Dale Lecture 2017
Books
McCarthy Wordle
Waging Peace Conference 2016
Roundtable
Dale Lecture 2017
Books
McCarthy Wordle
Waging Peace Conference 2016
Roundtable

War & Society?

War and Society, a field born out of the “new social history” movement of the 1970s, expands on the field of military history, with its traditional focus on leaders, strategy, and battle movements.  War & Society scholars look at war and the military “from the bottom up,” studying the consequences of conflict on communities, soldiers, non-combatants, societies, and cultures.  They also focus on how a historical society’s ideals and values influenced the makeup of its armed forces and the way it fought its wars.  The War & Society field grows stronger every year, as can be seen in the diversity of academic projects undertaken by the faculty and graduate students of the Dale Center for the Study of War & Society at Southern Miss.

 

 

Events

The Dale Center is pleased to announce that General David Petraeus (U.S. Army, Retired) will deliver the 2017 Lt. Col. John H. Dale Distinguished Lecture in International Security and Global Policy at 7pm on Tuesday, September 26, 2017 at the Historic Saenger Theatre in downtown Hattiesburg.  Petraeus will reflect on his strategy of the troop surge in Iraq, offer his analysis of its ultimate accomplishments in light of the current situation in the Middle East, and share his thoughts on the region’s future.  Taking place less than a year into a new U.S. presidential administration, Petraeus’s lecture, especially his remarks on the future of Iraq and its neighbors, will provide a timely complement to the Trump Administration's international security strategy. For additional information, click here

News

Johns Hopkins University Press recently released Integrating the US Military Race, Gender, and Sexual Orientation since World War II, by Dr. Douglas Bristol and Dr. Heather Stur, both fellows in the Dale Center.

This edited collection traces the experiences of African Americans, Japanese Americans, women, and gay men and lesbians in the armed forces since World War II. By examining controversies from racial integration to the dismantling of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” to the recent repeal of the ban on women in combat, these essays show that the military is an important institution in which social change is confirmed and, occasionally, accelerated. Remarkably, the challenges launched against the racial, gender, and sexual status quo in the postwar years have also broadly transformed overarching ideas about power, citizenship, and America’s role in the world.