Skills History Teaches: Research
Critical and Close Reading
Forming Arguments
Skills History Teaches: Writing
Skills History Teaches: Oral Presentations
Skills History Teaches: Research
Critical and Close Reading
Forming Arguments
Skills History Teaches: Writing
Skills History Teaches: Oral Presentations

Why Study History?

9 Reasons to Study History

(Inspired by this list by Kelly Marcus)

Studying History:

  1. Allows Us to Understand Society
  2. Allows Us Understand Change (especially over time)
  3. Provides a Sense of Identity
  4. Preserves Our Stories
  5. Inspires Us
  6. Teaches Us Warning Signs
  7. Helps Us Be Better People
  8. Teaches Us Amazing Skills (like creating arguments, using evidence, writing and speaking well)
  9. Makes Us Wicked Good at Trivia Games

For more on why to study History, click here.

Book News

Kevin Greene's The Invention and Reinvention of Big Bill BroonzyThe University of North Carolina Press recently published Dr. Kevin Greene’s new book, The Invention and Reinvention of Big Bill Broonzy, which examines the life and times legendary bluesman William “Big Bill” Broonzy (1893-1958). This book argues that Broonzy's popular success testifies to his ability to navigate the cultural expectations of his different audiences. However, this constant reinvention came at a personal and professional cost. Greene assesses major themes and events in African American history, including the Great Migration, urbanization, and black expatriate encounters with European culture consumers. Congratulations, Dr. Greene!

New Book

Dr. Andrew Wiest’s latest book, Charlie Company's Journey Home: The Forgotten Impact on the Wives of Vietnam Veterans, was just released by Osprey Publishing. This study on the wives of American soldiers fighting in the Vietnam War reveals the transformations those marriages underwent during the war. Focusing in on just one company's experience of war and its eventual homecoming, Wiest shines a light on the shared experience of combat and both the darkness and resiliency of war's aftermath. Well done, Dr. Wiest!