Skills History Teaches: Research
Critical and Close Reading
Forming Arguments
Skills History Teaches: Writing
Skills History Teaches: Oral Presentations
Skills History Teaches: Research
Critical and Close Reading
Forming Arguments
Skills History Teaches: Writing
Skills History Teaches: Oral Presentations

Why Study History?

9 Reasons to Study History

(Inspired by this list by Kelly Marcus)

Studying History:

  1. Allows Us to Understand Society
  2. Allows Us Understand Change (especially over time)
  3. Provides a Sense of Identity
  4. Preserves Our Stories
  5. Inspires Us
  6. Teaches Us Warning Signs
  7. Helps Us Be Better People
  8. Teaches Us Amazing Skills (like creating arguments, using evidence, writing and speaking well)
  9. Makes Us Wicked Good at Trivia Games

For more on why to study History, click here.

Book News

Rebecca Tuuri's Strategic Sisterhood cover

Dr. Rebecca Tuuri's first book, Strategic Sisterhood: The National Council of Negro Women in the Black Freedom Struggle, was recently published by the University of North Carolina Press.  Reviewer Gail S. Murray (Rhodes College) states: "Strategic Sisterhood is an important and timely analysis of how citizens can work across class and racial divides to improve opportunity and access for black women. This story is engrossing, and Tuuri's arguments are sophisticated, convincing, and forcefully written."  Congratulations, Dr. Tuuri! 

New Book

Joshua Haynes Patrolling the Border cover

The University of Georgia Press recently published Dr. Joshua Haynes's first book Patrolling the Border: Theft and Violence on the Creek-Georgia Frontier, 1770–1796 in their prestigious Early American Places Series.  Haynes studies a late eighteenth-century conflict between Creek Indians and Georgians that was marked by years of seemingly random theft and violence culminating in open war along the Oconee River.  Dr. Haynes argues that the period should be viewed as the struggle of nonstate indigenous people to develop an effective method of resisting colonization.  Way to go, Dr. Haynes!