2017-2019 Gen. Buford Blount Professor of Military History
Books by Dale Center Fellows
Teaching
McCarthy Wordle
Dale Lecture 2017: Gen. Davis Petraeus
2017-2019 Gen. Buford Blount Professor of Military History
Books by Dale Center Fellows
Teaching
McCarthy Wordle
Dale Lecture 2017: Gen. Davis Petraeus

War & Society?

War and Society, a field born out of the “new social history” movement of the 1970s, expands on the field of military history, with its traditional focus on leaders, strategy, and battle movements.  War & Society scholars look at war and the military “from the bottom up,” studying the consequences of conflict on communities, soldiers, non-combatants, societies, and cultures.  They also focus on how a historical society’s ideals and values influenced the makeup of its armed forces and the way it fought its wars.  The War & Society field grows stronger every year, as can be seen in the diversity of academic projects undertaken by the faculty and graduate students of the Dale Center for the Study of War & Society at Southern Miss.

British Rosie the Riveter
 

 

Book News

The University of Georgia Press just released Patrolling the Border: Theft and Violence on the Creek-Georgia Frontier, 1770–1796 authored by Dale Center fellow Joshua Haynes

Patrolling the Border focuses on a late eighteenth-century conflict between Creek Indians and Georgians. The conflict was marked by years of seemingly random theft and violence culminating in open war along the Oconee River. Haynes argues that the period should be viewed as the struggle of nonstate indigenous people to develop an effective method of resisting colonization.

 

Book News

Jeremy Maxwell_Brotherhood in Combat cover

The University of Oklahoma Press recently published Dr. Jeremy P. Maxwell's first book Brotherhood in Combat: How African Americans Found Equality in Korea and VietnamDr. Maxwell is the DPAA POW/MIA Postdoctoral Fellow in the Dale Center.  Using a wealth of oral histories from black and white soldiers and marines who served in one or both conflicts, Jeremy P. Maxwell explores racial tension—pervasive in rear units, but relatively rare on the front lines. His work reveals that in initially proving their worth to their white brethren on the battlefield, African Americans changed the prevailing attitudes of those ranking officials who could bring about changes in policy. Congratulations, Dr. Maxwell!