoocity.k12.ms.us

 

If you would like to visit a school that is implementing school-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports, please contact one of these model sites. Each school listed has passed an external evaluation verifying implementation of PBIS, including all critical elements, with fidelity. More schools are being added to our list all the time, so visit www.usm.edu/reachms for the most up-to-date list of model sites. If your school is implementing PBIS and would like to be included as a model site, please contact us to schedule an on-site evaluation.

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REACH MS: Mississippi’s State Personnel Development Grant

REACH MS: MISSISSIPPI’S STATE PERSONNEL DEVELOPMENT GRANT
DEPARTMENT OF CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION AND SPECIAL EDUCATION
118 College Drive #5057
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001

Phone: 601.266.4693  Fax: 601.266.4691
Website: www.usm.edu/reachms
Email: REACHMS@usm.edu AA/EOE/ADAI    UC 76117.5057 3.17