Facts to Know

The University of Southern Mississippi complies with applicable state and federal regulations, including Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Title IX), which prohibits sex discrimination in any education program or activity receiving federal funding.

The University is committed to providing and maintaining a safe and inclusive living and working environment for its students, faculty, and staff that is free from all forms of discrimination and sexual misconduct.

To this end, The University of Southern Mississippi will not tolerate discrimination and sexual misconduct. Through the University’s Sexual Misconduct Policy and applicable procedures, the University provides a process to address allegations of discrimination, harassment (gender-based or sexual), intimate partner violence, stalking, sexual exploitation, and sexual assault.

The University prohibits retaliation against anyone who reports or witnesses an incident of possible sexual misconduct.  Employees or students who engage in retaliation will face disciplinary action up to and including separation from The University. 

For more information about Title IX, see the Office of Civil Rights website.

 

  • One in 4 college-aged women report experiences that meet the legal definitions of rape or attempted rape.
  • Most survivors of sexual assaults are full-time students.
  • 80-90% of sexual assaults are perpetrated by individuals known to the survivor.
  • 85% of rapes are committed by a person the victim knows.
  • In a recent study by the National Institute of Justice, survivors of rape knew their attackers as:
  • Fellow classmates (35.5%)
  • Friends (34.2%)
  • Boyfriends or ex-boyfriends (23.7%)
  • Acquaintance (2.6%)
  • In a survey of students at 171 institutions of higher education, alcohol was involved in 74% of all sexual assaults.
  • Every two minutes, someone in the U.S. is sexual assaulted.
  • 54% of sexual assaults are not reported to the police.
  • Sexual harassment includes:
  • verbal;
  • nonverbal
  • physical behavior.
  • Behavior that creates a sexually hostile learning or working environment is also sexual harassment.
    • Examples of sexual harassment include:
      • unwanted and unwelcome lewd jokes;
      • gender-based slurs; and
      • sexual contact.
  • Sexual harassment can occur between people of the same sex.
  • Whether the harassment occurs between a man and a women or people of the same sex, it’s still against the law.
  • The victim of sexual harassment does not have to be the person directly harassed but could be anyone affected by the offensive conduct.