Skills History Teaches: Oral Presentations
Critical and Close Reading
Skills History Teaches: Research
Forming Arguments
Skills History Teaches: Writing
Skills History Teaches: Oral Presentations
Critical and Close Reading
Skills History Teaches: Research
Forming Arguments
Skills History Teaches: Writing

Why Study History?

9 Reasons to Study History

(Inspired by this list by Kelly Marcus)

Studying History:

  1. Allows Us to Understand Society
  2. Allows Us Understand Change (especially over time)
  3. Provides a Sense of Identity
  4. Preserves Our Stories
  5. Inspires Us
  6. Teaches Us Warning Signs
  7. Helps Us Be Better People
  8. Teaches Us Amazing Skills (like creating arguments, using evidence, writing and speaking well)
  9. Makes Us Wicked Good at Trivia Games

For more on why to study History, click here.

Events

On Saturday, March 25, 2017 the History Department will host the Mississippi state contest of National History Day, where history faculty enjoy and assess project presentations by history students from all across the state. National History Day is a nationwide competition for middle and high school students.  It encourages students to use their creativity to develop original historical research focused on an annual theme.  The Department of History at the University of Southern Mississippi hosts the annual statewide contest every year and helps to prepare students for the national competition held each year in College Park, Maryland.

NHD

News

For Mississippi’s Bicentennial, the University Libraries’ Special Collections Department will host a lecture by the History Department’s own Dr. Max Grivno on “Lost Bodies and Stolen History: Slavery and Memory in Mississippiat 6 p.m. on February 23 in the Cook Library Art Gallery.

Dr. Grivno will use the defacing of markers commemorating the murder of Emmett Till as a starting point for a discussion of how the state has attempted to obscure the histories of the black Mississippians whose bodies were broken, and whose histories were erased, over the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. He will also explore how those histories were expunged and sanitized in a range of settings, ranging from textbooks to official state histories to museums. 

Mississippi Bicentennial Flag 2017