Skills History Teaches: Oral Presentations
Critical and Close Reading
Skills History Teaches: Research
Forming Arguments
Skills History Teaches: Writing
Skills History Teaches: Oral Presentations
Critical and Close Reading
Skills History Teaches: Research
Forming Arguments
Skills History Teaches: Writing

Why Study History?

9 Reasons to Study History

(Inspired by this list by Kelly Marcus)

Studying History:

  1. Allows Us to Understand Society
  2. Allows Us Understand Change (especially over time)
  3. Provides a Sense of Identity
  4. Preserves Our Stories
  5. Inspires Us
  6. Teaches Us Warning Signs
  7. Helps Us Be Better People
  8. Teaches Us Amazing Skills (like creating arguments, using evidence, writing and speaking well)
  9. Makes Us Wicked Good at Trivia Games

For more on why to study History, click here.

Events

On Saturday, March 25, 2017 the History Department will host the Mississippi state contest of National History Day, where history faculty enjoy and assess project presentations by history students from all across the state. National History Day is a nationwide competition for middle and high school students.  It encourages students to use their creativity to develop original historical research focused on an annual theme.  The Department of History at the University of Southern Mississippi hosts the annual statewide contest every year and helps to prepare students for the national competition held each year in College Park, Maryland.

NHD

News

Inaugural Clyde Kennard Lecture Series

An upcoming lecture series named after Clyde Kennard is a collaborative initiative sponsored by the College of Arts and Letters at The University of Southern Mississippi, Mississippi Humanities Council (MHC), Historic Eureka School and Freedom50 Research Group, an interdisciplinary cohort of Southern Miss professors.  The lectures will examine the (in)visible signs of cultural change that have occurred at the university, and the challenges it faces as a public institution marked by a sordid history of race relations as it also extends to the entire state.

The final lecture of the series on April 6, 2017 will feature the History Department’s own Dr. Rebecca Tuuri, Assistant Professor of History, who will discuss the evolution of Black student activism on campus.  Each lecture will begin at 6 p.m. and is free and open to the public.  For more information on the lecture series, CLICK HERE.